NBA finals, Lakers Celtics: Los Angeles incentivitzing players to play intelligently

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The Lakers’ methods of motivating their players to make hustle plays may seem unconventional, but it actually makes a ton of sense. According to Shelley Smith of ESPN Los Angeles, Laker players are compensated for taking charges while they’re also docked money for “illegal defense” (or defensive three-second) violations:

Last series, Phil Jackson called his big men “thin-chested” as a way
of goading them into standing strong and taking a hit, and the team has
been offering financial incentive — $50 per charge…The
money comes out of a pool accumulated by players’ fines, such as being
whistled for an illegal defense, which costs a player $25. It is a
fund, Hamblen says, to which Lamar Odom is the biggest contributor. “I
mean, I just pencil him in every night for illegal defense,” Hamblen
said. “I ask him every night, ‘Lamar, you know the illegal defense
rules don’t you?'”

The charge-taking competition, however, has yet to involve Ron Artest,
who said he learned from growing up on the New York playgrounds, that
when you take a charge, fall and then call an offensive foul, well, bad
things — like serious bodily harm — can happen. “I don’t
even know how to take a charge,” he said. “To get the charge you have
to fall. I’d rather not fall. You call an offensive foul, possibly be a
fight. That’s just how we grew up playing basketball.”

It’s a clever idea that more teams would be smart to employ. Even if $50 may not seem like much to an NBA player with a massive guaranteed contract, everyone can use a little extra spending money.

I will call shenanigans on Artest’s claims, though. The man is many things — a strong defender, a good teammate, a bit loony, a hilarious post-game interviewee — but what he’s not is some basketball purist that’s above drawing an offensive foul. Ron can flop with the best of ’em. Artest ranked third on the Lakers this season in charges drawn at 0.21 per game, behind only Derek Fisher (0.59 per game) and Pau Gasol (0.25 per game).

The tough guy act is cute and it’s sure to convince plenty of folks, but Ron is not a guy that the Lakers need to pay to take a charge. He may not square up under the basket and wait for a defender just outside the restricted area Varejao-style, but he’ll flail a bit when an opponent uses an arm bar to push off or lowers their shoulder on a drive. Maybe he doesn’t consider that flopping, but the $50s in his wallet probably do.

Report: Pistons monitoring Markieff Morris situation

Markieff Morris, Marcus Morris
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Markieff Morris made a lot of noise this summer about being unhappy in Phoenix and wanting out, after the Suns traded his twin brother Marcus to the Pistons as part of a salary dump. He openly demanded a trade, and said on the record several times that his long-term future is not with the team. He’s changed his tune since training camp started, once he realized he has no choice but to play for the Suns unless they decide to trade him. But according to the Detroit Free Press‘ Vincent Ellis, there is interest from the one team he would be guaranteed to want to play for:

Markieff’s unhappiness with the Suns started when they traded his brother, so he would obviously jump at the chance to reunite with Marcus. And they don’t have much in the way of power forward depth beyond the other Morris twin and Ersan Ilyasova, so it would be a good fit from a basketball standpoint. But with the brothers’ felony assault charges pending, reuniting them on the same roster might not be the best idea, and it also opens up the possibility of having to trade one of them in the future and the other one being unhappy. So far, the Suns have shown no inclination to trade Markieff, but if that changes, the Pistons are an interesting destination to keep an eye on.

Popovich to Aldridge: “Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit” out practice.

LaMarcus Aldridge
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Gregg Popovich’s habit of resting key players at times has become the norm around the league as more and more studies have shown it helps players perform at higher levels plus helps reduce injury risk. Still, Popovich is the poster child.

New Spur LaMarcus Aldridge wasn’t used to this but got introduced to it in a very Popovich way, reports Jeff McDonald at the Express-News.

LaMarcus Aldridge missed his first workout of training camp today with leg tightness. Or rather, the Spurs — being the Spurs — held him out for precautionary reasons.

“We sat him out,” coach Gregg Popovich said. “He didn’t want to do it. I said, ‘Welcome to the Spurs. Go sit.’”

He might as well have added “get used to this.” Aldridge is going to get some rest this season. Not as many as Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili, and Tony Parker, but he’s going to get some nights off.

Remember, Aldridge is a guy who played through a torn ligament in his thumb last season because he thought the Blazers could make noise in the playoffs (and they might have had Wesley Matthews not gotten hurt). He’s not a guy used to being told to sit and rest.

It’s his “Welcome to the Spurs” moment.