This season’s top rebounders on pace for all-time mark

Leave a comment

The NBA has seen a lot of fantastic rebounders in its history, but never before has the the league seen so many prolific board men grace its courts at one time. Even during the all-or-nothing days, the Vanishing Point days, the Dirty Mary Crazy Larry days, the NBA typically boasted just one or a few particularly profound rebounders at a time. This year, however, the league boasts an unprecedented number of hyper-effective rebounders.

Five players* are currently grabbing more than 20% of available rebounds for their respective teams: Reggie Evans (26.4% of available rebounds), Kevin Love (24.0%), Marcus Camby (22.0%), Kris Humphries (20.8%), and Dwight Howard (20.6%). According to Basketball-Reference, prior to this year no more than three players have ever averaged a 20+ total rebounding percentage in a given season**, a mark will be shattered in ’10-’11 should those five rebounders hold their statistical ground.

Even more impressive: Andris Biedrins (19.9%) and Blake Griffin (19.8%) are but a few boards away from joining this select company, with Joakim Noah (19.2%) not far behind. These are truly the halcyon days of the rebound, a splendid time for all who worship the transition-turning power of the carom.

It’s a bit difficult, however, to pinpoint exactly why there’s such profound statistical excellence atop the rebounding leaderboards at present as opposed to past years. It’s not as if Kris Humphries is some once-in-a-generation rebounding talent, after all. We can start with pointing out the individual rebounding brilliance of each of these players juxtaposed with their respective teammates; neither Evans nor Love, Camby, Humphries, or Howard has a particularly effective rebounding counterpart. Is that due to some kind of widespread cultural change in the NBA? Are teams relying more heavily on one central rebounder to clean the boards as opposed to some previous team rebounding approach?

It’s possible, and I’m sure the very idea of previous generations doing anything as a collective makes geriatric by-the-book basketball purists foam at the mouth with excitement and affirmation. However, in the case of this particular crop, each player comes to rebounding prominence through very different circumstances. Howard’s rebounding dominance comes by design. Evans’ success is due to his teammates’ non-rebounding orientations. Humphries’ impressive number are partially caused by a teammate’s rebounding regression. If all of the league’s most successful rebounders were featured in systems like that of the Orlando Magic, we may be onto something, but as is, we can only credit such schemes as much as we can the management of David Kahn.

Perhaps the reasoning behind the trend will become more apparent over the course of the year, but for now we just have this benchmark of statistical excellence. The number of great individual rebounders is higher than ever before, almost doubling that of any season dating back to 1970. Maybe Evans, Humphries, and Biedrins aren’t thought of as being all-time great rebounders, but if they keep up their incredible production throughout the entire season, they’ll help set the collective mark for excellence on the boards.

*The only players counted for the purposes of this analysis are those that played enough minutes to qualify as statistical leaders.

**Total rebounding percentage data is only available from the 1970-1971 season onward.

Did Reggie Jackson distract Jimmy Butler into missing game-tying free throw? (video)

Leave a comment

With the Timberwolves trailing the Pistons by three and 6.2 seconds left, Jimmy Butler drew a foul on a 3-pointer.

Butler made the first two free throws then, just before he got the ball for the third, Reggie Jackson interrupted to talk to Stanley Johnson, who was in rebounding position. Butler missed the free throw, and Detroit won 100-97 after an intentional foul.

Butler said Jackson didn’t affect him, but Butler’s side eye during the delay at least appeared to speak loudly.

Bulls’ Kris Dunn dunks on T.J. Warren after savvy/explosive halfcourt drive (video)

Leave a comment

Kris Dunn had a nice weekend – 39 points, 13 assists and 11 rebounds as the Bulls beat the Hornets and lost to the Suns – punctuated by this dunk in Chicago’s 113-105 loss to the Suns last night.

T.J. Warren paid the price for Tyler Ulis overplaying a Robin Lopez screen Dunn cleverly never used.

Orlando Magic will no longer host summer league

Getty Images
1 Comment

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Orlando Magic has decided to end their annual summer league.

Magic president of basketball operations Jeff Weltman said Sunday the trend of NBA teams playing in the Las Vegas Summer League led to the decision end Orlando Pro Summer League. Orlando’s Summer League, which showcased rookies and young players, began in 2002.

Las Vegas will host all 30 teams for the summer league beginning in the summer of 2018. The Orlando Pro Summer League began as a 10-team tournament but there were just eight participating teams this past summer.

The summer league in Orlando, which is played in the Magic’s practice gym, was the only one of three summer leagues that did not allow fans to come in to watch.

Kevin Durant misses game vs. Nets with sprained ankle, status vs. Thunder in doubt

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Not that the Warriors needed him with Stephen Curry going off again, but Golden State was without Kevin Durant on Sunday in Brooklyn due to a sprained ankle.

Durant is officially day-to-day, but that brings up the question of whether he will be ready to go Wednesday night when the Warriors travel to Oklahoma City to take on his former team. Chris Haynes of ESPN asked Durant about it.

While some blowhards will talk about him dodging the Thunder, the Warriors course here is obvious — they do not want to rush him back for any game in November. Even one against Russell Westbrook. Ankles with stretched ligaments are easy to re-injure if not fully healed, and the Warriors don’t want this to be chronic and last through more of the season.

Durant is averaging 24.9 points per game, 7 rebounds, and 4.7 assists, and — with all due respect to fellow former MVP Curry — he is the best player on the Warriors. Maybe the best player in the world right now, period. Durant can score at will, and he had become a key part of the Warriors’ fifth-ranked defense blocking 2.2 shots per game (their offense is No. 1 in the league).