Brandon Bass

Brandon Bass makes Dwight Howard’s job sound easy

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On some teams, the distinction between ‘power forward’ and ‘center’ is a mere formality. After all, the more versatile the players that a coach has at his disposal, the more blurry the lines between the two positions often become.

Not so for the Orlando Magic, if only because the defensive responsibilities that accompany each positional role are so drastically different. Evan Dunlap of the Orlando Pinstriped Post had a chance to talk to Brandon Bass (who, if you’ll recall, has been studying up on his defensive rotations) about the differences between playing power forward and center on the defensive end, and Bass’ positional preference is fairly clear:

“Playing the five, you just do a lot of zone. At the four, you gotta do a lot of moving. It’s a lot of work. You gotta make two efforts: You gotta close out [on shooters], [and] get back to your man. Five? You just zone, and your man is right there rolling into you. It’s a lot different. It’s a lot tougher playing the four…Like, with Dwight [Howard], if he posts me up, I know he’s going to bang, bang, bang, hook shot, or something. Versus guarding a perimeter player, you gotta show on the pick-and-roll, then you gotta close out to the three[-point line], move your feet, and stay down. Then you probably gotta move your feet because they want to drive and pull up, or whatever.”

Who knew Dwight Howard, two-time Defensive Player of the Year, had it so easy? I mean, he “just zones.” His man is “right there rolling into [him.]” That’s Dwight, living the good life, laying out in the paint with a pair of shades and a daiquiri. Meanwhile, the Brandon Basses and Rashard Lewises of the world are out there working their tails off, operating the blender that makes Dwight’s daiquiris by running on a giant hamster wheel. While solving a Rubik’s Cube. If you’re still keeping up with this metaphor, kudos.

Bass is right though, even if he’s wrong. Is defending the 5 really that much simpler than defending the 4? Perhaps, but only because when playing the 5, one’s on-man responsibilities are less emphasized, while their help-side responsibilities are paramount. The center position may not require the same defensive range, but it does necessitate having skills worthy of being every other defender’s Plan B. Dwight (or Gortat, or Bass, or whoever is playing center in Orlando) still has to cover his man, he still has to cover the screen-and-roll, and while he’s at it, act as a safety net for each of his teammates’ botched defensive sequences.

Dwight and the Magic centers may not be chasing anyone around on the perimeter and showing at the three-point line, but I think in this case, Bass’ explanation may be a tad oversimplified.

Mike Budenholzer smirks at lawyer calling Thabo Sefolosha ‘NBA superstar’

Mike Budenholzer, Thabo Sefolosha
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The funny part, via Robert Silverman:

The substantive part:

NEW YORK (AP) — NBA player Thabo Sefolosha, who was arrested outside a New York City nightclub in April following a confrontation with police officer, has a character “of the highest order,” his head coach, Mike Budenholzer, testified Thursday.

Taking the stand as the final defense witness in Sefolosha’s trial, Budenholzer described the Atlanta Hawks guard-forward as “highly intelligent” and a “hard worker.”

When asked by defense attorney Alex Spiro to describe his character, he said it was, “of the highest order.”

“Thabo is of the highest character,” he said during brief testimony in Manhattan Criminal Court.

The Swiss national is charged with misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest charges stemming from a confrontation with officers outside a trendy Manhattan nightclub early in the morning on April 8. He has pleaded not guilty.

Officers testified this week that Sefolosha and former teammate Pero Antic repeatedly disobeyed their orders to move off the block and away from a crime scene that had been established following the earlier stabbing of another NBA player, Chris Copeland, and two women.

One of the officers also said Sefolosha lunged at an officer with his arm extended but was intercepted before making contact, eventually taken to the ground and arrested.

Sefolosha has testified that he was complying with orders and moving up the block as a particularly aggressive officer screamed profanities at him.

His attorney has argued that his client was singled out by the officer, who is white, because Sefolosha is black.

Sefolosha testified Thursday that he was trying to give money to a panhandler before entering an awaiting car when he was grabbed by police. He said his leg was kicked in the scuffle and he was taken to the ground, handcuffed and hauled to a police precinct. He suffered a fractured right leg, which forced him to miss the playoffs.

The case is the second one involving high-profile athletes accusing New York Police Department officers of wrongdoing this year. On Wednesday, the city agency charged with investigating police misconduct substantiated claims by former tennis star James Blake that an officer used excessive force when he took him to the ground last month after mistkaing Blake for a fraud suspect.

As expected, Jimmy Butler says no issue between him, Derrick Rose

Derrick Rose, Jimmy Butler
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Is the Derrick Rose/Jimmy Butler relationship nothing but puppy dogs and rainbows? No. There will be sparks between two intense competitors.

Have those sparks started a fire Bulls fans should be concerned about? A report on Wednesday said the core problem was Butler doesn’t respect Rose’s work ethic, which provided some kindling for that spark to catch.

However, as you would expect, Butler said this was all much ado about nothing, that he and Rose are all good. Via K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Spin this however you wish: Their relationship is fine and someone in the media is making this up; or their relationship has been rough, and this is all just leaking out now.

This is a Bulls team in a bit of a transition as Rose declines some and Butler has grown into a top-flight player. Clearly that dynamic has some people around the team — likely the people in one of one of the players’ camps doesn’t like the power struggle or where it leaves his buddy — talking out of school to the press.

But as Butler noted, winning cures all ills. If Chicago can get off to a fast start, nobody will be asking chemistry questions.

For now, however, tounges are wagging.