Jazz owner's debate on adding Al Jefferson highlights revenue sharing issue

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Jazz_logo.gifWe at PBT, along with most of the basketball world, have applauded what the Jazz did this offseason. They lost Carlos Boozer, but in Al Jefferson found a good replacement. They added Raja Bell. Next season, the Jazz may be a slightly better team than they were last year.

But it was not an easy decision, as owner Greg Miller told the Salt Lake Tribune.

Once they had discussed the favorable basketball implications of adding a low-post force in Jefferson, who averaged 20.1 points and 10.4 rebounds the past three seasons with the Timberwolves, (CFO Bob) Hyde went over the financial particulars with Miller.

Specifically, Hyde presented a worst-case scenario, according to Miller, of what would happen if the Jazz missed the playoffs given the payroll commitments they would have after acquiring Jefferson and positioning themselves as a luxury-tax paying team.

“Based on the economics, I felt like the risk was acceptable and decided to pull the trigger,” Miller said in an interview last week, adding, “It was a big decision, but I felt like … I had enough good information to make a good decision, and only time will tell.”

Applaud Miller for taking that risk, for keeping a good team in Utah.

But he will be at least $5 million over the tax threshold when the season starts (the tax threshold will be $70 million, the Jazz are at $73 million with some minor contracts to add to fill out the roster). Which means that he will pay about $5 million in the dollar-for-dollar tax. He also will not get the $3.5 to $4 million in payment that goes to teams under the tax.

That is a $9 million swing, which for a team in a small market like Salt Lake can be the difference between profit and loss. Utah needs those playoff games, when the teams don’t pay salary but they get more nights of revenue.

What it underscores is the disparity in revenue and how revenue sharing will be key. The Lakers payroll will likely be in the $93 million range. Spending money alone does not win titles (or the last decade would have been the Knicks and Mavericks decade) but Los Angeles can afford more good role-playing talent to go around its stars. It can afford more stars. It can afford more mistakes. The Lakers have back-to-back titles because they have not made a lot of mistakes, but the margin for error is there, as it is with the Yankees in baseball.

And how to bring competitive balance, so that a small step over the luxury tax is not so onerous on small markets, has to be part of the next CBA talks. David Stern wants revenue sharing and the union agreement to be dealt with separately, but they are tied together in the health of the sport.

The Warriors really had an eye on Joel Embiid’s trash talking (VIDEO)

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Joel Embiid has a reputation around the league already, and for good reason.

The man who continuously lobbied Rihanna to give him a chance for a date has other NBA players hoping they beat the Philadelphia 76ers just to avoid Embiid’s trash talking.

Indeed, the Golden State Warriors beat Philly on Saturday night, 124-116, thanks in part to a huge rally in the second half. A 22-point deficit had to be overcome for Golden State, and not just to add to their win column.

The team also wanted to sidestep Embiid’s silver tongue:

Both Draymond Green and Kevin Durant said they wanted to keep Embiid at bay. Durant’s comment was particularly funny, and can be seen in the video at the top of the article (fair warning, Durant used some NSFW language).

The Process is now The Reputation.

Former Knicks, Warriors F David Lee announces retirement from NBA

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One of the NBA’s more under appreciated forwards has announced his retirement from the NBA.

David Lee, who spent time in his career with the New York Knicks, Golden State Warriors, Boston Celtics, Dallas Mavericks, and San Antonio Spurs, told the NBA world about his retirement via his Instagram page on Sunday.

Lee, 34, played last season with the Spurs. He averaged 7.3 points, 5.6 rebounds, and 1.6 assists for Gregg Popovich’s team.

Via Instagram:

Lee played 14 seasons in the NBA, the majority of which came with the Knicks. During his time in New York, Lee was seen as an unsung hero, nabbing rebounds and doing yeoman’s work from the power forward position.

The Knicks traded Lee to Golden State in the summer of 2010 for Kelenna Azubuike, Anthony Randolph, Ronny Turiaf, and two second round picks. He was part of the Warriors’ 2014-15 NBA Championship before eventually being traded to Boston in 2015.

Sixers say injured Markelle Fultz will be re-evaluated in 2-3 weeks

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We were all waiting for supposed “good news” about injured Philadelpia 76ers guard and No. 1 overall pick Markelle Fultz. And it looks like we’ve got it? It’s hard to tell with this one.

On Sunday, the Sixers announced that Fultz — suffering from a sore right shoulder — would be re-evaluated in two to three weeks.

That’s at least some kind of timeline, which is more than we got when Fultz was originally ruled out indefinitely at the end of October.

Here’s the announcement from the Sixers.

Via Twitter:

Fultz has reportedly been working out and shooting left handed, which one can only hope is adding to his dexterity.

No doubt Sixers fans just want to see him on the court again as quickly as possible. The saga of the imbalanced shoulder has been a strange one, we’ve all got our fingers crossed that it settles normally.

Damian Lillard defends Blazers’ coach Terry Stotts on Instagram

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It’s far too early for panic in Portland. This is a team most outside Portland thought would finish a little above .500 and maybe grab one of the back-end playoff spots in the West, and at 9-7 they are on that pace.

But after an ugly Portland loss to Sacramento (just a few games after a loss to Brooklyn where coach Terry Stotts benched center Jusuf Nurkick for most of the fourth), Trail Blazers fans were restless and started to slam coach Stotts on the Trail Blazers’ Instagram page.

I doubt Stotts noticed, but Damian Lillard did and jumped in to defend his coach.

Lillard added this (hat tip Mike Richman at the Oregonian).

“Because people think they know more about what it takes to get things done at this level … For our team than they actually do,” he said. “We’re in this position for a reason. And coach Stotts had two 50-win seasons here and four straight years in the playoffs for a reason –because he knows what he’s doing. They mention … our record is 8-7 and we’re having breakdowns late in games. Well those breakdowns are a missed shot here, a turnover there, a defensive breakdown here, giving up extra possessions, missed free throws. It’s things that players control. If we were down 30 every game, that’s different. But we’re in position to win games. And when it’s time to win games, that’s the players’ job. “

Lillard is loyal to those around him and has had the back of teammates and his coach before.

Lillard and his teammates went out Saturday night and got some revenge on the Kings, winning 102-90.

Portland’s defense has been surprisingly good this season, second best in the NBA. It should have been better with Nurkic in the paint, but this has been a radical turnaround for a team where that end of the floor held them back in recent years. While that lofty ranking may not stick all season, the Blazers are defending.

Now the Blazers are just having trouble scoring efficiently (18th in the NBA), which is a little about a less-efficient Lillard and a rough start on that end for Nurkic.  That end of the court should come around, Lillard and C.J. McCollum are too good for it not to.