While Gilbert Arenas pens his redemption story, Javaris Crittenton is just looking to get by

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javaris_crittenton_wizards_bobcats.jpgGilbert Arenas and Javaris Crittenton will forever be linked by a card game, two unloaded guns, and a note in the Washington Wizards’ locker room, but both players were in fundamentally different positions to deal with the aftermath of their shared experience.

Arenas is a former superstar that once dined with the league’s true elite. He’s also due $80 million over the next four seasons, which makes him both a difficult player to deal and an impossible one to cut. It didn’t make sense for the Wizards to part ways with Arenas even after his various displays of irresponsibility, and now he’s an important part of the roster that will usher in a new era for the Wizards.

Gil is reinventing himself. Or learning from his mistakes. Or showing maturity. Or…something. Regardless, Arenas has a chance to make his narrative whole, and ride out what should be a few more seasons with the Wizards.

Crittenton? He was done in Washington the day he made headlines. Critt has talent, but as an unfocused (in terms of skill), atypical guard without much career production, he wasn’t deemed worth the headache, nor did he have a contract that made him so. So the Wizards waved goodbye after Crittenton served his 38-game suspension, and we sat wondering whether one bizarre incident would destroy Crittenton’s career before it had a chance to truly begin.

It didn’t, at least for now. The Charlotte Bobcats invited Crittenton to training camp with their problematic point guard rotation in mind. D.J. Augustin, who struggled last season, is the starter by default, and his primary backup, Shaun Livingston, is already having trouble staying healthy. Should Crittenton work his way onto Charlotte’s roster, there will be opportunities aplenty for minutes throughout the season, be they with Livingston sidelined or Augustin inconsistent.

Crittenton’s own health is an issue, too. A left ankle injury has hindered Crittenton for some time, in part because of a botched surgery, per Crittenton’s estimation (via the Associated Press):

…Brown also didn’t know if he was healthy, an issue that got little
attention because of his legal problems. Crittenton said he had a bone
spur in his left ankle at the beginning of last season and underwent
surgery. “It didn’t go well,” Crittenton said. “They went in from
the wrong way and it didn’t fix it. I had another surgery to actually
repair it.”

Instead of being sidelined for few weeks, Crittenton was out for the season.

lot of people think I had one surgery and, ‘Oh, it’s taking a long time
to heal,'” Crittenton said. “If the first surgery was successful, I
would have been ready.”

The 38-game suspension at the end of the
season made that moot. It also meant he wasn’t returning to Washington,
and Charlotte marks his fourth team in four years. “I do feel
like I really haven’t gotten my shot yet,” Crittenton said. “I really
wasn’t one of those players who could really learn from watching. But
it’s the NBA. This is the decision I chose. I left college early and I
just have to learn. There’s no more being babied or anything like that.”

The surgery doesn’t even matter at this point. Crittenton needs to be ready now, because isn’t likely to have many other NBA lifelines.

Sadly, this could be it for Crittenton. His involvement in the Arenas gun incident is just the kind of Wikipedia-worthy trivia that could prematurely terminate his NBA career. Crittenton’s future training camp/tryout opportunities could be very limited, which makes it all the more important that his chance with the Bobcats doesn’t go south. With good coaching and the right system, Critt could be a valuable rotation player. Here’s to hoping that happens in the NBA (and in Charlotte, for that matter, where Larry Brown could really help him), rather than overseas. 

Rumor: Houston seeing if there is trade market for Ty Lawson

Ty Lawson

While it does happen — and the ones that do happen tend to be bigger names — December is not a time the NBA does a lot of trades. Team GMs are always willing to talk, listen, and get a feel for the market, but it’s not until after the first of the year — and closer to the February trade deadline — before the market picks up momentum.

But there are always trade rumors, and the well-connected Steve Kyler over at BasketballInisiders.com had an interesting one — the Houston Rockets might be open to moving Ty Lawson.

The Rockets have been sniffing around the league for deals and there is a belief among other teams that Lawson could be had in trade, and had cheaply. Lawson is owed $12.4 million this season with the final $13.21 million of his deal being fully non-guaranteed.

As the Rockets search for ways to change, there is a belief that Lawson could be the first Rocket player moved. But given how poorly Lawson has played in Houston and his troublesome off-the-court history, it’s hard to imagine that Lawson alone is going to yield much in return. But as teams start to get desperate, Lawson does have a career assist average of more than 6.5 assists per game and averaged 9.6 per game last season for the Nuggets.

The Rockets are 10.4 points per 100 possessions better this season when Lawson is on the bench rather than starting. Lawson and James Harden — both of whom need the ball in their hands to be most effective — get outscored by 9.3 points per 100 possession when they are paired.  Pair Lawson with Dwight Howard and the Rockets are -11.4 per 100.

The Rockets clearly need to shake things up, and firing coach Kevin McHale and bringing in J.B. Bickerstaff has not been the answer. They have serious effort issues, which leads to real locker room chemistry questions. If they move Lawson, with that salary they should get a player of some value in return. If a good team loses a point guard to injury, Lawson could be a viable alternative.

Moving Lawson would be no magic bullet for Houston right now, but don’t be shocked if you hear a lot Lawson rumors as the trade deadline nears.

LeBron James on not facing Kobe Bryant in Finals: “I didn’t hold up my end”

Kobe Bryant, LeBron James
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It was the matchup everyone wanted to see — LeBron James and the Cavaliers against Kobe Bryant and the Lakers in the NBA Finals. You can be sure the suits at ESPN/ABC wanted to see it.

Never happened. It felt like it would in 2009, but LeBron and the Cavs ran into a Magic team they could not defend and fell short. Kobe vs. LeBron never happened on the NBA’s biggest stage.

LeBron blames himself he said Tuesday, as reported by the Akron Beacon Journal.

“I didn’t hold up my end of the bargain,” James said of 2009, when the Cavs were upset by the Orlando Magic in the conference finals. “I know the world wanted to see it. I wanted it, he wanted it. He held up his end, I didn’t hold up my end and I hate that. I hate that it didn’t happen.”

LeBron was phenomenal in that series, but this was a team he could not carry all the way. In Game 1 he had 49 points on 20-of-30 shooting, plus dished out eight assists, and pulled down six rebounds — and the Cavaliers still lost. LeBron had a 59.1 true shooting percentage for the series despite a ridiculous 38 usage rate. The problem was his teammates had no answers for Stan Van Gundy’s offense with Dwight Howard in the paint and four shooters around him, plus Hedo Turkoglu playing the best ball of his career off the pick-and-roll.

Bottom line, LeBron you shouldn’t blame yourself. I’d say blame Cavaliers management, but clearly you did a summer later when you took your talent to South Beach. At least you ultimately learned to forgive.


Report: Phil Jackson would have taken Okafor over Porzingis. Duh.

New York Knicks Draft Picks Press Conference

Of course he would have — 29 other GMs would have as well.

Jackson also seriously would have considered trading the No. 4 pick if the right package of picks — including Brooklyn’s unprotected pick from this season — were part of the package. Again, that’s not a surprise or even a poor decision.

But in New York, which has fallen in love with the guy they used that No. 4 pick on in Kristaps Porzingis, that idea has become news, especially in the wake of No. 3 pick Jahlil Okafor‘s recent run of off-the-court issues. Here is the report, via the New York Post.

According to an NBA source, as much as Jackson’s top adviser, Clarence Gaines Jr., wanted Jackson to take Porzingis even if the Knicks had the No. 1 pick, that wasn’t the way the Zen Master would have gone if it was a choice between the two big men.

Okafor was Jackson’s man.

“He had to draft Okafor — too much a sure thing,’’ the source said.

Again, 29 other GMs would have done the same thing at that time. Now, maybe it changes, but at the time anyone who tells you differently is selling something.

It’s not that some of those GMs (and certainly some of their scouts) didn’t think Porzingis could develop into an excellent NBA player, but he was considered a higher risk pick than Okafor, who is averaging 17.5 points a game for the Sixers and looks like a franchise cornerstone player. Maybe Porzingis had a higher ceiling, but Okafor had a way higher floor. If your job is on the line with a draft pick, you think about the floor.

Has Okafor had some incidents off the court? Obviously. He’s a 19-year-old making decisions that put in situations where bad things happen. That’s correctable. We all made stupid decisions when we were 19, just most of us grew out of them. (Well, if you ask my wife whether I did or not…) He likely will to, his handlers are already making significant steps.

Zach Lowe at Grantland said that the Knicks did consider trading the pick, but the deal never came close to fruition.

The Celtics were hell-bent on moving up to draft Justise Winslow, and offered the Hornets four first-round picks — including one of Brooklyn’s unprotected picks — for Charlotte’s No. 9 pick. But that was Boston’s fall-back plan, sources say. Boston initially chased Charlotte’s pick with the idea of sending it to the Knicks, along with Boston’s No. 15 pick, to vault all the way into New York’s draft slot — where they would take Winslow. Charlotte refused Boston’s pitches, and the scenario died. The Knicks downplay their interest in Boston’s offer, though it’s fascinating to consider how the draft might have played out — and which fan base would be chanting “POR-ZIN-GIS!” today — had the Celtics swooped in for Winslow at No. 4

“We listened,” Mills says. “But we were never close.”

Now, looking back at it, Knicks fans wouldn’t trade any of it.


Pistons’ Reggie Jackson fined $25,000 for what he told OKC heckler

Reggie Jackson, Shane Larkin
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Reggie Jackson, now the starting point guard for the Detroit Pistons, returned to face the team that drafted him last weekend, the Oklahoma City Thunder. The reception was chilly, to put it kindly. Both from the players and the fans.

Jackson responded to one of the heckling fans with an indecent suggestion (if you want to see the incident, you can, but it’s NSFW) and that has earned him a $25,000 fine from the league. The punishment was sent down by Kiki VanDeWeghe, Executive Vice President, Basketball Operations.

This shouldn’t be a surprise, the league has a pretty clear policy that fans pay the freight and can say nearly anything to players (it is up to the discretion of security at the arena, teams can ask to have fans removed if needed), and the players have to take it. Answer them with better play on the court.

Jackson has had a good season for the Pistons averaging 19.1 points and 6.7 assists a game, showing a real chemistry with Andre Drummond. He is part of the reason the Pistons look like a potential playoff team this season and are on the rise in the East. But the Thunder got the best of him that night (Jackson shot 4-of-16 and was -19), and so did a fan.