Corey Maggette, Pau Gasol, Matt Barnes

Game of the night: Where the Bucks didn’t want a shootout with the Lakers

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This was supposed to be strength-on-strength. Los Angeles versus Milwaukee. The League’s best offense so far (the Lakers) versus the best defense so far (the Bucks). The Lakers were scoring 116.7 points per 100 possessions, the Bucks were giving up just 96.9. Something had to give.

The Bucks gave. Not just gave, collapsed. Reverted to the fetal position. They couldn’t stop the Lakers so instead they got in a shootout with the best offense in the league. That ended about like you’d expect.

The Lakers won 117-108 putting up a crazy good 126.9 points per 100 possessions.

The Lakers did that doing what they do every game — getting smart, good looks. Simple clean shots from Pau Gasol and Lamar Odom, or kick-outs to shooters. Well, all that and the Kobe show.

The Bucks could not stop it. The Lakers got t the rim, they hit 10 of 16 threes. Kobe was posting up and hitting shots on the move, Shannon Brown had 21 off the bench. All the shots were working.

Meanwhile, it was he Lakers defense that really won them the game. The Bucks stayed close bombing threes and hitting difficult shots (Drew Gooden taking deep twos is not a good offensive strategy). Still, that made for an entertaining first half.

The Lakers wasted no time shredding the Bucks vaunted defense. Well, not the Lakers so much as Kobe. From the start you could tell this was one of those games where Kobe was going to do what he wanted when he wanted.

He scored seven of Lakers’ first nine showing all the different ways you can make John Salmons look bad — first came the bucket-and-one beating Salmons down the floor on the break; then Kobe posted him for two; Then he just elevated and knocked down a jumper right over Salmons.

What made this fun early on is the Bucks couldn’t miss either — while Kobe was going Kobe, Brandon Jennings had two threes and one long two. The Bucks hit 5 of 6 early threes, and even Gooden was in on the act bombing from the outside.

The Bucks were just on fire — they shot 76.3% eFG% in the first quarter, 5-7 from three. And they still trailed by three. That’s when you knew where this was headed. When you’re hitting every shot on your wish list and still trail, it’s bad. Milwaukee didn’t want an old-fashioned shootout but they were in one and found a way to lead 59-57 at the half.

Then the Lakers started playing much better defense. The Bucks shot 38 percent in the third quarter, scored just 22 points. They had six turnovers.

Meanwhile, the Lakers just kept being the Lakers. The Bucks focused on stopping Kobe as the second half wore on and he went into facilitator mode. Shannon Brown continued to show the maturity of his game, as he knocked down key threes whenever he wanted. He had 19 in the second half. The Bucks could do nothing about it.

This was a one-off for the Bucks — their defense is better than this, but they hadn’t gone up against player movement, ball movement and shooting like this yet. There are nights when nobody is stopping the Lakers. This was one.

One other note — Andrew Bogut tweaked is bad elbow during the game and admitted that might bother him more for a little while. Bogut was under the Lakers basket and was undercut by Corey Maggette. When Bogut fell he instinctively put his arms down to break the fall. That aggravated the elbow, which Bogut said would hurt tomorrow.

Pelicans signing center Jerome Jordan

Marc Gasol, Jerome Jordan
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Through the first two weeks of training camp, the Pelicans have seen their frontcourt depth decimated by injuries to Alexis Ajinca and Omer Asik, both of whom are out for a few weeks. A deal with Greg Smith fell through after he failed a physical. Now, Yahoo’s Marc Spears reports that they’re signing former Knicks and Nets center Jerome Jordan as a short-term solution:

Jordan has only played 65 games in his career and hasn’t been spectacular, but the Pelicans need a body while their two centers are out. Anthony Davis will spend some time at center, but considering the contracts Asik and Ajinca got this summer, Alvin Gentry clearly plans on playing him at power forward as well, and they need a center to at least fill time before Asik and Ajinca get back.

Kevin Love unsure about opening-night return

Kevin Love
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He’s back in practice with the Cavaliers, but there’s still no clarity on whether Kevin Love will be available for the season opener. Love had shoulder surgery in April after suffering a torn labrum in Game 4 of the Cavs’ first-round series against the Celtics, and doctors initially gave him a timetable of four to six months for a return. The six-month end of that is right around opening night (October 27), but Love still doesn’t know whether he’ll be able to play against the Bulls—although he is hopeful.

Via the Sporting News‘ Sean Deveney:

“I feel pretty good,” Love told Sporting News. “As far as the opener goes, I am not completely sure. I’ll probably get with the doctors and see what they have to say. I know that my six-month post-op is coming up here pretty fast. As far as getting the strength back, getting the range of motion, I feel pretty good, so I am looking forward to getting into some more contact, getting into a rhythm and getting out there as quickly as I can.”

Love has been cleared for 3-on-3 practices, but not yet for 5-on-5. If it were up to him, he’d be back on the court, but he understands he needs to follow the rehab protocol for his injury.

“(Six months is) just a ballpark figure that has generally been thrown out there by anybody who has talked about the rehab process for this kind of an injury,” Love said. “I like to think that I am ahead of the game, but there’s different tests and the due diligence that the doctor will go through and the training staff will go through. So all I can do is go out there every day and attack my rehab and hopefully I will be able to go out there and help these guys as soon as possible.”

At the very least, the Cavs will be without Kyrie Irving (still recovering from knee surgery) and Iman Shumpert (out up to three months with a wrist injury), and probably Tristan Thompson too, unless his contract situation changes unexpectedly. So having Love available would be some much-needed good news. But it’s more important that Love (and everyone else) is healthy for the playoffs. If he’s not ready to play, there’s no need to rush back for an October game.