Miami did the right thing getting rid of Michael Beasley. For both sides.

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The renaissance of Michael Beasley is in full swing in Minnesota.

In the last three games he has put up 33, 28, and 25 points, on 56 percent shooting, and he is 6 of 9 from three. Plus he’s got that hair. He has been the focal point of the Timberwolves offense and he had the game winner against the Clippers Wednesday. On the season he is averaging 7 more points a game on the highest shooting percentages of his career. His rebounds are off slightly, but we’ll blame playing along side Kevin Love for that.

Meanwhile, Chris Bosh has had some well-publicized struggles fitting in with the Heat (at least until last night when Miami went to him early and often). The soft tag has been tossed about and at times he has looked like a third wheel.

So… no. Do not go there. Some of you have. Stop it now. The Heat should not have kept Beasley over Bosh.

The Heat getting rid of Beasley was the right thing to do for a lot of reasons. Chris Bosh is a much, much better fit in Miami. Beasley needed a fresh start, to be a big fish in a small pond where he was more of a focal point. There are more reasons. Let’s go over them.

As Zach Lowe points out a Sports Illustrated’s Point Forward, this whole Beasley/Bosh premise is faulty — Beasley was traded to make room for Mike Miller, not get in Chris Bosh. The Heat already had the big three when they moved Beasley, who will make just under $5 million this season, which cleared room for Mike Miller and his $5 million a year. And the Heat need Miller and his long ball more than they need Beasley.

Secondly, Beasley is doing his damage at the small forward spot in Minnesota. I don’t care how good he’s playing, he’s not better than the small forward Miami already has. If you played Beasley at the four (Bosh’s spot) he suddenly looks undersized, he’s having to play inside and rebound against bigger bodies rather than live on the wings like he does with the Wolves. His production would be very different because what is asked of him is different. And less to his liking.

In Minnesota, Beasley is a small big fish in a small pond — he gets the ball and gets to do what he wants. He’s averaging 17.8 field goal attempts per game. You think he gets to take shots away from LeBron and Wade to do that?

Beasley is having success getting the ball out on the wing, and right now is knocking down a lot of long two pointers, as Kevin Pelton pointed out at ESPN (Insider required). Against the Kings he hit 10 of 15 shots in the 16- to 23-foot range. Against the Knicks he was 7 of 9 from that distance, Wednesday night against the Clippers he was 6 of 10.

Those long twos are not going to keep falling at this rate. Last season Beasley shot 42 percent from that distance, this season it is 55 percent. The league average is under 40 percent. Unless Beasley has taken Dirk Nowitzki’s magic potion, he is not going to keep up this shooting pace from distance.

So Beasley is going to regress — and Bosh isn’t that bad, by the way. He’s giving you 16.4 points and six rebounds a game with an All-Star level PER of 21.4.

Sometimes, trades do work out for everyone. Beasley needed space and a new home where he could be more of the man and find himself. He lost weight, is moving better and is genuinely looking good in that role. That role was no longer available in Miami, which needed a scoring four. They got it. Bosh is good, and his shortcomings are really that he’s not a true center and the Heat need one. Different problem.

But please, do not say the Heat should have kept Beasley. They should not have. Riley made the right call.

Kevin Durant fires back, says Clint Capela’s job is “easy”

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“We’re confident because we know if we’re doing what we’re supposed to do, we’re going to beat them… We are better than them.”

That was young Rockets center Clint Capela after the Rockets beat the Warriors last Saturday night, feeling confident.

Asked about it, Kevin Durant shot Capela down, saying he’s not the guy that should be commenting.

There are no easy jobs in the NBA. It takes a lot of work physically, a good mental feel for the game, and the right opportunity just to get a chance. That said, some NBA jobs are simpler and more straightforward than others. On offense, Capela is not the ball handler and creator making a lot of decisions, things are simple for him — and he executes them. He’s shooting 66.6 percent this season — he does what he does well.

Houston took two of three from Golden State this season, and while that is far from doing it in a playoff series it should be a confidence boost for Houston if/when they go up against Golden State.

Jason Kidd says Giannis Antetokounmpo offered to save his job minutes before firing

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The stagnant Milwaukee Bucks shook things up by firing head coach Jason Kidd  Monday.

Giannis Antetokounmpo was not happy with the news. So much he called up Kidd and offered to help save his job, reports Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.

Antetokounmpo is understandably close to Kidd — he’s been the coach who helped transform the Greek Freak into an NBA superstar. Kidd is on his way to the Hall of Fame as a player, and as a coach had the vision to put the ball in Antetokounmpo’s hands as a point guard. Antetokounmpo trusted Kidd.

However, the Bucks’ growth has been stagnant — this is a team where the players talked about being a 50-win, top-four team in the East with a strong defense, instead they are a team on the way to around .500, barely hanging onto a playoff spot, with the point differential of a team that wins 36 games. They are not taking a step forward, and the Bucks — with the approval of ownership, which was very close to Kidd at one time — approving the move.

There was nothing Antetokounmpo could have done. It’s life in the NBA. That doesn’t mean he has to like it.

Gordon Hayward is shooting standing threes in an empty gym. That’s something, I guess.

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Having lost three games in a row at home, doubt seems to have crept into the minds of some Celtics fans. They’re the top seed in the East (and likely finish the season in that slot, again), but just how good are they really? Do they have enough to knock off the Cavaliers and LeBron James when he goes into playoff mode?

In the midst of that self-doubt, the wife of Gordon Hayward, Robyn, posted this.

Still can’t beat me… 🤷🏻‍♀️

A post shared by Robyn Hayward (@robynmhayward) on

For Boston fans still holding out hope Hayward returns this season, this is another sign. No brace, no chair, he’s draining threes. It’s a step forward.

This video also borders on meaningless — he’s not jumping, not moving, not showing us anything about his recovery we didn’t already know. Good to see him up and making progress, but that he can hit stand-still threes in an empty gym is about as shocking as finding out the next Transformers movie is going to suck.

Officially, Hayward is still out for the season. He’s putting in the work, and maybe he returns before the playoffs, but the Celtics are not going to rush him back for this season. Nor should they. The Celtics are on a multi-year plan to be the next dominant team in the East, no reason to push him and risk anything now.

Report: Giannis Antetokounmpo “devastated” by Jason Kidd firing

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The Bucks have been a team of unfulfilled potential for a few seasons now, two steps up and one step back. Last season they were 42-40 and bounced in the first round of the playoffs, this season they are 23-22 and the eighth seed in the East, with the point differential of a team that should be 20-25 and on its way to a 36-win season.

That cost Jason Kidd his job.

That has not sat well with the team’s superstar Giannis Antetokounmpo, reports Chris Haynes of ESPN.

You can’t blame Antetokounmpo, Kidd has been his coach the past three-and-a-half seasons and guided the Greek Freak’s rise to superstardom. Kidd also was the one who put the ball in Antetokounmpo’s hands and made him both the defacto point guard on the team and one of the league’s most dangerous players. Kidd did some very good things with these Bucks, and Antetokounmpo is understandably loyal to the man.

However, Antetokounmpo is under contract at a near-max salary until the summer of 2021, so he has no real leverage here.

Elite coaches will be lined up for a chance to coach Antetokounmpo and a very talented Bucks roster, but whoever gets the job next summer has to connect with the superstar first. Kidd had done that.