Report: NBA owners confirm they want players to take a salary rollback

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We’ve kind of known that NBA owners wanted to roll back existing NBA contracts across the board, even though that was never made official.

Now it’s official — Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver confirmed it to Ken Berger of CBSSports.com.

“It’s part of our proposal,” Silver said. “It included a reduction of existing contracts in addition to a reduction of the maximums going forward.”

A salary rollback. You can imagine how well that is going to go over with the Players Association — he everyone, let’s give back part of your salary.

Berger also says the owners first proposal — rejected out of hand by the players — had a “if you do this now it will not be as severe as what we will ask for later” proposal. Basically a Mafia kind of offer. Nice.

How much of a rollback the owners think they can get is just speculation. You hear some guesses at 20 to 30 percent, but remember the NHL got a 24 percent salary rollback at the cost of one entire season. The NBA will not get that much.

But can they get any rollback at all? Especially at a time when the players can argue that revenue is up, the Heat are creating levels of interest not seen since Jordan retired, and you’ve got the owners themselves going on spending sprees. How do you argue the league is hurting when the Memphis Grizzlies give $45 million over five years to Mike Conley?

Clearly the owners want a change in the business model, at a basic level. It’s not going to be a hard cap, but there will be smaller max deals and likely some kind of out on guaranteed deals so that teams are not stuck paying the Eddy Currys of the world the last few years of his deal.

David Stern and now Silver are taking the hard line. Pretty soon you can bet the Players Association will start pushing back publicly. We’ll be seeing a public debate, one that frankly will have little to do with the reality in the negotiating room.

The lockout is coming people. You can see it, off the record everyone expects it. But the question isn’t the July 1 deadline or the loss of Summer League (which will suck for us die hards but does not matter to the casual fan), the question is one year from right now.

If one year from today we’re writing about fights over salary rollbacks and the cap — if games are being missed — the league will have stepped on the golden egg that Miami has become. (Like them or not, they have spiked interest in the league.) It will take five years or more to get back. Players will lose money; the loss of casual fans will hurt the value of the franchises. Sponsors will flee, as will fans. Television ratings will fall. Everyone will lose. Big.

The players need to give back a little. The owners need to stop digging their own hole then expecting to be bailed out like a bank. Right now everyone is posturing, but we are counting on cooler heads. Some days you just wonder if those heads are out there.

Despite revoked passport, Enes Kanter says Thunder have arranged his travel to Mexico City, Toronto

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Thunder center Enes Kanter – who had passport revoked by Turkey – lacked documentation to travel for a December game against the Nets in Mexico City and a March game against the Raptors in Toronto.

Apparently, that issue has been resolved.

Brett Dawson of The Oklahoman:

Kanter said on Sunday that the team has worked out an arrangement to allow him to travel to games in Toronto and Mexico City even without a passport.

It always seemed highly likely Kanter would get to Toronto and Mexico City. He’s a high-profile millionaire working for a billion-dollar company.

Report: Carmelo Anthony’s camp ‘cautiously optimistic’ Knicks will trade him by Monday

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In July, Carmelo Anthony was reportedly confident he’d be traded to the Rockets.

That optimism always seemed misguided. A couple months later, with Anthony still on the Knicks, it looks downright foolish.

Yet…

Frank Isola of the New York Daily News:

Anthony’s camp is cautiously optimistic that a deal will be struck before Monday, and trying not to think about the potential media circus that will take place if Carmelo is still with the Knicks.

It’s more likely Anthony’s confidants are hopeful than optimistic. If they’re actually optimistic, they’re very likely to be disappointed.

If Anthony hasn’t been traded by now, what will change between now and Monday? Houston still must find a taker for Ryan Anderson, and that’s no easy task – not without relinquishing sweeteners more valuable than Anthony. I suppose Anthony could waive his no-trade clause for additional teams, but it’s late for a deal to come together.

Hopefully for Anthony, his advisors aren’t pinning everything on a longshot trade and are helping him craft answers to the numerous questions he’ll face at media day next week – likely in New York.

Rick Pitino predicts NBA draft will accept high schoolers within two years

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Once an advocate of increasing the age minimum and a willing accepter of one-and-done, NBA commissioner Adam Silver sounded more open about allowing high school players to declare for the NBA draft.

The new Collective Bargaining Agreement left the issue open, but Louisville coach Rick Pitino predicts change is coming – relatively soon.

Pitino, via ESPN:

When I was at Kentucky, I had seven high school basketball players, told me they were coming, and instead, they went to the pros out of high school. And by the way, I think that rule is going to change back to that. I think high school players are going to be able to go pro again.

I think the commissioner is probably going to do it within two years.

Does Pitino know something? With decades of experience in the NBA and college, he could have many contacts with inside information. It’s certainly imperative for devising a recruiting strategy to know how this rule will change.

It’s also possible Pitino saw Silver’s comments, like any outsider could have, and is making a relatively blind guess.

But the possibility of inside information makes his comments more intriguing.

Warriors executive: Golden State rejected richer jersey-ad offers

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The Warriors are charging $60 million over three years for their jersey ads – about double what any other NBA team is getting.

Golden State chief marketing officer Chip Bowers, via Darren Rovell of ESPN:

“We actually had multiple finalists,” Warriors chief marketing officer Chip Bowers said. “This was not the biggest deal that we were offered.”

Bowers said the team felt it was important for the deal to be with a worldwide brand.

Light years ahead.