Ron Artest is far more self-aware than you gave him credit for

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rartest_postgame.jpgRon Artest may or may not be crazy, you can make the call on that. But the man is not simple.

As fans we tend to think of professional athletes as two dimensional, and we tend to care far more about what they do at their job than we do about them as people. We like to fit them into neat, stereotypical boxes and leave them there, even if that is not the truth.

We are drawn to the players and people who don’t fit in those boxes. In truth, not a lot of players do, but most keep the other parts of their lives — family, relationships, problems — out of the spotlight, so we just see the parts that fit our preconceived notions.

Some players blow that box up. Artest is one of those, and as such he’s been labeled as crazy. But it would be a better world if more people were as self-aware as he is.

That’s what comes across in a fascinating Q&A in the latest ESPN the Magazine. Which starts with his answer to the question “are you crazy?”

What’s crazy? You need to decide. On Twitter you could say I’m pretty crazy, or you could say I just have a weird sense of humor. Off the court you could say I’m pretty crazy, or you could say I’m just ghetto. On the court you could say I’m pretty crazy, or you could say I just play really hard. To each person, I could be a different person. So you need to decide. Of course, there have been times when I’ve done crazy things. But I don’t think I’m crazy. I just grew up in a crazy world.

Artest is frank about the problems in his past, including the impact of his parents divorce.

Alcohol was part of the problem. At 15 I started to get twisted, and at 16 I was getting lit up on a regular basis. By the time the Bulls drafted me, I’d drink in the house all day, then go play a game. But I stopped drinking heavily in Sacramento. I’m sure I wouldn’t have made the same mistakes if I hadn’t been drinking. Was I crazy, or was I not sober enough to have a clear mind? That’s the question.

He also talks about sobering up and what he has learned from counseling.

Every time we talked about my problems — at home, in my life, whatever — it would always come back to basketball. She helped me realize that. So we mostly talked about basketball. We talked about my moves, my shot, and how all of the pressure I felt about my game was interfering with the rest of my life. Like, I found out that an argument with my wife was because I had a bad game, and I had a bad game because Coach Jackson was getting on my nerves. I’d bring that stress back home. It was a cycle. Dr. Santhi (Periasamy) said, “Solve the basketball problems, and you’ll solve the rest.” Now, I can take the pressure, the anxiety, the heat from the media and fans, and it doesn’t faze me. I don’t rush anymore. I’m not anxious for a game, or to get my shot. Everything will come to me. Dr. Santhi helped me figure that out.

Phil Jackson still gets under his skin. He loves Indiana. He makes up his own motivational quotes. Really should go read the Q&A, because Artest doesn’t fit neatly into this post, either.

Larry Nance Jr. throws alley-oop to himself, throws alley-oop to himself (video)

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Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. immediately motioned for the replay to be shown of this dunk. It was necessary to properly appreciate it.

Best dunk of the night.

Donovan Mitchell won the dunk contest, though.

Larry Nance Jr. plays tribute to father — rock-the-cradle dunk in Suns uniform

Associated Press
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Back in 1984, high-flying Larry Nance Sr. won the first NBA All-Star Dunk Contest with this set of dunks — most famously a rock-the-cradle move.

Larry Nance Jr. came into the 2018 Dunk Contest and went nostalgic — all the way back to the Suns’ throwback uniform and the same dunk.

That and a good second dunk got him into the Dunk Contest finals. In that round, Nance Sr. threw an alley-oop to his son for the windmill.

Donovan Mitchell throws alley-oop to himself – off second backboard (video)

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LOS ANGELES – Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell set a high standard with the first slam of the 2018 dunk contest.

Very creative. Very well-executed.

Looks like all that preparation paid off.

Devin Booker’s 3-point-contest victory bright spot for Suns (video)

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Los Angeles – Devin Booker‘s Suns have the NBA’s worst record (18-41).

“I think everyone is fed up with the losing, from the top to the bottom of the organization,” Booker said this afternoon. “So, for us, it’s what’s next?”

A 3-point contest victory.

Overcoming Phoenix’s poor record to draw an invite to All-Star Saturday Night, Booker won the 3-point contest with a whopping 29 points in the final round.

That score left little margin for 2016 champion Klay Thompson, who capped the event with a 25-point round that was otherwise the night’s high. Clippers forward Tobias Harris, in his new home arena, finished third.

Booker was all smiles after the rare victory.

“Season not going how we planned, but I know a lot of the city was ready for this All-Star Weekend, having somebody participate,” Booker said. “So, I’m glad I could win it.

Where he and the Suns go from here is still questionable, but he has a plan.

“I’m going to win the dunk contest next year,” Booker said. “No, I’m just kidding.”

Full results

First round

Klay Thompson 19

Devin Booker 19

Tobias Harris 18

Wayne Ellington 17

Bradley Beal 15

Eric Gordon 12

Kyle Lowry 11

Paul George 9

Second round

Devin Booker 29

Klay Thompson 25

Tobias Harris 17