Blue chipper Will Barton may not be eligible to go to Memphis, but Europe, D-League beckon

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Latavious Williams isn’t the best player to ever waltz through the D-League, but could be among the most influential. After being declared academically ineligible to play for Memphis prior to last season, Williams opted to still pursue a domestic route to the NBA. Rather than follow the Brandon Jennings model and grab a quick paycheck before making his NBA debut, Williams blazed a trail of his own, and declared for the D-League draft with absolutely no college or professional experience.

Now, Memphis recruit Will Barton is running into similar eligibility issues. He has a much higher profile than Williams ever did as a prospect (Barton was ranked the 11th best recruit in his class by Rivals, and the 2nd best shooting guard prospect), but the doors to the our nation’s most prestigious academic institution will remain closed to him. Bummer.

But they say that every time the basketball gods close the door to Memphis, they open a window into the officiall NBA minor league affiliate. Barton has a chance to follow either Williams or Jennings, should the concerns over his eligibility not be cleared up, and a path through the D would likely be best for both Barton and, more obviously, the league.

The problem, as Scott Schroeder noted at Ridiculous Upside, isn’t that a trip through Europe would necessarily harm Barton’s NBA stock or even his development. If he chose to go overseas rather than play in the D-League, it’s very unlikely that his career would be suffer any kind of significant negative impact. Yet as the competition in the D continues to get better and better, Barton would get a head start working with NBA-style coaches and talent evaluators.

Barton could impress league scouts without having to worry about a language barrier, culture shock, or getting a consistent paycheck. There are definitely European leagues out there better than the D-League in terms of competition and talent, but if Barton wants a place where he can really showcase his skills (Jennings was hardly allowed such a luxury) while working to get better under the watchful eyes of NBA decision-makers, the D is an obvious choice.

Whether Barton goes to Memphis, the D-League, or overseas, he looks like a potential lottery pick in 2011 or beyond. Yet if you’ll allow me to dip into my bag of cliché, the journey matters here far more than the destination. Barton’s pre-NBA career could hold a significant impact on the paths lottery level talents take to the big leagues, and if he manages to improve the reputation and the audience of the D-League in the process, NBA teams across the board stand to benefit.

Spurs to give Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili Friday night off in Denver

Manu Ginobili, Harrison Barnes, Tim Duncan
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The Spurs are 12-3 and comfortably in second place in the West, they have the best defense in the NBA allowing just 93.8 points per 100 possessions, and they have a top-10 offense to go with it.

So, time to start making sure guys are rested.

That is the first night of a back-to-back, with former Spurs’ assistant coach Mike Budenholzer and his Atlanta Hawks coming to San Antonio on Saturday. Popovich is saving his two veterans for that game.

Duncan and Ginobili have looked like they found the fountain of youth this season. Duncan is taking on less of the offense but has been very efficient in those moments. Ginobili has the impact he did a few years back in his bench role.

What Gregg Popovich cares about is them playing like that come the postseason. So they will rest on Friday.

Brandon Armstrong impersonates Ray Allen (video)

2014 NBA Finals - Game Five
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Ray Allen is retired-ish, but he’ll always be running through screens – in our mind and in this video.

Celtics draft pick Marcus Thornton gets beer dumped on head during Australian game (video)

Marcus Thornton, Will Cherry

The Celtics drafted Marcus Thornton with No. 45 pick in the 2015 NBA draft. That essentially entitled him to the required tender – a one-year contract offer, surely unguaranteed at the minimum.

Thornton rejected that, which is almost always a mistake.

Rejecting the tender is a favor to the drafting team, which gets to keep the player’s exclusive rights for a year. If Thornton tries to join the NBA now, he’s stuck negotiating with only the Celtics.

By accepting the tender, the player typically gets one of two outcomes. He either plays on that contract and draws an NBA salary or he gets waived. But even getting waived is better than rejecting the tender, because at least the player becomes a free agent and can negotiate with any team.

Players who reject the tender go to another league and play for less money. In Thornton’s case, that mean Australia.

How’s that going?

(Almost) never reject the required tender as a second-round pick.

Byron Scott says they just have to get Kobe Bryant better looks

Kobe Bryant, Joe Johnson, Byron Scott

Kobe Bryant is averaging 15.2 points a game at age 37. It’s just taking him 16.4 shots per game to get there. After his 1-of-14 shooting performance against the Warriors the other night — with too much isolation and too many plays run just for him — there has been a lot of talk about his shot. With reason, this is his shot chart so far this season.

Kobe shotchart season

So what do the Lakers’ do? Get Kobe to shoot less and get the ball in the hands of the young stars they supposed to be developing more? Nah.

They just need to get Kobe better looks, Scott told the Los Angeles Times.

“I know his mentality is that he can still play in this league,” Scott said. “And we feel the same way….

“Obviously he’s struggling right now with his shot, and I think everybody can see that,” Scott said. “So it’s trying to get him in better position to be able to have an opportunity to knock those shots down on a consistent basis. That’s No. 1.

“I don’t know if it’s his legs. I don’t think so. Again, our conversations are pretty blunt. … He tells me when he is tired and he tells me when he’s not tired. And the last few days, he said he feels great. So, I don’t think it’s a matter of him being tired or his legs being tired. I think it’s a matter of his timing being a little off.”

Yes, how could it be his legs? It’s not like he’s a 37-year-old with more than 55,000 NBA minutes played, and coming off an Achilles rupture and major knee surgery.

Honestly, I hope the Lakers and Kobe find a balance soon, because they have become just hard to watch. And I don’t want Kobe to go out this way.