Winderman: It's okay not to get excited about the World Championships

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Thumbnail image for usa_durant_rose_iguodala.jpgAs the telltale economic numbers will eventually show, productivity was down across America on Wednesday afternoon. Such is the result of a nation shutting down to catch the riveting drama that is U.S.-Greece international basketball.

Or not.

Somehow, we’re having a hard time getting caught up in World Championships fever.

So, for that matter, apparently is the Worldwide Leader, which will broadcast Saturday’s U.S. opener in Turkey on ESPN Classic just after women’s tennis from 1984 and just before college football from 2005. Apparently, filler was needed without another timeless episode of Stump the Schwab being available.

Look, I, like just about anyone else who stops by this space, could and would watch basketball 24/7/365.

But based on the roster the NBA (known as USA Basketball this time of year) has put together, exactly what type of World Championship is this?

The World Championship of Guys Who Mostly Never Will Be All-Stars?

Is it so wrong to admit that for this country the Olympics are everything?

Can an event have any significance if the last time your country won gold it had Derrick Coleman on its roster?

Considering we still have two more weeks of exhibition football, there is something to be said about sporting sustenance.

But also appreciate that unless the United States wins the gold medal, the event will provide no tangible benefit to what matters most for USA Basketball (otherwise known as the NBA the rest of the year) when it comes to the ultimate goal, gold at the 2012 London Games.

Only the World Championships champion receives an automatic Olympic berth. For everyone else, it’s back to regional qualifying in 2011, which, for the U.S., would mean next summer’s Tournament of the Americas in Argentina.

Consider also that there are four knockout rounds in Turkey, plenty of chances for that one slip-up.

As for “development” and “cohesion” and “camaraderie” and all those other Colangelo-Krzyzewski buzzwords we’ve been hearing this past month, how many members of this current roster truly are expected to be with the U.S. in London in 2012, when space will be cleared for Dwyane and Dwight, Kobe and Carmelo, among others?

How exactly is Derrick Rose running the floor with Kevin Love going to enhance his alley-oops to LeBron James?

Wednesday, America forced itself back to work after the artistry that was U.S. vs. Greece.

Saturday, just after Martina faces Chrissie on ESPN Classic (no spoiler alert necessary, we won’t give away the result), and just before a five-year old Wolverines-Cornhuskers game is shown, the United States will participate in something that is being portrayed as part of its road to the Olympics.

But it’s not.

It’s just exhibition basketball.

Ira Winderman writes regularly for NBCSports.com and covers the Heat and the NBA for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Chris Paul finds brilliant counter to hack-a-DeAndre Jordan (video)

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I originally favored allowing Hack-a-Shaq as the NBA currently does. I found the strategy fascinated – why and when teams would use it and how their opponents would counter.

But it just became too common. Far too many games featured a parade of trips to the line, a boring stretch that made games too long. I thought the intrigue had run its course.

Then, Chris Paul pulled this move last night.

The Clippers guard saw Jonas Jerebko charging toward DeAndre Jordan to commit an intentional foul, so Paul stepped in front of an unsuspecting Jerebko and took the foul himself. That’s sent a good free-throw shooter to the line instead of the dismal Jordan.

Just an awesome heady play by Paul.

PBT Podcast: NBA All-Star Weekend talk, predictions with Sean Highkin

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NBA All-Star weekend descends upon frigid Toronto starting Friday, with everything from the Rookie/Sophomore… er, Rising Stars Challenge on Friday, the Dunk Contest/Three-Point Contest on Saturday, and the main event on Sunday.

Kurt Helin and Sean Highkin of NBC’s ProBasketballTalk break it all down, from Pau Gasol replacing Jimmy Butler to predictions on the Dunk Contest and if anyone can knock off Zach LaVine. Plus, there is plenty of “why Sting?” talk.

PBT will be in Toronto with reports from the event all weekend, so come back early and often for all the latest (plus trade talk, as all the GMs get together in one city where it’s too cold for them to go outside).

As always, you can listen to the podcast below, or listen and subscribe via iTunesdownload it directly here, or you can check out our new PBT Podcast homepage, which has the most recent episodes available. If you have the Stitcher app, you can listen there as well.

Pistons retire Chauncey Billups’ jersey at halftime (VIDEO)

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AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — Moments before his jersey went up to the rafters, Chauncey Billups spoke to the crowd about the night the Detroit Pistons wrapped up the 2004 NBA title by routing the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 5 of the Finals.

“We had one motivation,” he said. “We wanted to win it here at home.”

Billups was the most valuable player in the Finals that year, and he had his No. 1 jersey retired by the Pistons on Wednesday night at halftime of their game against Denver.

He was the second player from that 2004 team honored by the Pistons this year. The Pistons retired Ben Wallace’s jersey last month at a similar ceremony – in front of a packed house on a night Detroit beat Golden State.

There were some empty seats in the upper level Wednesday, but Billups wanted to be honored while the Pistons were playing the Nuggets. Billups is a Denver native and played for the Nuggets for two stints during his career.

“This was by design, only because there’s a lot of people that contributed to my success as a player and as a man, in Denver, my hometown,” Billups said before the game. “There were several dates that I could have chosen. This one obviously stuck out.”

Billups does have a mild regret about his run of success with the Pistons. He figures they could have won more titles.

“I felt like, two and maybe three championships – we were that good,” he said.

Ben Wallace was on hand Wednesday, and so were Richard Hamilton, Rasheed Wallace and Tayshaun Prince from the 2004 champions. Pistons great Isiah Thomas was also at the Palace for the ceremony.

“This is what tradition looks like,” Thomas told the crowd. “This is what it feels like.”