Report: NBA owners confirm they want players to take a salary rollback

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We’ve kind of known that NBA owners wanted to roll back existing NBA contracts across the board, even though that was never made official.

Now it’s official — Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver confirmed it to Ken Berger of CBSSports.com.

“It’s part of our proposal,” Silver said. “It included a reduction of existing contracts in addition to a reduction of the maximums going forward.”

A salary rollback. You can imagine how well that is going to go over with the Players Association — he everyone, let’s give back part of your salary.

Berger also says the owners first proposal — rejected out of hand by the players — had a “if you do this now it will not be as severe as what we will ask for later” proposal. Basically a Mafia kind of offer. Nice.

How much of a rollback the owners think they can get is just speculation. You hear some guesses at 20 to 30 percent, but remember the NHL got a 24 percent salary rollback at the cost of one entire season. The NBA will not get that much.

But can they get any rollback at all? Especially at a time when the players can argue that revenue is up, the Heat are creating levels of interest not seen since Jordan retired, and you’ve got the owners themselves going on spending sprees. How do you argue the league is hurting when the Memphis Grizzlies give $45 million over five years to Mike Conley?

Clearly the owners want a change in the business model, at a basic level. It’s not going to be a hard cap, but there will be smaller max deals and likely some kind of out on guaranteed deals so that teams are not stuck paying the Eddy Currys of the world the last few years of his deal.

David Stern and now Silver are taking the hard line. Pretty soon you can bet the Players Association will start pushing back publicly. We’ll be seeing a public debate, one that frankly will have little to do with the reality in the negotiating room.

The lockout is coming people. You can see it, off the record everyone expects it. But the question isn’t the July 1 deadline or the loss of Summer League (which will suck for us die hards but does not matter to the casual fan), the question is one year from right now.

If one year from today we’re writing about fights over salary rollbacks and the cap — if games are being missed — the league will have stepped on the golden egg that Miami has become. (Like them or not, they have spiked interest in the league.) It will take five years or more to get back. Players will lose money; the loss of casual fans will hurt the value of the franchises. Sponsors will flee, as will fans. Television ratings will fall. Everyone will lose. Big.

The players need to give back a little. The owners need to stop digging their own hole then expecting to be bailed out like a bank. Right now everyone is posturing, but we are counting on cooler heads. Some days you just wonder if those heads are out there.

Russell Westbrook scores most points ever in triple-double, 57

AP Photo/John Raoux
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Russell Westbrook led a double-digit comeback in the final minutes of the fourth quarter. Been there done, that.

Westbrook hit a defining buzzer-beating 3-pointer. Been there done, that.

Westbrook posted a historic triple-double. Been there, done that.

All three in one game?

That’s a new level for Westbrook, who lifted the Thunder to a 114-106 win over the Magic tonight while posting an incredible stat line: 57 points, 13 rebounds and 11 assists.

James Harden scored 53 in a triple-double just this season, and Westbrook has already one-upped that record.

This MVP race is one for the ages.

Russell Westbrook’s 3-pointer caps incredible Thunder comeback, send Magic game to OT (video)

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The Thunder trailed the Magic by 21 points in the second half and 14 points midway through the fourth quarter.

Russell Westbrook capped the incredible comeback with this 3-pointer to send the game to overtime.

This becoming the norm for Oklahoma City.

NBA: Timberwolves got away with key late foul in win over Pacers

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Paul George expressed extreme dismay after the Pacers’ loss to the Timberwolves last night — the latest cause for concern in Indiana with its biggest star just one season from free agency.

But perhaps George wouldn’t have sounded so disillusioned if that game featured correct officiating down the stretch.

Minnesota’s Kris Dunn got away with fouling Jeff Teague by disrupting the Pacers guard’s speed/quickness/balance rhythm with 21.6 seconds left, according to the NBA’s Last Two Minute Report:

Dunn (MIN) makes contact to Teague’s (IND) arm that affects his SQBR and causes him to lose control of the ball.

Because the Timberwolves were in the penalty, a correct would’ve sent Teague — who’s making 86% of his free throws this season and 84% for his career — to the line. He would’ve had two attempts to build on Indiana’s two-point lead.

Instead, he forced an off-balance shot, which Minnesota rebounded. Ricky Rubio drew a shooting foul on a 3-pointer on the other end, and his three free throws lifted the Timberwolves to a 115-114 win.

The two-minute report featured a few other missed calls: George getting away with pushing off then Wiggins getting away with fouling George on a possession where George missed anyway, Andrew Wiggins getting away with a travel on a possession where Minnesota turned the ball over anyway. But those were effectively wash’s. Dunn’s uncalled foul was the one of consequence — especially if it contributes, even in a small way, to George’s exit from the Pacers.

Edmond Sumner declares for NBA draft despite torn ACL

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Edmond Sumner has grown about five inches since high school.

That has helped turn the 6-foot-5 Xavier point guard into an intriguing NBA prospect — but also seemingly contributed to physical complications. Sumner missed nearly all of his freshman year with knee tendinitis. Then, after a promising second season and start to his third, he tore his ACL in January.

Still, he’s entering the NBA draft.

Sumner:

Rick Broering of Musketeer Report:

Like with Duke’s Harry Giles, medical testing will be huge with Sumner. But at least Giles ended the season on the court. Sumner might not be healthy at all during the pre-draft process.

Sumner looked like a borderline first-round pick before the injury. This probably pushes him into the second round.

His long strides provide impressive speed and quickness, and he’s still shifty. Add quality court vision, and his ability to drive by defenders is even more valuable.

A 6-foot-8 wingspan and good lateral mobility also help make him a quality defender.

But it’s also concerning that so much of his positives could be undermined by his knee issues, especially considering his unreliable jumper. If Sumner can’t move like he did before getting hurt, I don’t see how he sticks in the NBA.

If Sumner’s knees check out, it’s worth rolling the dice on him and hoping his jumper develops. He might even be OK without shooting range, though that’d lower his ceiling considerably.

Again, though, the first thing is examining his knees.