Rajon Rondo may be teetering on the Team USA bubble

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team_usa_rondo_rose.jpgRajon Rondo’s DNP against Spain on Sunday could be read a number of ways. For my part, I naturally assumed that Rondo — who had started for Team USA up to that point and remains the team’s top perimeter defender and most natural playmaker — was held out in an act of gamesmanship by Mike Krzyzewski. Rondo seems to have read the situation a bit differently.

From Chris Sheridan of ESPN.com:

Somebody is going to get cut from Team USA after Wednesday night’s exhibition game against Greece, and Rajon Rondo has no illusions about where he stands. “I
think I’m on the bubble,” Rondo said Tuesday. “Just looking at the
obvious — I got a DNP last game. That pretty much speaks for itself.”

After losing his job as the starting point guard to Derrick Rose
last weekend in Madrid, Rondo’s stock has fallen to the point where it
now appears he is third on the point guard depth chart behind Rose and Russell Westbrook.

…”It’s not so much what Rajon has to show, it’s what our team needs.
We’ve found a good lineup, and the international game is so different
from the NBA game, you can ask any of these guys,” Krzyzewski said.
“Part of it is to make sure that we try not to have two non-shooters
out on the court, and there’s the physicality, too.”

Sheridan also notes that Krzyzewski seemed to indicate that Stephen Curry’s roster spot is not in jeopardy. That would leave the presumed bubble list to include Rondo, Eric Gordon, Russell Westbrook, and possibly Danny Granger and Kevin Love, as well. After all, if Rondo’s DNP against Spain is significant, why wouldn’t Granger and Love (who also didn’t play on Sunday) be safe?

Rondo certainly has his limitations (particularly on this roster, which is already saturated with guards), but his defensive value should have put him a step above Russell Westbrook. That clearly hasn’t happened, and Rondo’s turnovers and lack of a shooting stroke are no doubt to blame. K wisely bemoans having too many non-shooters on the floor at once, which isn’t just one of those quirky FIBA problems, but a very real quandary on just about every level of basketball.

Lithuania packed the paint against Team USA, and putting Rondo on the floor empowers other opponents to do the same. Tyson Chandler isn’t going to launch jumpers. Andre Iguodala and Lamar Odom are far too inconsistent from outside to be counted on. The number of reliable shooters on the roster is already a bit thin, which could make cutting Rondo — and saving Gordon or Granger, for example, in the process — an understandable move.

I just don’t think it’s the right one. It’s clear that regardless of which player has the honor of being the final cut, Team USA will struggle at times offensively. That makes the Americans’ pressure defense even more important; not only does their defensive philosophy hide the limited supply of bigs on Team USA’s bench, but also it also creates more offense to compensate for those aforementioned struggles. That’s where Rondo is an unquestionable boon. Maybe he is a bit careless with his passes and a bit wild with his jumper, but Team USA can live with both of those things as long as he steps up defensively.

Rondo doesn’t need to play alongside Derrick Rose or Russell Westbrook. He just needs to play. 

Dwyane Wade serious as mentor, teaching Justise Winslow post moves

Third day of Miami Heat camp 10/1/2015
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Dwyane Wade has earned his status as an elder statesman, the E.F. Hutton kind of veteran who speaks and everybody listens.

Rookie Justise Winslow is listening.

Winslow (who should have gone higher in this draft) is a perfect fit for the Heat and he’s going to be part of their rotation off the bench from the start of the season (along with Josh McRoberts and Amare Stoudemire). Wade has already fully stepped into the mentor role with Winslow working with him on post moves, reports Jason Lieser at the Palm Beach Post.

“As his career develops, hopefully he’s able to do multiple things on the floor, but right now there’s gonna be certain things (Erik Spoelstra) wants him to do, and some of those things I’m good at,” Wade said. “I’m just passing down knowledge to someone who I think could be good at things that I have strengths at. It’s gonna take a while, but if he figures it out at 21, he’s ahead of the curve. I figured it out at like 27.

“All of us are where we’re at because someone before us helped us. They helped by letting us sit there and watch film with them or having conversations with them. If he’s a student of it and he really wants to know, I’m a pretty decent teacher in certain areas.”

This is what you want out of a veteran leader and some of the young teams out there have done an excellent job adding this kind of mentor — Kevin Garnett in Minnesota may be the best example. Someone who can pass on his wisdom and show the team’s young players how to be a professional and win in the NBA.

It’s a little different for Winslow, he and the Heat are more in a win-now mode, but he should be able to contribute to that.

NBA All-Star, champion Bill Bridges dies at age 76

ATLANTA - 1968:  Bill Bridges#10 of the Atlanta Hawks poses for a portrait circa 1968 in Atlanta, Georgia. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 1968 NBAE (Photo by NBA Photo Library/NBAE via Getty Images)

Bill Bridges, a star as a Kansas Jayhawk who went on to have a 12-year NBA career that included being part of the 1975 Golden State Warriors championship team, has passed away, according to the University of Kansas.

Bridges was an undersized power forward at 6’6″ but he was a beast on the boards who averaged 11.9 rebounds a game for his career and more than 13 a game for six straight years at the peak of his career. That 11.9 per game average is still 27th all-time in NBA history.

A New Mexico native, Bridges was a three-time All-Star (all as a member of the Hawks), two-time All-NBA Defensive team, and was part of the 1975 Warriors title team. Besides the Hawks (St. Louis and Atlanta) and Warriors, Bridges played for the Sixers and Lakers.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends.