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The NBA may buy the Hornets. Yes, the situation is that bad.

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Okay, so a lot’s happened in the last 24 hours (most of which actually happened last week, but we’ll get to that) with the ownership situation in New Orleans. The world is much different than it was two days ago. In short, the NBA is closing in on the purchase of the New Orleans Hornets by the league itself.

Apparently, in a Sports Illustrated story by Ian Thomsen last week, a reference was made to league considering purchasing the Hornets in an effort to stabilize the ownership situation with George Shinn wanting out-out-out and negotiations with Gary Chouest stalling. This slipped by most of us because, really, who reads things you have to hold anymore, besides your grandmother? (All kidding aside, the fact that this slipped by is pretty staggering).

Marc Stein of ESPN followed up last night and reported that the league is indeed in consideration of acquiring the Hornets in a situation similar to that of what MLB did with the Expos. Immediately following that, the Times Picayune reported that Gary Chouest was dropping out of negotiations for majority ownership. This morning, John Reid at that established publication reports that Chouest was concerned about the impending work stoppage as well as his ability to devote the necessary time to the franchise.

(Pant, pant. Okay, here we go again.)

This morning, NBA FanHouse’s Sam Amick reports that not only is the league considering it, they are well on their way towards moving to acquire the team, and have even selected personnel to run the team in the interim while it works to find stable ownership. The league obviously is not looking to hold the team long-term, but is looking to find ownership which will keep the team in New Orleans and avoid a very dicey PR situation with the second team moving in three years and less than a half decade after Katrina and all its horror.

And all of this is after it was revealed that the team would have an opt-out from its lease if attendance measures didn’t dramatically recover which would drop the Hornets penalties for bolting New Orleans to a mere $10 million.

The league exploring this drastic of a solution leads to the question of whether they’re concerned that current majority owner George Shinn, desperate to dump his ownership, might sell the team to someone who may not be committed to keeping the team in the Crescent City. Alternatively, it may simply be a sign of the times that there’s not another viable option the league is willing to wait on. This will be the fourth team in the past year to change ownership, which is, you know, kind of a lot.

The league also will want to resolve the situation quickly, since having control of the ownership is A. a drain on resources and B. is likely to have complications with the CBA negotiations coming this summer, particularly with the Hornets being a small-market team which is a major issue in negotiations. It’s also a very controlling move by the league, which has not been hands-on with ownership situations (as opposed to players issues which they have been very hands-on with). The league did not intercede with the Dolan-Thomas disaster in New York, nor with the Cohan issues in Golden State. We’re looking at a situation without precedent in basketball, and one which could have far-reaching implications for how how the league handles such matters in the future, the CBA negotiations, and most importantly, the future of professional basketball in New Orleans.

Commissioner David Stern already came under enough fire for his involvement with the Clay-Bennett-backed move of the Sonics to OKC where he was seen as more of a willing accomplice than an outright actor. But if the league is unable to find a local ownership group to satisfy the league’s requirements and a stronger offer is brought from a group in a prospective NBA city (like Kansas City, Anaheim, Las Vegas, or Seattle), it could be seen as a deliberate effort by the league to get out of what some consider to be an impossible market in New Orleans, despite what Hornets president Hugh Weber says is a situation that can work. Take a second and realize that should the NBA relocate the Hornets to Seattle it would be viewed as a good thing by many of the big-market-leaning press and a rectification of past sins by the league in moving the Sonics to begin with. And it would likely mean the outright dissolution of the Hornets franchise itself (as a reversion back to the Sonics would be nearly a lock).

This is all very unlikely, as the league’s first and foremost effort will be to find local ownership committed to New Orleans. But with an arena many consider to be far below NBA standards, in a market far below what most consider NBA standards, and with a fanbase showing a lack of support far below NBA standards, this could drag on, locking the NBA in a quagmire of their own.

This is a whole new ballgame.

Dion Waiters explains decision to sign with the Heat in an Instagram post

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 24:  Dion Waiters #3 of the Oklahoma City Thunder reacts in the first quater against the Golden State Warriors in game four of the Western Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 24, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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On Monday, Dion Waiters agreed to a one-year, $2.9 million deal with the Heat, far less than most people thought he would get as one of the few significant free agents still on the market. Tuesday afternoon, he posted an explanation on Instagram for his deal.

Here’s what he said:

I didn’t do it for the money… I did it for the opportunity to go out & ball & have fun. Everything else will take care of its self!!! I just felt like it was the best situation for me…& my family. I could have waited & got wat I wanted. But I rather be happy then miserable at the end of the day!!! Meaning Yu can have everything & still not be happy… #heatnation let’s get it!!! #provethemwrong #stamped #Philly

It seems clear, based on the market, that the kinds of offers Waiters was hoping for weren’t out there for him. In Miami, with Dwyane Wade gone, he’ll probably start at shooting guard and have plenty of opportunities to prove himself in hopes of landing a long-term deal next summer.

Report: Celtics sign second-round pick Demetrius Jackson to four-year deal

PHILADELPHIA, PA - MARCH 27:  Demetrius Jackson #11 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish walks to the bench late in the second half against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament East Regional Final at Wells Fargo Center on March 27, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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While we wait for the Celtics to make a bigger move to trade for another star, they’re filling out the end of their roster. Sheridan Hoops’ Michael Scotto is reporting that they’ve signed Demetrius Jackson, the No. 45 pick in last month’s draft, to a four-year deal.

Jackson declared for the draft after his junior season at Notre Dame. Talent-wise, he has the chance to be a major steal for Boston — DraftExpress has him ranked as the 17th-best overall prospect in this year’s draft class. But he might not play much his first year. The Celtics’ roster is already crowded and there’s still the chance that they’ll make another move with some of their much-vaunted assets if the right star becomes available.

Hawks sign former Michigan State center Matt Costello

ST LOUIS, MO - MARCH 18: Matt Costello #10 of the Michigan State Spartans handles the ball against Darnell Harris #0 of the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders in the second half during the first round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Scottrade Center on March 18, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
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ATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Hawks have signed undrafted rookie free agent center Matt Costello of Michigan State.

The 6-foot-9, 245-pound Costello averaged 5.7 points and 5 rebounds on the Hawks’ summer league team in Las Vegas.

Costello averaged 10.7 points and 8.2 rebounds as a senior at Michigan State. He holds the school’s career record with 146 blocked shots.

Terms of the deal were not released.

Watch Jamal Crawford drop an effortless 44, hit game winner at Seattle pro-am

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Jamal Crawford knows how to get buckets.

He does it against NBA level defenders, so put him in a free-flowing pro-am — let’s say the Seattle pro-am in his hometown — and he barely breaks a sweat dropping 44. And nailing the game winner.

Doc Rivers hopes to see a lot of that next season.