Fabricio Oberto

Fabricio Oberto is without an NBA home, but still turns down offer from Turkish team

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Few names in the NBA demand the respect of “Fabricio Oberto,” as long as “respect” is measured in smirks, sighs, and knowing guffaws. The Argentinian big man, who played for the Washington Wizards last season, has had a tidy, victorious, and fairly unproductive career as a late-arrival to the American basketball scene. Oberto was a rookie with the Spurs at age 30, and it was in that season that he began carving out a tenure as a limited player in most respects — too slow to play consistent defense, too limited offensively to pose too much of a threat, too unathletic to be much of a presence on the boards — that still managed to get the job done.

Break down Oberto’s stats however you’d like and they still disappoint, yet his smart play, interior passing, and knack for hustle made him a starter on the title-winning Spurs in 2007. Nothing can take away that ring, even if Oberto was that starting lineup’s undeniable weak link.

Oberto has only seen two contracts in his NBA life. He signed a deal with the Spurs back in 2005, and then agreed to a one-year stint with Washington last year for a fairly minimal salary. There was a possibility that the Wizards may bring Fab back for his third NBA contract, but with their young bigs locked into place and ready to log serious minutes, his services are no longer needed there. Unsurprisingly, the rest of the market felt similarly, and Oberto’s limited skill set didn’t demand an NBA salary even in an off-season riddled with exorbitance. $20 million makes sense for Darko, after all, but for an older center with a superior career averages in rebounds, assists, and turnovers per 36 minutes as well as field goal percentage, even the league minimum was apparently too much to ask.

But hey, David Kahn can’t overpay for every center on the market.

With no offers to remain stateside, Oberto is left to sort through various overseas possibilities, but apparently none have tickled his fancy. Most recently: According to The Hoops Market, Turkish club Efes Pilsen offered Oberto a three-month deal to fill in for injured big man Miroslav Raduljica, which he declined due to its abbreviated length. Even without offers from top European teams, Oberto is still in the market for a longer (read: full-season) deal. Time isn’t on Oberto’s side, though, as basketball season is gearing up not only in the United States, but in Europe, as well.

Supposing that Oberto did indeed reject the offer from Efes Pilsen to play the waiting game on a better offer, he may soon be short on realistic long-term options. Some teams may be interested based on Oberto’s international reputation alone (he’s a valued member of the Argentine national team), but it’s not inconceivable that Fabricio could sit out a year or retire from the game for good if he doesn’t receive an offer to his liking.

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.