NBA finals, Lakers Celtics: Rajon Rondo's defensive impact could be minimized


rondo_defense.pngRajon Rondo should be relieved. After facing a few games’ worth of staggered screens set by Orlando’s bigs, L.A. will assuredly not be employing a similar strategy to wear down Rondo in the finals; running an offense centered around Derek Fisher’s dribble penetration would be both baffling and hilarious, akin to ignoring the finer works of Dennis Hopper’s oeuvre when making a tribute compilation in favor of extended, unaltered scenes from Meet the Deedles.

Instead, Rondo’s defensive role in the series will be a bit more complex than merely shutting down his positional opposite. Limiting Jameer Nelson’s influence as much as possible was an important component of the Celtics’ game plan in the conference finals, but Rondo’s defensive strengths will be a bit more difficult to deploy against the triangle offense.

On the one hand, having a less demanding defensive assignment would theoretically open up Rondo to roam defensively. He could use his length, quickness, and defensive instincts to jump passing lanes and force turnovers with double teams. However, Fish has proven throughout this playoff run that he can still command attention at this stage in his career. He’s not a threat to get to the rim, but if Rondo strays too far from Fisher, Derek could easily nail corner three after corner three.

That’s why a guy like Fisher can still be of use, even at his advanced age. Even if he lacks the quickness he once had, his ability to knock down shots demands that defenses account for him. That one singular skill will prevent Rondo from fully utilizing his defensive abilities in the finals, as one of the better point guard defenders in the game will be left shadowing a spot-up shooter.

That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Just as we’ve seen the Lakers use Ron Artest as a primary perimeter defender in order to conserve Kobe Bryant’s energy for late-game offense, Rondo’s low-pressure defensive assignment should free him up to attack the Lakers on the other end.

The threat of Fisher’s offense may be a slight inconvenience for Rondo, but the threat of Rondo’s offense is a nightmare for Fisher. Even if Boston can’t make the most of Rajon’s defensive abilities in this match-up, he’s still likely to be the most important Celtic on the floor due to his ability to attack Fish a la Russell Westbrook.

Still, what Doc Rivers and Tom Thibodeau elect to do with Rondo on the defensive end is something to watch. Finding the balance between Rajon making a big defensive impact while not wearing him out or giving Fisher too many looks is tricky, but Thibs is one of the best in the biz at knowing just when and where to apply defensive pressure.

Matt Barnes says he went to house because his son looked distressed

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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So far, the only substantive accounts of the Matt Barnes-Derek Fisher altercation have come from anonymous sources.

The Knicks coach has deflected questions.

But Barnes is giving his account, at least of the lead-up.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

It’s completely understandable that Barnes would act to ensure his children’s welfare.

And let’s say everything he said is true. It still leaves important questions unanswered.

Did Barnes – as he reportedly texted a friend he did – beat up Fisher and spit on his estranged wife, Gloria Govan? If so, why did Barnes deem that necessary to protect kids?

Gregg Popovich resting himself for Spurs game at Sacramento

Gregg Popovich
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Gregg Popovich said he wouldn’t coach in July.

Apparently, he’s taking off part of October, too.

Marc J. Spears of Yahoo Sports:

It’s not that surprising to see Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Boris Diaw staying home. Veterans miss preseason games all the time just to rest. With the Spurs, it happens even in the regular season.

But it’s still a little strange to see the head coach sit out, even though Popovich also did it last year.

It makes sense, though. Who cares about this preseason game? If travelling less helps the 66-year-old Popovich stay fresh in the years ahead, that’s well worth it. Plus, it gets Messina a little extra experience. Some day, he might be the head coach.