Kobe "grateful" that he doesn't have to worry about free agency

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While LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki, and Chris Bosh are all trying to figure out where they’re going to be playing next year, Kobe Bryant is focusing on the task at hand: trying to get his fifth career NBA Championship ring. Kobe doesn’t have any decisions to make after the series, having signed a three-year extension with the Lakers this April. Kobe has what the rest of the league’s superstars are looking for: a great supporting cast, one of the best NBA coaches ever, one of the biggest markets in the world, and an adoring fanbase. 

When Kobe spoke to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports, he acknowledged that he’s “grateful” to have so much stability around him at this point in his career. He also talked about how determined he is to take advantage of the opportunity he has to win championship after championship:
While those young stars are scrambling for relevancy, Bryant has a chance to keep stacking title upon title. He’s on four, pushing for five.
“That’s exactly how I feel,” Bryant told Yahoo! Sports. “There are times when I sit back, particularly in the summer, and think about that. But when you’re in the heat of the moment, you’re thinking, “You’ve got a great opportunity here: ‘Don’t [bleep] this [bleep] up.’ “

Only a few years ago, Kobe didn’t have the luxury of being able to focus all of his energy on playing the game, something he acknowledges: 

“As the years went on, that list of what I had to worry about here has gotten shorter and shorter,” Bryant said. “In the first year [after Shaq], it was like, ‘Damn, I’ve got to score 40 points to keep us competitive. And I’ve got to make sure these guys stay in the gym late.’ It was a laundry list of stuff. The following year, it becomes, ‘What’s management doing?’
“Then every year, the list got shorter and shorter to where it is now. I don’t worry about what management is doing. I know they want to win.”

Kobe’s had some definite rough patches in his career. It wasn’t that long ago that Kobe’s team missed the playoffs, he had to try and win games playing alongside the likes of Smush Parker and Kwame Brown, he was openly criticizing the (non)-trades management was making, and Kobe himself ended up demanding a trade. All of that is behind Kobe now, and he’s in the kind of situation that James, Wade and all the other free agents are looking for. Nobody is more aware of that than Kobe is, and he’s going to do everything he can to make sure he makes the most of this opportunity. 

Video Breakdown: Cavaliers elevator doors fake out vs. Warriors in Game 4

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The 2017 NBA Finals are over but we just can’t quite move on to the summer without mentioning this play from the Cleveland Cavaliers’ Game 4 onslaught from 3-point range.

Yes, the Cavaliers hit a myriad of insane, falling over, lucky shots in their record-setting Game 4 win. But they also had a number of excellent plays drawn up by head coach Tyronn Lue, with one of them coming here in the first quarter.

The thing I love about this play the most is how it combines multiple actions to confuse one of the best defensive teams in the NBA in the Golden State Warriors. Cleveland mixed Floppy action with a sideline elevator doors play, getting both Klay Thompson and Draymond Green to overreact to Kyrie Irving.

Meanwhile, the real shooter ended up being one of the elevator doors screeners in Kevin Love.

Cleveland will need to regroup for next season if they hope to take on the Warriors yet again in the NBA finals in 2018. Meanwhile, check out this sweet video breakdown of a play that is straight out genius.

Watch Allen Iverson’s first bucket in Big3 League debut

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The Big3 League came to Brooklyn and put on a show (which you can see broadcast on FS 1 Monday night).

That includes coach Allen Iverson putting on a jersey and playing a little.

He got his first bucket taking a ball saved from going out of bounds, dribbling up to the elbow, and knocking it down. The crowd loved it. Iverson coached/played his team to victory thanks to Andre Owens putting up 20 points and 15 rebounds.

 

D’Angelo Russell makes first appearance at Barclays Center, gets booed

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Welcome to New York, D'Angelo Russell.

The Brooklyn Nets made a smart gamble before the draft and traded Brook Lopez (and his expiring contract) to the Lakers for the bloated contract of Timofey Mozgov and the promise of Russell. It’s a smart move to see if coach Kenny Atkinson can lift up the young point guard who shows promise but is inconsistent.

Nets fans don’t seem so thrilled. Russell showed up for the Big3 games at Barclays Center, and he did not feel the love, reports Tim Bontemps of the Washington Post.

These are New York fans, they would boo George Washington.

It’s simple for Russell, he just has to win them over. He gets a fresh start in Brooklyn and the baggage the Lakers saw him carrying is gone. It’s his chance to win a city over and be part of the future — but he will have to earn it.

Otherwise, it won’t be long or he will hear those boos again.

Spike Lee says not everyone at Nike thought Jordan should be face of company at first

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We have mythologized Michael Jordan into a man who could almost walk on water, and could certainly walk on air. He legitimately is the GOAT — or, at the very least, one of a handful of players ever worthy of being in that conversation — but the idea he is perfect is far from true.  (He was 6-7 in getting his team to the Finals, LeBron is 8-4, so LeBron lifted lesser teams farther, to use one devil’s advocate argument).

Not everyone always believed in Jordan, and that came out in a couple recent articles.

The Chicago Tribune ran a June 20, 1984, article about Jordan being drafted from their paper, where then GM Rod Thorn was not exactly selling Jordan as a franchise changing player.

“There just wasn’t a center available,” said Thorn. “What can you do?”

“He’s only 6-5,” said Thorn, who must use a different yardstick than Dean Smith, the Carolina coach. Down where the tobacco grows, Jordan has always been 6-6, not that one inch ever stopped Jordan from crashing the boards, hitting from the outside or playing substantially above sea level. By the time he gets to Chicago, or when negotiations for his wages get sticky, Jordan may be the size of a jockey. The Bulls aren’t even sure where to play Jordan. “Big guard, small forward,” said coach Kevin Loughery.

Jordan ended up being the perfect player at the perfect time — an all-time great who peaked just as the popularity of the game took off, and with a little help from Nike his image blew up.

Except, not everybody at Nike was down with Jordan being the face of the organization, Spike Lee told Sole Collector (remember Lee and his commercials helped blow up Jordan’s image).

“People don’t know about this, but the truth is a lot of people were speaking in Mr. Knight’s ear that it might not be too good for Nike to have Michael Jordan as the face of the company,” Lee revealed to Sole Collector. He added that there were worries that Jordan “might not appeal to white America, or the general market as a whole.”

Jordan, obviously, transcended the market and everything else.

But Jordan had his doubters and had his rough patches. He got his head handed to him year after year by the Bad Boy Pistons, who taught him how to win the hard way. He was thought of as the guy who couldn’t win the big one, who was too selfish a player to lead a team to a title.

In hindsight, it’s laughable. But that’s what you get when you try to define a person’s legacy before his career is over.