Miami Heat hold players-only meeting after (latest) disappointing loss

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The Heat will have to forgive us, the Heat-seeking public, if we’re not overly impressed by this latest overture. It’s not that it wasn’t, that it isn’t, needed, it was and is. It’s a good sign. But it’s just one lost among so many other bad, bad signs.

After Saturday night’s 95-106 loss to the Mavericks, one in which they had pulled to within 6 with five minutes to go, only to see the Mavericks calmly and deliberately blast them back into a double-digit deficit, Yahoo! Sports reports the Heat held a players-only  meeting. The tried and true measure of how bad things can get when the players decide to boot the coaches to talk amongst themselves in an effort to obtain some measure of accountability and refocus.

Again, pardon us if we’re not overly impressed.

This is a gesture, and gestures simultaneously mean something and nothing at all. Were the Heat to now get themselves “right” (whatever that is since we haven’t seen it yet in their existence during this incarnation’s 17 games), then the gesture was the start of their coming together, of pulling together and reaching at least some measure of their lofty goals they set for themselves. However, if the Heat go out versus the Wizards on Monday and Detroit on Tuesday, in preparation of “Bring Your Own Molotov Cocktail” night at the Q, then it’s simply another in a long line of indications that this team is all hype and no hope, the trend which it has exemplified through the first near-fifth of the season.

One problem with this team can easily be identified in their quotes:

From Bosh:

“We were just looking at each other and being honest, that’s what it’s all about,” Bosh told Yahoo! Sports about the meeting. “I think when you’re in situations like these and around guys all the time, you need to be honest with each other. Just talk and put our foot down about the season and put it in minds that we’re better than this, and we’re going to do better than this.”

To Wade:

“This is a new team, a new group of guys,” Wade said. “Guys need to understand and know each other and get to hear each other talk. And I think we all feel better after the talk we have.”

To James:

“This is a team that is new to each other,” James said. “It’s going to take time. But the thing we can do right now is just go out and just play, play harder, don’t have any lapses. I think the fact that we know we are so talented individually, we feel we can have lapses at times.”

Notice how in every instance it’s about “we” and not “I?”

Now, this is a tricky thing. If the three were all talking about themselves and what they need to do better, the media would no doubt be slamming the door on their hands about being selfish and thinking me-first. The Heat have every justification for saying they can’t win in this situation, and that they’re just trying to make it clear they think of themselves as a team, and not individuals.

The problem?

Responsibility can be shared but leadership needs to be expressed by the individual taking hold of his own shortcomings and setting an example to the rest that “this has to start with me.” There’s not enough among the three of talking about how they need to improve their own performance. There’s not enough about how they need to start leading, taking charge, and being the stars that they are.

In a crucial possession last night, Dwyane Wade did what he’s done a million times this season, seemingly. He drove past his defender. He reached the paint. He found the defender closing in to make contact and… jump passed to James Jones who badly bricked a three.

That’s not going to cut it. The Big 3 should make it easier on one-another to produce points with the attention they draw, not James Jones or Eddie House or Joel Anthony or Zydrunas Ilgauskas or whatever retread player they’ve filled the gaps in with. It starts and ends with the Big 3. And so far they’ve been a lot of talk, in front of and behind closed doors, and very little action.

We’ll see if they can capitalize on whatever it is they sorted out last night in the locker room or if this situation only continues to disintegrate, in this, the Big Letdown so far.

Bobby Portis apologizes for punching Nikola Mirotic in the face (VIDEO)

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As if this season wasn’t going to be hard enough for the Chicago Bulls, it started off on the wrong foot when Bobby Portis and Nikola Mirotic got into a fight during practice. That fight resulted in a facial fracture for Mirotic, putting one of Chicago’s best players out for multiple weeks.

Portis addressed the issue this week by apologizing to fans, the team, and Mirotic. However, Portis said that he has not heard from Mirotic since the fight, and that he did not respond when he tried to call his teammate.

Video of Portis’ apology is interesting if only because it’s a bit hard to discern the level of sincerity.

Via Twitter:

Chicago is 0-2 on the season. Portis is in the middle of serving an 8 game suspension for the incident.

Giannis Antetokounmpo scores career-high 44, dedicates game to father

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MILWAUKEE (AP) — After scoring a career-high 44 points, Giannis Antetokounmpo wrote a note on the game ball.

“This is for daddy. We got a win tonight,” the 22-year-old Milwaukee Bucks player said, remembering his father, Charles, who died last month at age 54.

Antetokounmpo scored 17 points in the fourth quarter, including a dunk that put Milwaukee ahead 111-110 with 11 seconds to go.

After a timeout, Damian Lillard found Jusuf Nurkic running open down the lane, but Antetokounmpo blocked his shot at the basket, sending the 7-foot center crashing to the floor.

Antetokounmpo, starting his fifth NBA season, made 17 of 23 shots with eight rebounds and four assists as Milwaukee kept pace with a Portland team that had dominated its first two opponents. The Bucks star is averaging 38.3 points through three games, up from 22.9 last year, 16.9 in 2015-16 and 12.7 in 2014-15.

“Seventy-nine more. This is just the beginning,” he said, thinking about how many regular-season games remain.

After Nurkic was rejected at the basket, Khris Middleton was fouled and made both free throws.

“They committed two guys to Dame, so somebody was going to be open,” Portland coach Terry Stotts said, referring to Lillard. “Turned out to be Nurk but they made a really good defensive play.”

Lillard scored 26 points, including 16 in the fourth quarter. CJ McCollum also scored 26, and Nurkic had 17 points and 11 rebounds. Tony Snell scored 17 points and Middleton added 16 for Milwaukee.

 

Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant ejected at end of loss to Grizzlies

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Stephen Curry is going to get fined for this.

The former MVP was frustrated, his team losing and thinking he was fouled by Mike Conley as he attacked the rim late in the Warriors loss in Memphis Saturday night. Curry threw his mouthpiece at the referee, which deservedly got him ejected instantly.

Durant followed him to the locker room, making a gesture that will earn him a fine as well.

The Warriors are 1-2 to start the season and there are a lot of factors at play. The China trip does this to teams, and throw in three straight trips to the Finals on top of it and it has an impact. The team is a little banged up. However, the biggest issue is their defense is a mess right now.

The Warriors will straighten it out eventually, but the start of the season could be a rough one for them.

Pacers owner says team not for sale, will not be moved from Indianapolis

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There are more than a few NBA owners who are seeing the prices teams are being sold for — the Rockets just sold for a record $2.2 billion — and considering their options. Some other billionaires are looking for teams, several with the goal of packing up the franchise and moving it to their respected hometowns.

Those billionaires need not call Herb Simon. The Pacers owner said the team is not going anywhere, speaking to Gregg Doyel of the IndyStar.

“I want to leave my legacy: This team permanently in Indianapolis,” Simon told IndyStar Friday in an interview at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. “That’s my No. 1 goal.”

Simon bought the Pacers in 1983 with his older brother, Melvin — who died in 2009 at age 82. He told IndyStar the team someday will be owned by his 53-year-old son, Steve. Behind the scenes, Steve Simon has been working closely with Pacers Sports and President Rick Fuson for five years — “He knows more about the dollars and cents than I do,” Herb said of his son — and met this week with several department heads.

“If anything happens to me, he’d be taking over,” Herb said, adding that father and son are on the same page: The Pacers are staying in Indianapolis.

Good. That is as it should be.

Indiana is part of America’s basketball heartland, and it should have a team. Pacers fans are smart and loyal, and the team has a long history going back to the ABA, running from Mel Daniels and George McGinnis through Reggie Miller and up to Myles Turner (hopefully he can be on the level of the rest of them someday). They play in the coolest basketball building in the league, one with the history of the sport wolven in.

Indy is the nation’s 27th largest television market, bigger than San Antonio, Salt Lake City, Oklahoma City and other successful NBA franchises. There is no reason the Pacers cannot thrive, so long as ownership is committed.

They are. Which is excellent news for Pacers’ fans.