The Magic really, really need to get Dwight Howard moving

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It’s already obvious to anyone who’s been watching the Magic-Celtics series that Dwight Howard has been much more successful on the move against the Celtics defense than he has been when the Magic force-feed Howard in the post. Today, both Ben Q. Rock of Orlando Pinstriped Post and Eddy Rivera both went to the Synergy to find some numbers that show just how important getting Howard moving is to the Magic. 

Over on Orlando Pinstriped Post, Ben points out that Howard has gone 14-36 from the field on post-ups in this series, including 5-16 from his favorite spot on the left block. Overall, Howard has produced 49 points in 58 post-up possessions over the past four games. Meanwhile, he’s produced 22 points on only 17 possessions that involved Howard cutting off the ball or being the “roll man” in a pick-and-roll. According to Eddy Rivera, the Magic made a much greater effort to utilize the pick-and-roll in game four than they did earlier in the series — in fact, the Magic ran 43 pick-and-rolls in game four after only running 33 pick-and-rolls in the first three games of the series combined. 

It’s easy to say that the Magic need to run more pick-and-rolls, because they do. But give Boston a lot of credit — they rotate as well as any team in the league, and a big reason the Magic have run so few pick-and-rolls is that the Magic have seen it coming and gotten in between the ballhandler and Howard to prevent the Magic from completing the play. Also, teams playing from behind tend to go to their failsafe sets, which generally means putting the ball in the hands of their best player as quickly as possible. For the Cavaliers, that failsafe set was giving the ball to LeBron at the top of the key and letting him go to work, which the Celtics were ready to stop. For the Magic, the failsafe is dumping the ball to Howard, which the Celtics are shutting down with ease. Advanced sets and plays run for role players tend to shut down when teams are nervous and playing from behind, especially in a big playoff series like this one. Running more pick-and-roll is one thing the Magic need to do to pull off a miracle against the Celtics, but it’s far from the only thing. 

PBT Extra bold prediction previews: No, Lakers are not playoff bound

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When you ask Lakers fans for bold predictions, you get the delusional to come out of the woodwork.

Most Lakers fans I know — remember, I’m a former Laker blogger living in So Cal, even my optometrist wants to talk Lakers during my eye exam — are realistic about where the team is in the rebuild process. Like me, they want to see a healthy season of Kobe Bryant where he can choose whether or not to continue his career on his terms, not Father Time’s.

But Lakers exceptionalism is a thing, and there are Lakers fans living in a fantasy land.

That’s what Jenna Corrado and I get to in the latest PBT Extra: There are Lakers fans that think they are playoff bound. And there are people who expect even more than that from this team this year — like Kobe Bryant to return to MVP form. Those people need to stop taking so much glaucoma medication.

Thabo Sefolosha’s lawyer: White police officer targeted black Hawks forward

Thabo Sefolosha
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NEW YORK (AP) — A lawyer representing a professional basketball player arrested outside a New York City nightclub has told a jury his client was targeted because he’s black.

Attorney Alex Spiro said Tuesday in Manhattan Criminal Court that a white police officer saw a black man in a hoodie when he confronted the Atlanta Hawks’ Thabo Sefolosha on April 8.

Sefolosha was arrested while leaving a Manhattan nightclub following a stabbing. He subsequently suffered a season-ending leg fracture after a confrontation with police.

A prosecutor said in opening statements that Sefolosha called an officer who repeatedly told him and others to leave a “midget.”

Sefolosha pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor obstructing government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest charges. The Swiss citizen declined a plea deal from prosecutors.