hornetssale

The NBA may buy the Hornets. Yes, the situation is that bad.

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Okay, so a lot’s happened in the last 24 hours (most of which actually happened last week, but we’ll get to that) with the ownership situation in New Orleans. The world is much different than it was two days ago. In short, the NBA is closing in on the purchase of the New Orleans Hornets by the league itself.

Apparently, in a Sports Illustrated story by Ian Thomsen last week, a reference was made to league considering purchasing the Hornets in an effort to stabilize the ownership situation with George Shinn wanting out-out-out and negotiations with Gary Chouest stalling. This slipped by most of us because, really, who reads things you have to hold anymore, besides your grandmother? (All kidding aside, the fact that this slipped by is pretty staggering).

Marc Stein of ESPN followed up last night and reported that the league is indeed in consideration of acquiring the Hornets in a situation similar to that of what MLB did with the Expos. Immediately following that, the Times Picayune reported that Gary Chouest was dropping out of negotiations for majority ownership. This morning, John Reid at that established publication reports that Chouest was concerned about the impending work stoppage as well as his ability to devote the necessary time to the franchise.

(Pant, pant. Okay, here we go again.)

This morning, NBA FanHouse’s Sam Amick reports that not only is the league considering it, they are well on their way towards moving to acquire the team, and have even selected personnel to run the team in the interim while it works to find stable ownership. The league obviously is not looking to hold the team long-term, but is looking to find ownership which will keep the team in New Orleans and avoid a very dicey PR situation with the second team moving in three years and less than a half decade after Katrina and all its horror.

And all of this is after it was revealed that the team would have an opt-out from its lease if attendance measures didn’t dramatically recover which would drop the Hornets penalties for bolting New Orleans to a mere $10 million.

The league exploring this drastic of a solution leads to the question of whether they’re concerned that current majority owner George Shinn, desperate to dump his ownership, might sell the team to someone who may not be committed to keeping the team in the Crescent City. Alternatively, it may simply be a sign of the times that there’s not another viable option the league is willing to wait on. This will be the fourth team in the past year to change ownership, which is, you know, kind of a lot.

The league also will want to resolve the situation quickly, since having control of the ownership is A. a drain on resources and B. is likely to have complications with the CBA negotiations coming this summer, particularly with the Hornets being a small-market team which is a major issue in negotiations. It’s also a very controlling move by the league, which has not been hands-on with ownership situations (as opposed to players issues which they have been very hands-on with). The league did not intercede with the Dolan-Thomas disaster in New York, nor with the Cohan issues in Golden State. We’re looking at a situation without precedent in basketball, and one which could have far-reaching implications for how how the league handles such matters in the future, the CBA negotiations, and most importantly, the future of professional basketball in New Orleans.

Commissioner David Stern already came under enough fire for his involvement with the Clay-Bennett-backed move of the Sonics to OKC where he was seen as more of a willing accomplice than an outright actor. But if the league is unable to find a local ownership group to satisfy the league’s requirements and a stronger offer is brought from a group in a prospective NBA city (like Kansas City, Anaheim, Las Vegas, or Seattle), it could be seen as a deliberate effort by the league to get out of what some consider to be an impossible market in New Orleans, despite what Hornets president Hugh Weber says is a situation that can work. Take a second and realize that should the NBA relocate the Hornets to Seattle it would be viewed as a good thing by many of the big-market-leaning press and a rectification of past sins by the league in moving the Sonics to begin with. And it would likely mean the outright dissolution of the Hornets franchise itself (as a reversion back to the Sonics would be nearly a lock).

This is all very unlikely, as the league’s first and foremost effort will be to find local ownership committed to New Orleans. But with an arena many consider to be far below NBA standards, in a market far below what most consider NBA standards, and with a fanbase showing a lack of support far below NBA standards, this could drag on, locking the NBA in a quagmire of their own.

This is a whole new ballgame.

Carmelo Anthony: I’d consider waiving no-trade clause if Knicks want to rebuild

PHOENIX, AZ - DECEMBER 13:  Kristaps Porzingis #6 and Carmelo Anthony #7 of the New York Knicks reacts during the second half of the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at Talking Stick Resort Arena on December 13, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  The Suns defeated the Knicks 113-111 in overtime. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Carmelo Anthony told Phil Jackson he wanted to remain with the Knicks.

Case closed?

Anthony holds a no-trade clause and, therefore, all the leverage. He has repeatedly publicly stated his desire to remain in New York, and this was just the latest example of that commitment.

But apparently he’s open to being dealt under the right circumstances.

Anthony, via Al Iannazzone of Newsday:

“I think it will be more on the front office,” Anthony told Newsday this week. “I have the power, but still I would talk to them. We would be in communication if they feel like they want to go in a different direction, they want to start rebuilding for the future. If they tell me they want to scrap this whole thing, yeah, I have to consider it.”

Anthony, 32, made it clear he isn’t thinking about going anywhere, nor does he allow himself at this point. He and his family love it in New York, and his son is in school here.

The Knicks’ fundamental issue: Anthony is 32, and Kristaps Porzingis is 21. Their timelines just offer little to no overlap. New York might be better off building around Porzingis.

But the Knicks have already given lucrative long-term contracts to 31-year-olds Joakim Noah and Courtney Lee. Noah’s deal – worth more than $72 million over four years – is particularly onerous. It would be difficult for New York to pivot into rebuilding – and that starts with Anthony.

He’d like be choosy about where he’d go in a trade, and contenders will be reluctant to part with significant pieces for an aging scorer with few complementary skills. And it’s hard to fit Anthony’s salary, either into cap space or through salary matching, without surrendering key players.

So, there are significant roadblocks to the Knicks ever actually trading Anthony. But that he acknowledges hypothetically accepting a deal means something.

Report: Danny Ferry not expected to supplant Dell Demps as Pelicans GM

CLEVELAND - JUNE 02:  General Manager Danny Ferry of the Cleveland Cavaliers celebrates after the Cavs won 98-82 to win the Detroit Pistons in Game Six of the Eastern Conference Finals during the 2007 NBA Playoffs on June 2, 2007 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Pelicans general manager Dell Demps has repeatedly failed to build an adequate supporting cast around Anthony Davis, keeping Demps on the hot seat.

Meanwhile, former Hawks and Cavaliers general manager Danny Ferry – still respected in many circles, despite using “African” pejoratively to describe Luol Deng – is working in New Orleans’ front office.

You can see where this is going…

Or not.

Zach Lowe of ESPN:

Don’t look for Danny Ferry, currently an advisor to the front office, to take over in any shakeup, sources say.

I’m skeptical. Nobody wants to acknowledge an internal coup before it’s executed. Doing so would create a terrible workplace environment until it happens or if it doesn’t.

The Pelicans’ ownership situation makes this a little more tricky. There’s an apparent desire in New Orleans to win quickly for an aging Benson, and that directive has limited Demps’ flexibility.

Still, Demps’ plans have mostly busted. Eventually, he’ll run out of chances to try new ones.

If that happens soon, when the Pelicans search for a replacement, Ferry will be right there with an impressive record building up Atlanta and no stains that make him unhirable to New Orleans. Would the Pelicans, who thought enough of him to hire him once already, really not consider promoting him?

Report: Potential top-10 pick, Indiana’s OG Anunoby, undergoes season-ending knee surgery

Indiana's OG Anunoby dunks during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Rutgers, Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017, in Bloomington, Ind. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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Indiana players and coaches were tearing up after OG Anunoby got hurt.

Unfortunately, their fears about the lottery prospect were founded.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

Indiana Hoosiers sophomore forward OG Anunoby will undergo right knee surgery and miss the rest of the NCAA season, sources told The Vertical.

The 6-foot-8 small forward is a versatile defender. He has grown as a shooter, and there’s hope he could become a 3-and-D player – or, given his athleticism, maybe more.

Anunoby wasn’t in the top tier of prospects in a loaded 2017 NBA draft, but he was headed toward the lottery, maybe even the top 10. How he recovers from this injury will factor significantly into his draft stock now.

On the bright side, this is less opportunity for scouts to pick apart his raw offense (though it’s also less opportunity for Anunoby to develop).

NBA: Mavericks got away with key late foul in win over Bulls

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Wesley Matthews hit the game-winning 3-pointer in the Mavericks’ 99-98 win over the Bulls on Wednesday.

But perhaps the game would’ve had a different outcome with correct officiating down the stretch.

Dallas guard Seth Curry got away with a loose-ball foul on Robin Lopez with 1:26 left, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report:

Curry (DAL) clamps the arm of Lopez (CHI) and affects his ability to retrieve the rebound.

A correct call would’ve put Dallas in the penalty and sent Lopez – who has made 66% of his free throws this season and and 76% for his career – to the line for two attempts.

Instead, not only was Lopez denied his free throws, he committed a frustration foul on Dirk Nowitzki – who grabbed the rebound with help of Curry – moments later. Nowitzki converted one of two free throws.

We’ll never know how the rest of the game would’ve played out after a correct call, but a swing of 1-to-3 points is pretty big in a one-point game.