Rajon Rondo's jump shot remains a work in progress

Leave a comment

rondo_team_ussa.jpg

Ah, August. It’s that magical time of the year when kids get back from camp and start to get ready to go back to school, the baseball pennant races begin to heat up, and there’s at least one article about the improvements Rajon Rondo has made to his jump shot. 
Rondo has emerged as one of the best all-around point guards in basketball, but his jumper remains a glaring weakness — Rondo essentially doesn’t have to be guarded beyond 15 feet, and shoots free throws like a center. 
Some of Rondo’s shooting woes stem from physiology — the same long arms and massive hands that Rondo uses to make his drives so effective have proved detrimental to his efforts to establish a reliable jumper. Some of Rondo’s problems are due to his deeply, deeply flawed shooting stroke, which does seem to get just a bit less ugly every year. Or maybe Rondo has just spent his time figuring out more ways to get to the basket and make quality passes rather than trying to develop a consistent perimeter game.
Whatever the reasons behind Rondo’s iffy jumper are, Doc Rivers would like to see Rondo make some improvements on his jumper during the off-season, especially after seeing Kobe Bryant sag off of Rondo with impunity and clog the paint during the 2010 NBA Finals. The Boston Herald’s Dan Duggan has the report:
“That hurts you in the playoffs when the best player on the other team is allowed to rest and clog up the middle,” Rivers said. “That’s what made their defense so strong, that their best roamer was Kobe. We have to correct that problem. That hurt us.”
Rivers is only looking for modest improvements from Rondo.
“We want him to shoot the right shots,” Rivers said. “The 3-point shot, I could care less. I could care less if he takes another 3 the rest of his career as far as I’m concerned. But we have to get him to make the elbow jump shot.”

Rivers would also like to see Rondo become a better free throw shooter, as he believes that Rondo stopped driving in the finals because he had no confidence in his ability to knock down free throws if he was fouled. Ultimately, Rivers knows that his team’s young star is putting in work on his jumper, but is trying to be realistic about what effects that work will have: 

Rondo will again work with shooting specialist Mark Price and Rivers is hoping for further development.
“Rondo puts in hours on it,” Rivers said. “That’s all he can do. But he’s going to correct it. It’s not going to be overnight. He’s going to be a little better next year and he’ll be a little better each year. I’ve never seen a guy go from bad to great. That just doesn’t happen.”

Top 10 NBA plays of last season by position (video)

Leave a comment

Which position – point guard, shooting guard, small forward, power forward or center – produced the best highlights last season?

Watch this video to find out and be glad the positional revolution didn’t reduce it fewer highlights.

Ohio farm commemorates Cavaliers championship with corn mazes (photo)

OAKLAND, CA - JUNE 19:  LeBron James #23, Kevin Love #0, and J.R. Smith #5 of the Cleveland Cavaliers celebrate after defeating the Golden State Warriors 93-89 in Game 7 of the 2016 NBA Finals at ORACLE Arena on June 19, 2016 in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Could you find your way out of LeBron James‘ head?

Now, you can find out.

An Ohio farm has created three corn mazes – one featuring LeBron’s head, one that says Believeland and one with a Larry O’Brien Trophy – to commemorate the Cavaliers 2016 NBA title:

This is a championship-level corn maze. 🏆🌽 Thanks for the love, @maplesidefarms! #OneForTheLand #Believeland

A photo posted by Cleveland Cavaliers (@cavs) on

College coaches vote UConn’s Kevin Ollie best-suited/most likely to make NBA jump

DES MOINES, IA - MARCH 17:  head coach Kevin Ollie of the Connecticut Huskies reacts on the sideline in the first half against the Colorado Buffaloes during the first round of the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Wells Fargo Arena on March 17, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Kevin Ollie made himself one of the NBA’s hottest coaching prospects by leading UConn to the 2014 NCAA title.

He has since resisted NBA overtures, including from the Lakers in 2014 and Thunder last year.

But his peers don’t expect Ollie’s hesitance to last.

Gary Parrish and Matt Norlander of CBSSPorts.com asked more than 110 college coaches, “Which active college coach is best suited and most likely to next jump to the NBA?” The results:

Coach, college Percentage

Kevin Ollie, UConn 20 percent

Bill Self, Kansas 17 percent

John Calipari, Kentucky 16 percent

Jay Wright, Villanova 16 percent

Shaka Smart, Texas 9 percent

Tony Bennett, Virginia 8 percent

Note: Other coaches who received at least three or more votes: Sean Miller (Arizona), Larry Krystkowiak (Utah) and Avery Johnson (Alabama).

Keep in mind 80% of responds didn’t answer Ollie. But he’s still makes sense atop the leaderboard.

Ollie isn’t the typical college-to-NBA coach, and Brad Stevens and Billy Donovan – and maybe eventually Fred Hoiberg – are changing that perception, anyway. Not is Ollie showing his basketball acumen at Connecticut, his 13-year NBA career suggests he can translate his style to the next level.

Of course, Calipari always comes up on these lists. He coaches more future NBA stars than anyone, and he loves the attention that comes with the perception NBA teams are chasing him. But he has the best job in college basketball at Kentucky, so luring him will be difficult.

Self and Wright, the other coaches who got at least 10% of the vote, come up from time to time in NBA rumors. But it never seems to be anything that goes anywhere.

Hornets’ Frank Kaminsky: I was ‘overwhelmed’ at times defensively last year

LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 31: Brandon Bass #2 of the Los Angeles Lakers blocks a layup by Frank Kaminsky #44 of the Charlotte Hornets during the second half of the basketball game at Staples Center January 31, 2016, in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using the photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Frank Kaminsky ranked 119th of 165 big men in ESPN’s real plus-minus last season.

The eye test matched.

Kaminsky isn’t strong enough to defend inside, and he’s not mobile enough to defend the perimeter.

The assessment might sound harsh, but coming off his rookie season, Kaminsky put it just as bluntly.

Kaminsky, via Rick Bonnell of The Charlotte Observer:

“I’ve got to be a better overall defender. I was overwhelmed at times,” Kaminsky said. “My preparation, obviously, needs to get better. I so want to be a more consistent player. I’d have a good game and then disappear in the next.”

Kaminsky competes defensively, and Hornets coach Steve Clifford can work with that. Despite his shortcomings, Charlotte still allowed fewer points per possession with Kaminsky on the floor than off. That had plenty to do with whom Kaminsky shared the floor, but it’s evidence his defense is already at least tolerable.

As Kaminsky acclimates to the NBA, his defense could improve. He’ll never be a great leaper, and his length is pedestrian for his position. But he moves alright and plays hard. Add better defensive recognition, and he could be fine.