Team USA, player-by-player and role-by-role (Part Two)

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durant_team_usa.jpgNow that Team USA’s roster is finalized, it’s time to break down
exactly what each of Team USA’s 12 players will be asked to do. Some
members of Team USA are simply acting as an extension of their NBA
selves, but others have seen their responsibilities shift due to the
team’s needs, the overall makeup of the roster, and the nature of FIBA
basketball. In this second installment, we’ll look at the starting candidates for Team USA.

Derrick Rose – Rose started in Rondo’s stead during Sunday’s friendly against Spain, and figures to be Team USA’s starting point guard (at least, as much as this team really has one specific point guard) for most of the World Championships. Rose’s primary value is his scoring; though he can make plays off the dribble, it’s the threat of the drive and the mid-range jumper that could open things up for Team USA.

Rose isn’t a skilled three-point shooter, and that hurts him. When opposing defenses zone up or pack the paint, he’ll likely struggle to create shots for both himself and his teammates. Still, he’s smart enough to make the right plays and pick his spots, and he will. Rose is a weapon. He’s valuable and effective, even if he lacks Rondo’s abilities as a natural playmaker.
 
Chauncey Billups – Billups is both a veteran and scorer for Team USA, which badly needs his precision from the perimeter as well as his leadership. While the roster is certainly guard-heavy, most of those guards are resolved to win the day in a straight-line footrace. Billups is a bit more deliberate in his approach. A bit more methodical. He may ultimately succumb to the same vices (Chauncey is no stranger to the heat check), but the contrast between Billups and the other guards on the roster benefits Team USA all the same.

The Americans’ turnovers have been absolutely brutal thus far, but Billups — a slip-up against Lithuania aside — provides a calming influence on Team USA’s offense. He’s a prolific threat from deep (7-of-13 in the last three exhibition games, good for 53.8%), a strong defender, and unlikely to commit those facepalm-inducing turnovers that have become a Rose/Westbrook staple.

Andre Iguodala – Andre Iguodala will not be scoring much. He’s averaged just 3.7 points per game over USA’s last three exhibitions. No one should expect that to improve significantly.

However, Iguodala does have utility that goes beyond his defense. Iggy is easily Team USA’s top perimeter defender, but offensively, he moves the ball, is a decent spot-up option (just don’t ask him to shoot off the dribble…yeesh), and is a good positional rebounder. Iguodala’s just a dabbler. A little ball-handling, a little slashing, a lot of fast breaking, and a ton of fantastic defense.

Kevin Durant – Kevin Durant owns this team. He’s not renting it out while LeBron goes on vacation. He’s taken it and made it his own, for better or worse. Though Durant didn’t hand-pick his Team USA contemporaries, the roster was constructed with the hope that it would resemble KD. His versatility. His athleticism. His character. Jerry Colangelo and Mike Krzyzewski clearly hoped that Durant’s nature would act as a thematic element for Team USA, and to an extent it has.

The only trouble is that no one on this year’s team has the talent to actually keep up with Durant, even if their commitment and intangibles follow through on the motif.

Durant hasn’t been the most consistent in his pre-Championship exhibitions, but he was in full effect against Spain, the United States’ most formidable foe. KD finished with 25 and 10 in that contest on 56.3% shooting, dropped a couple of threes, and picked up the game-saving block for good measure.

Durant is the only Team USA player that’s elite by NBA standards, and on this team his brilliance is crucial as both a driving force (KD will need to be fantastic against USA’s top opponents) and a beacon to his teammates. 
 
Tyson Chandler – Chandler is the only true center on the roster, which should be good enough to score him some regular playing time. However, as Krzyzewski proved in fiddling with Sunday’s starting lineup, Chandler’s positional standing in no way guarantees him a starting job. Coach K benched Rajon Rondo in favor of Derrick Rose, which was clearly a significant roster move. In the same game, he also brought Tyson Chandler off the bench to start Lamar Odom, who could very well tip-off at center for Team USA from this point on.

Regardless, Chandler will fulfill the same basic duties for the national team regardless of his starting status. He’s a quality rim protector, even if he doesn’t pick up a ton of blocks. His length and athleticism make him a quality all-around defender, even if he’s had some lapses in the exhibition games thus far. Overall, he’s the Americans best on-ball post defender, a good option to defend pick-and-roll bigs, and a solid defensive anchor, even if he’s something of an offensive liability.

Lamar Odom – The impact of Odom being a perimeter-oriented big is a bit overstated. Odom has never been anything more than a decent shooter from outside (he’s gone 0-fer in his first four attempts from deep for Team USA), and he really isn’t floating too much on the outside at present. And though Odom may initiate the offense frequently for the Lakers, that’s not his role on this team. Not with so many dynamic guards on the roster.

Instead, Odom is…oddly conventional in his capacity with Team USA. He screens-and-rolls, he plays nice help-side defense, and he rebounds well. It may not be the most creative way to utilize Odom’s unique skill set, but so far he’s been quite effective while masquerading as a traditional big. 

Get out of my head: Golden State routs Cleveland in last regular season meeting before Finals

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No regular season game is going to erase the memory of blowing a 3-1 NBA Finals lead.

No January game is an accurate crystal ball into an NBA Finals matchup.

But the Warriors can put to rest the “Cleveland is in their heads” rhetoric and take a little confidence away from an absolute drubbing of the NBA Champions on national television Monday night.

Golden State caught fire midway through the first quarter and led by 15 after one, put up 78 points in the first half to lead by 29 at the break, and it all happened so fast it left Tyronn Lue’s face as the meme of the night.

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From there, the Warriors cruised in (sloppily at times, but cruised) for the 126-91 win.

“It was very important to come out and get off to a good start, but more importantly to hold on to that, to continue to keep our foot on the gas,” Draymond Green, speaking to the blown leads issue in his postgame TNT interview. “We did that the entire night, they had one little stretch there, I think it was the end of the third quarter, but other than that we kept our foot on the gas the entire time.”

Everyone in a Warriors uniform looked sharp. Klay Thompson had 26 points and hit 5-of-11 from three. Kevin Durant had 21 points on 9-of-16 shooting. Stephen Curry had 20 points and 11 assists. Green had a triple-double with 11 points, 13 rebounds, and 11 assists.

Conversely, for the Cavaliers LeBron James, Kyrie Irving, and Kevin Love were a combined 13-of-43 (30.2 percent shooting), with just five assists to 13 turnovers between them. As a team, the Cavaliers shot 35.2 percent overall and 9-of-34 from three (26.5 percent). Love didn’t play in the second half due to lower back soreness.

The Cavaliers looked like the team on the last night of a six-game road trip counting the minutes until they got back home, which is exactly what they were.

Neither side thinks this game portends anything going forward.

“It wasn’t about sending a message,” Green said in his interview. “At the end of the day, that’s the defending champs, we played them guys in two straight Finals, you’re not sending a message with a regular season win.”

That doesn’t mean it doesn’t feel good for the Warriors (and is cathartic for their fans).

The only real moment of drama in the game was when Green shouldered LeBron to the ground in the second quarter and picked up a Flagrant 1 for his efforts.

Golden State started the game slow, getting good looks but shooting just 1-of-7 from three. Still, it felt like with the looks they were getting the shots would fall at some point, and they did as the Warriors hit six of their next eight from deep. Cleveland tried to match but found that rhythm, shooting 2-of-12 from three early. With the hot shooting the Warriors stretched the lead up as high as 22, but the Cavaliers had Richard Jefferson come in and muck the game up, LeBron started attacking off the drive, and they cut the lead down to 14.

Then the Warriors got a couple of live-ball turnovers — including Curry stripping LeBron — and converted those to fast-break buckets the other way, then all that was left was Lue looking dazed. The Warriors were moving the ball and not getting sucked into isolation, racking up 26 first half assists. The Warriors also were out and running and had 34 fast break points in the first half — credit Golden State for pushing the tempo, but the Cavaliers transition defense was a horror show. And not in a cool, “Let the Right One In” kind of way, but in the “Cavs fans never want to see that again” kind of way. Dazed Lue is right there with them.

No more meetings between these teams until the Finals we all expect to see. It’s six months of these teams getting better, trying to stay healthy, and gaining confidence going into that series. Cleveland has plenty of confidence. Golden State just got a little more.

Jeff Teague, Paul George help Pacers hold off Pelicans 98-95

Indiana Pacers' Paul George is defended by New Orleans Pelicans' Jrue Holiday during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Associated Press
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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Pacers guard Jeff Teague figures he’ll eventually get that elusive triple-double.

Until then, he’s content to pile up wins.

For the fourth time in 30 days, the former All-Star guard flirted with his first career triple-double and Paul George scored 20 points to help the Indiana Pacers hold off the New Orleans Pelicans 98-95. Teague finished with 16 points, 10 assists and eight rebounds – the closest he’s come yet this season.

“I’m happy I’m getting some rebounds,” Teague said. “I was one of the worst rebounders last year, so to actually get some rebounds this year is good.”

The Pacers rebounded from Thursday’s embarrassing performance in London by leading almost wire to wire. They trailed only once, at 2-0, and were only tied just three times – twice in the first 66 seconds and at 91 with 4:10 left in the game.

And Teague was a big reason why the Pacers managed to keep the Pelicans at arm’s distance.

The other reason: Anthony Davis‘ injury.

New Orleans’ All-Star center took a hard tumble with 7:08 left in the third quarter when he appeared to be leaping for an uncontested dunk. Myles Turner raced over, hit Davis on the right wrist, sent him sprawling. After Davis got up, he limped toward midcourt before making two free throws and being replaced by Terrence Jones.

Davis finished with a team high 16 points but did not return. Team officials said he injured his right thumb and left hip and that X-rays were negative. Davis left with a slight limp but did not speak with reporters.

“I don’t know anything yet, we’ll check with the doctors,” coach Alvin Gentry said.

Without Davis, the Pelicans couldn’t quite come all the way back from a 14-point deficit in the first quarter or two 10-point deficits in the third quarter.

Teague broke the 91-91 with a 3-pointer with 3:55 to play and New Orleans had three chances to tie the score in the final 20 seconds.

But Jrue Holiday missed a 22-foot pull-up jumper, E'Twaun Moore missed a short runner with 4.8 seconds left and Tyreke Evans fired up an air ball from the corner as the buzzer sounded.

“We let them hang around without their star on the floor,” George said. “We’re floating around .500. We’ve got to get some consistency, we’ve got to find a way.”

TIP-INS

Pelicans: Moore and Jones each had 15 points. Jones also had eight rebounds. … Solomon Hill had four points and four rebounds in his first trip back to Indiana since leaving the Pacers in free agency. … The Pelicans were 6 of 9 on 3-pointers in the second quarter after scoring only 18 points in the first.

Pacers: Myles Turner had his eighth double-double of the season – 18 points and 12 rebounds. He also had four blocks. … Thaddeus Young left in the first half after getting poked in the left eye but returned at the start of the third quarter. He finished with 17 points and tied a season-high with six steals. … Indiana won despite missing four of its last six free throws. … Pacers guard Rodney Stuckey (sore left hamstring) hasn’t played since Dec. 28 and coach Nate McMillan said before the game he isn’t expected to play on Indiana’s upcoming three-game road trip.

FATHER-SON MATCHUP

Pacers coach Nate McMillan didn’t want Monday’s game to turn into an emotional father-son matchup. So after having dinner Sunday with his son, Jamelle, an assistant with the Pelicans, the Pacers coach told his son the same thing he always has.

“We’re both trying to win,” the father said. “That way it’s not a father-son deal. He’s been taught to go out there and win.”

But the elder McMillan was surprised this day even came. When he was asked if he ever discussed the intricacies of coaching with his son, McMillan quipped: “No, I didn’t. I thought he’d be smarter than that.”

HOME, SWEET, HOME

The Pacers have won five straight on their home court and have the second best home record in the Eastern Conference at 16-5. And New Orleans knows how tough it is to play at Indiana. The Pelicans have lost seven straight at Indy since their last win in January 2010.

 

Draymond Green picks up flagrant foul for shoulder hit to LeBron (VIDEO)

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If this were the NFL, that would be a clean tackle — led with his shoulder, not his helmet.

Turns out in the NBA, that’s not allowed.

Draymond Green picked up a Flagrant 1 foul for the hit above on LeBron James. It was a transition play, and Green came in looking for a steal and maybe to send a little message, and in doing so dropped LeBron with a shoulder. You can see the video above.

Green also appears to mock LeBron for flopping.

The refs got this right (sorry Chris Webber). Did LeBron sell that call a little? Sure. But that was unnecessary contact, the exact definition of a Fragrant 1. Sorry Cavs fans, but that was not excessive and deserving of an ejection.

The Warriors torched the Cavaliers in the first half putting up 34 fast break points, racking up 26 assists, and leading 78-49. You read that score right. That’s at the half.

Adam Silver refutes George Karl: No reason to believe NBA has steroid issue

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 12:  NBA commissioner, Adam Silver speaks during a press conference prior to the NBA match between Indiana Pacers and Denver Nuggets at the O2 Arena on January 12, 2017 in London, England.  (Photo by Dan Mullan/Getty Images)
Dan Mullan/Getty Images
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George Karl alleged the NBA has a steroid issue.

NBA commissioner Adam Silver, via USA Today:

I’ll just say our testing is state of the art. I have no reason to believe whatsoever that we have an issue, either as the result of testing or as the result of other information that comes to the league office.

“I’d say that in most sports where there are issues, even when players do not test positive, usually there is some chatter that there is something going on. Other than what George Karl wrote in his book, there is no chatter whatsoever in the league. Obviously, many reporters are in this room who cover the NBA; presumably if they thought there was an issue, they would be writing about it.

“Having said that, we take allegations of performance-enhancing drugs or drug abuse of any kind incredibly seriously. I’m sure we will go through George Karl’s book, others, not me, in the league office, word by word, suggestion by suggestion, and ferret out whether there’s anything to it.

“For us, it doesn’t matter what the source is. If somebody is — especially if it’s a Hall of Fame-caliber coach registering those sort of allegations against the league, we will take them seriously. But standing here today, I have absolutely no reason to believe there’s any truth to those allegations.”

The NBA tests for performance-enhancing drugs, and those tests have produced few positive results, especially by stars. If the league believes in its process, that should say everything as far as Silver is concerned.

But drug-testing is a never-ending game of cat and mouse. Drug developers will find ways to beat testers, who will adjust with new tests, which will prompt the other side to create new drugs and masking agents, which…

Is the NBA ahead of the curve right now? Silver says it is.

He better be right. He’ll look mighty foolish if he’s not.