NBA finals, Lakers Celtics: Rajon Rondo's defensive impact could be minimized

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rondo_defense.pngRajon Rondo should be relieved. After facing a few games’ worth of staggered screens set by Orlando’s bigs, L.A. will assuredly not be employing a similar strategy to wear down Rondo in the finals; running an offense centered around Derek Fisher’s dribble penetration would be both baffling and hilarious, akin to ignoring the finer works of Dennis Hopper’s oeuvre when making a tribute compilation in favor of extended, unaltered scenes from Meet the Deedles.

Instead, Rondo’s defensive role in the series will be a bit more complex than merely shutting down his positional opposite. Limiting Jameer Nelson’s influence as much as possible was an important component of the Celtics’ game plan in the conference finals, but Rondo’s defensive strengths will be a bit more difficult to deploy against the triangle offense.

On the one hand, having a less demanding defensive assignment would theoretically open up Rondo to roam defensively. He could use his length, quickness, and defensive instincts to jump passing lanes and force turnovers with double teams. However, Fish has proven throughout this playoff run that he can still command attention at this stage in his career. He’s not a threat to get to the rim, but if Rondo strays too far from Fisher, Derek could easily nail corner three after corner three.

That’s why a guy like Fisher can still be of use, even at his advanced age. Even if he lacks the quickness he once had, his ability to knock down shots demands that defenses account for him. That one singular skill will prevent Rondo from fully utilizing his defensive abilities in the finals, as one of the better point guard defenders in the game will be left shadowing a spot-up shooter.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Just as we’ve seen the Lakers use Ron Artest as a primary perimeter defender in order to conserve Kobe Bryant’s energy for late-game offense, Rondo’s low-pressure defensive assignment should free him up to attack the Lakers on the other end.

The threat of Fisher’s offense may be a slight inconvenience for Rondo, but the threat of Rondo’s offense is a nightmare for Fisher. Even if Boston can’t make the most of Rajon’s defensive abilities in this match-up, he’s still likely to be the most important Celtic on the floor due to his ability to attack Fish a la Russell Westbrook.

Still, what Doc Rivers and Tom Thibodeau elect to do with Rondo on the defensive end is something to watch. Finding the balance between Rajon making a big defensive impact while not wearing him out or giving Fisher too many looks is tricky, but Thibs is one of the best in the biz at knowing just when and where to apply defensive pressure.

Dwyane Wade says Bulls’ showers had no hot water in Boston

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The Bulls suffered a rough loss in Boston last night.

It didn’t get better afterward.

K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune:

Celtics general manager Danny Ainge – who played for Boston in the 80s – pleaded ignorance to any nefarious plumbing:

I think the idea that teams plot to shut off the visitor’s hot water is often overstated. Arenas have complex infrastructure, and things can go wrong on their own. Sometimes, the home team loses hot water, but that never gets remembered.

But reasonable excuses don’t make a cold shower in the moment any more tolerable.

Robin Lopez pushes short floater over backboard (video)

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Robin Lopez had reason to be upset from the Bulls’ Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

This miss was all on him.

Dwyane Wade plays the laziest defense you’ll ever see (video)

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Dwyane Wade (26 points, 11 rebounds, eight assists) was the Bulls’ best player in their Game 5 loss to the Celtics last night.

But the 35-year-old guard clearly didn’t go all out on every possession.

Players can justify not closing out by claiming they were prioritizing rebounding position. Wade clearly has no such excuse.

Video Breakdown: Clippers use JJ Redick in split cut to fool Jazz at 3-point line

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The Los Angeles Clippers dropped Game 5 to the Utah Jazz on Tuesday night, and find themselves down 3-2 as they head back to Salt Lake City for Game 6. The Clippers have had to deal with Utah’s formidable defense, so much so that they’ve built in counters to Jazz defenders overplaying shooters like JJ Redick.

One example of this countering method could be found in Game 3, when the Clippers ran a split cut for Redick. Instead of fighting endlessly around screens for a 3-point shot as you might expect, LA took the easy route and simply cut Redick to the basket for an easy layup as a means to take advantage of an overeager defender.

We’ve talked about the Split Cut here on NBA Playbook before. The Los Angeles Lakers used it earlier in the season to beat the Golden State Warriors, the team that uses the split cut perhaps the most out of any team in the NBA.

Other teams, including the Portland Trail Blazers, have adapted the Warriors’ use of the split cut as a counter for their own offense this season, which is a testament to just how useful it is.

If you need a reminder, a split cut all about a screener coming up to screen, then cutting toward the basket before his screen action fully takes place. It’s about timing, and catching defenders off guard when they go to set up their recover positions for screens.

For a full breakdown on the split cut and how the Clippers used it, watch the video above.