Raptors' preference for a Chris Bosh sign-and-trade likely means more suitors than ever and a better chance for a Miami supergroup

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Thumbnail image for bosh_wade.jpgWhy should the teams with cap space get to have all the fun? Even if the Cavs don’t want any part of a sign-and-trade for LeBron and Dwyane Wade seems locked into Miami, the Raptors not only appear open to the idea of signing-and-trading Chris Bosh, but Bryan Colangelo actually prefers it. From Marc J. Spears of Yahoo Sports:

The Toronto Raptors have begun to assess which players they would try to obtain in potential sign-and-trade transactions involving free-agent forward Chris Bosh. Raptors general manager Bryan Colangelo told a Toronto radio station he thinks Bosh “likely” will leave the team. Should Bosh decide to sign elsewhere, Colangelo also said the Raptors will try to engage in a sign-and-trade deal to bring the franchise some measure of compensation.

Sources said the Raptors will try to acquire draft picks and young players in return for Bosh. They would likely ask for forward Michael Beasley and point guard Mario Chalmers in any deal with the Miami Heat. If Bosh were to go to the Chicago Bulls, the Raptors like forward Taj Gibson and center Joakim Noah, though Noah could prove impossible to pry from Chicago. If Bosh settles on the New York Knicks, the Raptors would try to engage in a double sign-and-trade that sends Knicks forward David Lee to Toronto. Sources called a potential sign-and-trade with the Los Angeles Lakers “doubtful.”

That’s great and all, but if the Raptors really are exploring sign-and-trade possibilities, that opens up a whole new group of suitors for Chris Bosh’s services. So far, we know two things about Bosh: he wants to play his natural position (power forward) and wants to be “the man.” Whatever that means. So in addition to Bosh’s assumed free agent suitors, we could also add a number of other teams to the mix.

The Denver Nuggets, for example, may be able to put together an interesting package featuring Ty Lawson, Kenyon Martin’s expiring contract, and draft picks. The Houston Rockets could combine expiring contracts with intermediate value (like Shane Battier) with young, proven assets (like Aaron Brooks) and even a signed-and-trade Luis Scola, who I’m sure appeals to Colangelo’s Euro sensibilities.

The Oklahoma City Thunder could even make a play (perhaps involving Jeff Green, Eric Maynor, Serge Ibaka, or any number of intriguing players) if Bosh is willing to play nice with Kevin Durant. Such move would negate the Thunder’s one real weakness, and the idea of a Westbrook-Sefolosha-Durant-Bosh-Aldrich starting lineup is absolutely fantastic.

All of those options are conjecture, but Colangelo opening the door for a sign-and-trade not only allows Chris Bosh to immediately join a competitive team, but could actually net the Raptors something in return. Colangelo obviously won’t get anything near equal value, but the assets Toronto could potentially acquire may help to jump-start a rebuild.

Of course, the giant, league-changing elephant in the room is the Miami Project, Pat Riley’s no-going-back plan for basketball proliferation. If Bosh were signed-and-traded to the Heat (which Dan LeBatard “reports” — and I use that term loosely given the source — is a done deal, even if it’s only agreed to in principle), it would have to include both Beasley and Chalmers going to Toronto, as Spears noted above. Miami still wouldn’t have enough cap room to sign both Dwyane Wade and LeBron James to max deals outright, but we’re at least looking at a cap figure that would allow something in the ballpark of two max contracts.

Someone would have to take a pay cut, but a sign-and-trade move for Bosh would position the hands on the Doomsday Clock a few minutes closer to midnight. Still, Bosh doesn’t see it happening, and Michael Grange of the Toronto Globe and Mail cites a source that refutes the immediate Bosh-to-Miami rumors. That doesn’t mean it won’t happen, but we can at least wait a little while longer before we crawl under our desks to wait for the fallout.   

Did Lakers help keep LeBron James in Cleveland with trade?

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When the trade went down between the Lakers and Cavaliers before the deadline — sending Jordan Clarkson and Larry Nance Jr. to Cleveland in exchange for Isaiah Thomas and Channing Frye plus Cleveland’s 2018 first-round draft pick (top-five protected) — it caught the NBA by surprise.

The first reaction for a lot of people to the deal? This opens up as much as $70 million in cap space for the Lakers this summer (depending on other moves with players such as Julius Randle). Los Angeles could sign two max players — LeBron James and Paul George. Why would Cleveland help Los Angeles open up room to steal LeBron.

The Cavaliers didn’t see it that way — they knew they had to make a major shakeup or LeBron was gone. At that point, does it matter where? So in a series of moves, Cleveland GM Koby Altman radically remade the roster around LeBron. The goal was to energize them back into being the team to beat in the East, and from there make it hard for him to leave as a free agent. Since the trades, the Cavaliers are 2-0 and LeBron has clearly been reinvigorated, plus they will add Kevin Love back in a few weeks.

Altman’s plan seems to be working, one executive told Mark Spears of ESPN’s The Undefeated.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if he stays in Cleveland now,” one high-ranking Eastern Conference team executive said. “The Cavaliers put a really good team around him. The Cavaliers have made it really tough for him to decide to leave Cleveland again. The Lakers might have helped them keep LeBron.”

I had heard from sources for a while LeBron to the Lakers was not likely (Paul George is another story, that door remains open). As Spears notes, the Lakers did not have an All-Star in Sunday’s game. Even if LeBron and PG13 went to Los Angeles, that team was third or fourth best in the West next season. LeBron is in full on legacy mode and wants to win rings. Los Angeles is not the place to do it.

Houston is interesting (and it’s still a team I hear some execs think has a real shot), but the gutting or role players on that roster to make it work would be a concern. Maybe a dark horse such as Philadelphia can emerge. However, if LeBron can lead this newly-energized Cavaliers team to the Finals again (his eighth consecutive trip there), they get a high draft pick with the Brooklyn pick, then LeBron gets a commitment from Altman and owner Dan Gilbert to keep spending and being aggressive, where is he going to be closer to a title than at home?

Lou Williams trolls Jimmy Butler for resting during All-Star Game

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Jimmy Butler was in Los Angeles and enjoying his well-earned All-Star slot on Team Stephen.

Well, except for the actual playing basketball part. Butler did not set foot on the court during the All-Star Game at his own request.

“Rest,” Butler said when asked why he didn’t play. “I have to rest. I have to rest my body up. This Timberwolves season is very, very important to me. I’ve got to make sure I’m ready to roll when I get back there.”

Lou Williams, the Clippers’ guard who likely would have been near the front of the line for an open All-Star roster spot in the West (likely second in the queue behind Chris Paul), but instead took part in the Saturday Skills Competition then had Sunday off, trolled Butler for it on Twitter.

This seems more good natured than genuinely bitter.

Williams will roll with it, but his point’s a valid one — if you’re an All-Star, at least play a little and give the people what they want. Get out there for five minutes or whatever. LaMarcus Aldridge only played four minutes, no big deal.

If you’re not going to use the roster spot, give it up to someone who will.

Report: Raptors won’t sign Vince Carter if he gets bought out

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Of returning to the Raptors, Vince Carter said, “It’ll happen one day.” It sounds as if the Kings would buy him out if he wants.

Will he end the season with Toronto?

Josh Lewenberg of TSN 1050:

After speaking with a few team sources, I can confirm that they’ve had internal dialogue and debate about the idea of bringing Vince Carter back. It’s something that they wanted to do over the summer. That’s why they made him an offer, something that I’ve reported in the past. And it’s also something that they’d be open to in the future, perhaps next year in some capacity. But they’ve decided now is not the right time. And I think the consensus seems to be there’s so much going on right now, and they want this season to be about this team, their accomplishments and their playoff push and not the sideshow that I think would come with a Vince Carter return.

The Raptors (41-16) are on pace for their best record ever. They’re excelling offensively and defensively. Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan are spearheading a more dynamic offense that spurs hope for more playoff success.

Toronto is probably correct to save the Carter reunion for another year – though it depends who else is available. That 15th roster spot could be useful. If Carter is the best player who’d sign, the Raptors should sign him and deal with the hoopla.

But it’s not clear whom they could get or whether they could even get Carter. He hasn’t sounded like someone who’d forgo guaranteed salary to play for the minimum.

Tiago Splitter announces retirement

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Tiago Splitter was so effective in his role for the Spurs during their playoff run to the 2014 title – 19.1 PER, .239 win shares per 48 minutes, +7.5 box plus-minus. It gets forgotten, because he twice lost his starting job that postseason.

Limited by a late start in the NBA and injuries, Splitter’s prime was short and ill-timed. He was a traditional center just as those were going out of style.

But for moments in the right matchups, he provided a major boost to a championship team. That was the peak of a seven-year NBA career.

HoopsHype:

Tiago Splitter announced his retirement at the age of 33 in an interview with SporTV.

Splitter just couldn’t get healthy. He missed 150 games over the last three years with the Spurs, Hawks and 76ers.

Drafted No. 28 in 2007, Splitter remained overseas for a few years and built hype and intrigue. He signed with San Antonio and started alongside Tim Duncan for a couple years. The Spurs later dumped him on Atlanta to clear space for LaMarcus Aldridge – a sign of Splitter’s success. He earned about $47 million in his NBA career.