The Flip Side: Dell Demps' attempt to appease Chris Paul


chris_paul.jpgYesterday’s four-way trade
saw just about every team involved walk away a winner. However, the
effects of that trade are far more specific than just saying “This team
got better,” or “This team accomplished its goals.” In The Flip Side,
we’ll look at one player from each of the four teams — the Nets, the
Pacers, the Hornets, and the Rockets — and how their career is
impacted by the move in both the immediate and distant future.

Chris Paul wants out of New Orleans. Newly-anointed Hornets GM Dell Demps acquires Trevor Ariza in exchange for James Posey and upstart point guard Darren Collison. Chris Paul still, probably, wants out of New Orleans.

The Hornets’ intent here was obvious, but if scoring Trevor Ariza is the endgame of the team’s plan to convince Chris Paul to stay home, someone miscalculated. Badly.

There’s honestly nothing wrong with Ariza. He’s a fine athlete, a good perimeter defender, a so-so three-point shooter, and a perfectly useful cog as long as he’s not asked to power the machine. The more responsibility Ariza holds in the offense, the worse off both he and the team are going to be. He’s just not a dynamic offensive talent, and that’s fine.

Because what Ariza is — a perfectly average player — comes at a perfectly average cost. He has a contract that fits his abilities, and the only problem with that contract is that it extends over the next four seasons. $28.1 million? Not too bad in the current NBA climate. Yet with earth-shaking changes to the Collective Bargaining Agreement right around the corner, paying a guy like Ariza that much money may not be reasonable in a year’s time.

Finances aside, the Hornets need help. They need players like Ariza who can fill in the gaps, sure, but what they really need is a talent who can take over the second fiddle from David West without skipping a beat. West isn’t going anywhere in the foreseeable future, but this team, as it’s currently constructed, isn’t working. There’s clearly not enough depth (who on earth is going to back up Chris Paul next year?), but talent at the top remains a glaring concern. Paul is a top-five player, but West, Ariza, Emeka Okafor, and Marcus Thornton aren’t enough. That combination could conceivably get the Hornets to the playoff brink, but what then?

Here’s what I’m getting at: Though Ariza might be the most intriguing wing player the Hornets have had during the Paul era, little has changed. New Orleans still has contracts that could hurt in the long-term, little financial flexibility, and now they’ve lost Darren Collison. The starting five NOLA trots out on opening night may be more complete because of this move, but I fail to see how it’s evidence of some methodical, long-term plan.

The Hornets traded in their insurance policy for a fresh coat of paint, but Paul’s no fool. He knows what Ariza is and isn’t, what he represents and what he doesn’t. Demps is trying (and that’s something), but if Paul really is insistent on finding a new team to call his own, Dell will have to do much better.   

Somebody looks comfortable: Paul George drops 20 in first quarter

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Paul George‘s first experience starting as a power forward was going up against Anthony Davis — not just one of the best power forwards in the game, one of the handful of best players in the game period. That didn’t go well for George, and he wasn’t happy about it.

His second experience was in another preseason game Tuesday, going up against the Pistons and their four, Ersan İlyasova. He’s not quite as intimidating.

George scored 20 points on 7-of-8 shooting, 4-of-5 on threes — and that was just the first quarter (you can see it all in the video above).

As we have said before, George at the four is not a bad call by the Pacers, but some of that depends on the matchup. On the nights the Pacers face Davis or Blake Griffin or LaMarcus Aldridge or Zach Randolph (or a handful of others) the Pacers’ coaching staff is going to have to adjust. But there are a lot of nights where George at the four is going to force the other team to adjust, and that will play into the Pacers’ hands.

Is DeMarcus Cousins MVP worthy? “It’s mine to grab”

DeMarcus Cousins

Last season, DeMarcus Cousins received zero MVP votes (the same as every year of his career). Even though he averaged 24.1 points, and 12.7 rebounds a game, which was enough to get him his first All-Star berth, MVP is another thing entirely. Only players on winning teams tend to draw the attention of MVP voters.

This season, can Cousins — arguably the best center in the game — get in the conversation?

He thinks it’s more than just that, he told Kevin Ding at Bleacher Report.

The topic is the 2015-16 NBA MVP award and whether it could be reachable for DeMarcus Cousins.

“Reachable, man?” Cousins told Bleacher Report, his voice rising high. “It’s mine to grab.”

As noted above, the only way Cousins gets into the conversation — fair or not — is if the Kings are in the playoffs (at the very least). He understands that.

“It’s going to take a full team effort,” Cousins said. “I’ll try to play at a high level and bring my team along with me.”

Vlade Divac built a Kings’ team designed to start winning now — as you would expect from a team a year away from moving into a new arena they need to fill. Owner Vivek Ranadive is not about selling hope anymore, he wants to sell wins.

I think Cousins can help provide that.

I’m less sold on the cast around him being able to help.