NBA finals, Lakers Celtics Game 2: How Ray Allen got his groove back (and the Celtics, too)

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Allen_pure.jpgIn June 1992, Ray Allen was doing what every other basketball crazed 16-year-old in the nation was doing — watching Michael Jordan rain threes on the Portland Trail Blazers. Six of them in Game 1 of the finals. Leading the Bulls to a crushing of the Trail Blazers.

Tonight, Ray Allen was better than that. He was better than anyone has been from deep in the finals.

Others had bested MJ for a night, too. Scottie Pippen hit seven threes in the finals once, so did Kenny Smith. But those guys were both secondary scorers on a team — they were the outlet when the main man was covered. They were not the guy expected to carry the load. They were not 34 years old at the time.

Allen is those things, and he carried the load like Hercules. He was better than Pippen and Smith.

Allen started 7 for 7 from three and finished 8 for 11 from beyond the arc. More threes than any other player has ever made in a finals game. He carried Boston though the first half with 27 points, and the Celtics went on to win 103-94 to even the series.

“Mike, I’m going to tell him his were a lot easier,” Allen joked.

Three nights before Allen wasn’t joking around. He was frustrated; he had been sitting with fouls. It made him a little tentative. He became a facilitator, not a shooter, and the Lakers won comfortably.

Sunday night Allen was running off the multiple screens he always get and there just seemed to be more room. His first couple threes were good looks, and he got in a rhythm. And when one of the greatest jumper shooters ever to lace up a pair of high tops gets going, there is nothing anyone can do. He had 27 first half points and almost single-handedly kept his team in it.

“Well, it makes me a better coach, I can tell you that,” Doc Rivers said of Allen’s jumper. “And when you draw up these plays and he makes them, you feel a lot smarter.”

The only way to stop Ray Allen when he gets like this is to get the ball out of his hands, but the Lakers are poorly matched up to do that. Because Los Angeles puts the longer Kobe Bryant on Rajon Rondo, Derek Fisher has to chase Allen around all those picks. Fisher is not that fast and Allen has a few inches and can shoot over him easily. Fisher’s strength is to be able to bump people off their line, but Allen got to any spot he wanted on the floor.

“Well, you know, when (the referees) take away any bumps, when Fish is trying to make (Allen) divert his path and they don’t allow him to do that, they call fouls on Fish and that really gives him the opportunity to take whatever route he wants to make off the pickers,” Phil Jackson said, longing for the days of the legal hand check. “That makes it very difficult.”

In the second half the Lakers adjusted, switching a big off onto Allen as he came off a strong-side pick, forcing Allen to shoot over the long arm of Andrew Bynum or Pau Gasol. It worked, Allen was just 1 of 3 and had an airball from deep in the second half.

But it opened up other things for Boston, because on the switch Fisher had to guard Big Baby or Kendrick Perkins in the post. Then there was Rondo, who was taking the game over on his own in the second half.

But by then the Celtics were in a groove they never got in during all of Game 1. You can thank Ray Allen and one of the best shooting games ever in the finals for that.

Kobe Bryant with spin move around LeBron James (VIDEO)

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The game itself went about how you’d expect one between a title contender and a high lottery team to go — the Cavaliers 120-111 win over the Lakers was never really in doubt.

But the fans in Cleveland wanted to see some vintage Kobe Bryant, and they got it late when he spun around LeBron James and hit the reverse lay-up.

LeBron had 29 points on the night, and Kyrie Irving had 35. Kobe finished with 17 and got a standing ovation from the Cleveland crowd.

Suns’ Markieff Morris, Archie Goodwin get in scuffle on the bench

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Just another magical day in the Valley of the Sun, where clearly Jeff Hornacek was the problem….

During an early timeout in the Suns’ game at Golden State, Markieff Morris tried to explain something to Archie Goodwin, who is seated. This conversation gets heated quickly, and teammates eventually have to step in and separate the two teammates.

The Suns have shopped Morris around as the trade deadline approaches, this isn’t going to help his value.

We should find out more about what happened after the game ends, although I’m sure both sides will play it down as “nothing.”

Kawhi Leonard drains game winner to beat Orlando (VIDEO)

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This is how much Gregg Popovich trusts Kawhi Leonard on offense now: Tie game with 13.3 seconds remaining, and the play design is a 1-4 flat isolation for Leonard. It’s the kind of play teams will call for LeBron James or Kevin Durant. Popovich just called it for Leonard.

And he was rewarded with a game-winning bucket.

Leonard finished with 29 points, LaMarcus Aldridge had 21, and the Spurs head into the All-Star break with a 45-8 record, on pace to win 70 games this season. And that still would only get them a two seed.

Hornets’ Michael Kidd-Gilchrist suffers shoulder dislocation, leaves game

Michael Kidd-Gilchrist
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Michael Kidd-Gilchrist had been back just six games after suffering a torn labrum in the preseason that required surgery. The Hornets had won four of those six, were playing improved defense, and looked like a potential playoff team in the East.

Now this.

He went straight to the locker room and did not return to the game (the Pacers got the win).

You can see the injury above. In a scramble for a loose ball, the Pacers’ Ian Mahinmi falls on MKG’s arm, dislocating his shoulder.

We don’t know the severity of all this and if MKG is going to miss time beyond this game. But it isn’t good.