Wesley Matthews is going to get paid by somebody, but will it be the Jazz?

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Life’s not all that easy for undrafted players in the NBA, who typically have to fight and claw just to find a place on a roster. That wasn’t the case for Wesley Matthews, who was fortunate enough to be signed by the Jazz after spending four years playing for Marquette. It didn’t take a trip to the D-League or a tour through Europe for Matthews to stay NBA relevant after failing to be selected in the draft, and for that he should definitely be considered fortunate.

Then, injuries to several of Utah’s wing players opened up playing time and shot attempts for Matthews, who was able to average almost 25 minutes in 48 games. Plus, the cost-conscious Jazz shipped out Ronnie Brewer, who almost certainly would have stolen away Matthews’ minutes, to the Memphis Grizzlies for purely financial reasons. As far as undrafted rookies go, Matthews has received just about every break he could possibly ask for, and he’s made the most of the opportunities he’s been given.

Now the Jazz will have to pay for it.

The perk of being a second round pick or undrafted rookie is that the rookie scale doesn’t apply, meaning that if a player like Matthews can make a decent splash in a season or two, they can reach their first notable payday that much sooner. That should be the case with Wesley this summer, as he proved he’s a capable rotation player with the Jazz this season. There’s no star power here, just a competent defender and low-usage scorer. No one should have to break open the piggy bank to sign Matthews to a new deal, but he’s definitely due for a raise from his sub-$1 million salary this season.

The only question is whether or not he’ll stay with Utah. The system fits well with Matthews’ talents, and it’s clear that Jerry Sloan is a fan. That said, the Jazz will have a number of decisions to make this off-season regarding a number of free agents, both in-house and elsewhere. From Ross Siler of the Salt Lake Tribune:

The Jazz’s best chance for an impact addition might come with the first-round pick they own from New York. The draft lottery will be held May 18, but if the draft order holds, the Jazz would be left with the No. 9 pick.

…As for their current roster, the Jazz have seven players under contract to return next season in Williams, Okur, Paul Millsap, Andrei Kirilenko, C.J. Miles, Ronnie Price and Kosta Koufos. Those seven players are set to make $56.7 million for the 2010-11 season.

The NBA’s latest projections call for next season’s luxury-tax threshold to be set at $68 million. Assuming they end up with the No. 9 pick, the Jazz’s newest rookie would be expected to make $2.4 million next season.

That would leave the Jazz about $9 million to spend in deciding about re-signing free agents Boozer, Wesley Matthews, Kyle Korver and Kyrylo Fesenko without pushing their payroll into luxury-tax territory for the second consecutive season.

Let’s assume that Boozer has his bags packed and sits anxiously on the curb waiting for his taxi. As Siler noted, $9 million will be the magic number for the Jazz this off-season, and they’ll have to divide that salary up amongst Matthews, Korver, Fesenko, and any other free agents they’re targeting. That’s not much coin to fill Boozer’s void while retaining those players, who were all part of Utah’s rotation at various points in the season.

Fesenko may not be a stud, but he was decent for the Jazz in the playoffs and could provide a cheap insurance policy should Mehmet Okur’s recovery take longer than anticipated. Korver does have some value for Utah, though he definitely qualifies as a specialist and holds limited value aside from his shooting.

Where things should get particularly interesting is in where the Jazz end up in the draft lottery. Should Utah move up thanks to the favorable bounces of a few ping pong balls, that $9 million figure would actually decrease as the set price of their first round pick goes up. That lottery pick’s salary bump could ironically be the factor that pushes Matthews out of the mix. Utah has been trying to dodge the luxury tax like the plague, and should Wesley’s new contract not fit neatly into their salary space under the tax line, he may hit the open market.

The other factor is how confident the Jazz are in Paul Millsap’s ability to replace Carlos Boozer’s production. If Sloan and Kevin O’Connor don’t have complete faith in Millsap, they could look to replace some of Boozer’s scoring and rebounding with another big in free agency. That would leave even less available salary (or maybe none at all) for Korver, Fesenko, and Matthews.

There’s no doom and gloom here; someone is going to sign Wesley Matthews this summer, and maybe it will be Utah. The odds just seem slim that he’ll stay in SLC, and soon Matthews may join Eric Maynor and Ronnie Brewer as the Jazz turned ex-Jazz thanks to Greg Miller and the Miller family’s aversion to the luxury tax.

Joel Embiid frustrated, wants more post touches, to play back-to-backs

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Joel Embiid remains a frustrated man.

He wants to be unleashed on the NBA, and he feels he’s being held back.

Part of that is not playing in back-to-backs — Embiid started Friday night against Boston but will sit out by plan Saturday night against the Raptors in Toronto. Embiid knows the plan to help protect a body that has played only 31 games in three seasons before this one and was not cleared for most of training camp, but that doesn’t mean he likes it, as he told Jessica Camerato of NBC Sports Philadelphia.

“I just want to feel like an NBA player,” Embiid said.  “I feel like I’m not an NBA player because I can’t play back-to-back.”

I get his frustration, but can you blame the Sixers for treating the guy like he’s made of glass at this point? Hopefully, later in the season, he can be cleared to play on both ends.

His second frustration came from the loss to the Cavaliers on Friday — he wants more post touches. In the video above he is clear, “I didn’t get the ball enough in the post.”

He’s right here. Embiid had three post-ups all game, one in each of the game’s first three quarters (stat via Synergy Sports). Embiid is efficient in the post — he has shot 9-of-12 on those plays overall this season and the Sixers score 1.33 points per possession when he does. Especially against a team going small — the Cavaliers start Kevin Love at center — Embiid should be fed down low.

Instead, look at his shot chart from Friday night.

Part of this is on him with all the threes, but they have to utilize him better. It’s part of the Sixers growing pains that will come this season.

Nets’ national anthem singer kneels to finish performance

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NEW YORK (AP)—  The national anthem singer at the Brooklyn Nets’ home opener took a knee at the end of her performance.

Justine Skye was nearing the completion of the song Friday night when she went to one knee for the finish. There were some cheers, but appeared to be more boos from the crowd at Barclays Center to see the Nets play the Orlando Magic.

NBA players have continued to stand during the playing of the anthems, as required by league rule.

Mavericks’ rookie guard Dennis Smith Jr. misses game with knee swelling

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DALLAS (AP) — Dallas Mavericks rookie point guard Dennis Smith Jr. missed Friday’s game against the Sacramento Kings with swelling in his left knee.

Smith, the ninth pick in the NBA draft out of North Carolina State, had 16 points and 10 assists in the Mavericks’ season-opening loss to the Atlanta Hawks.

Smith participated in the Mavericks’ shootaround on Friday morning and was a late scratch. It is not known if Smith will play Saturday for Dallas.

The Mavericks were also missing guard Devin Harris, who was granted leave of absence after his brother died on Thursday.

Watch Lonzo Ball’s 29 point, 11 rebound, 9 assist game Friday night

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This was more of what fans expected from Lonzo Ball.

After a rough first game against the Clippers — with Patrick Beverley in his face all night — Ball found plenty of room to operate against the soft defense of the Phoenix Suns. With room to operate Ball had 29 points, 11 rebounds, and nine assists — just one assist short of a triple-double. He helped the Lakers pull away to a lead in the third then hold on for a 132-130 win over the Suns.

Ball wasn’t terribly efficient, 12-of-27 shooting, but he was 4-of-9 from three, he played with great pace, he was decisive, and was finding guys with his passes. It was a step forward, even if it was against a sad defense (Eric Bledsoe can be a good defender, but he has seemed disinterested in recent years).

Ball and the Lakers are going to be up and down this season, the goal is for there to be more ups near the end of the season.