Wesley Matthews is going to get paid by somebody, but will it be the Jazz?

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Life’s not all that easy for undrafted players in the NBA, who typically have to fight and claw just to find a place on a roster. That wasn’t the case for Wesley Matthews, who was fortunate enough to be signed by the Jazz after spending four years playing for Marquette. It didn’t take a trip to the D-League or a tour through Europe for Matthews to stay NBA relevant after failing to be selected in the draft, and for that he should definitely be considered fortunate.

Then, injuries to several of Utah’s wing players opened up playing time and shot attempts for Matthews, who was able to average almost 25 minutes in 48 games. Plus, the cost-conscious Jazz shipped out Ronnie Brewer, who almost certainly would have stolen away Matthews’ minutes, to the Memphis Grizzlies for purely financial reasons. As far as undrafted rookies go, Matthews has received just about every break he could possibly ask for, and he’s made the most of the opportunities he’s been given.

Now the Jazz will have to pay for it.

The perk of being a second round pick or undrafted rookie is that the rookie scale doesn’t apply, meaning that if a player like Matthews can make a decent splash in a season or two, they can reach their first notable payday that much sooner. That should be the case with Wesley this summer, as he proved he’s a capable rotation player with the Jazz this season. There’s no star power here, just a competent defender and low-usage scorer. No one should have to break open the piggy bank to sign Matthews to a new deal, but he’s definitely due for a raise from his sub-$1 million salary this season.

The only question is whether or not he’ll stay with Utah. The system fits well with Matthews’ talents, and it’s clear that Jerry Sloan is a fan. That said, the Jazz will have a number of decisions to make this off-season regarding a number of free agents, both in-house and elsewhere. From Ross Siler of the Salt Lake Tribune:

The Jazz’s best chance for an impact addition might come with the first-round pick they own from New York. The draft lottery will be held May 18, but if the draft order holds, the Jazz would be left with the No. 9 pick.

…As for their current roster, the Jazz have seven players under contract to return next season in Williams, Okur, Paul Millsap, Andrei Kirilenko, C.J. Miles, Ronnie Price and Kosta Koufos. Those seven players are set to make $56.7 million for the 2010-11 season.

The NBA’s latest projections call for next season’s luxury-tax threshold to be set at $68 million. Assuming they end up with the No. 9 pick, the Jazz’s newest rookie would be expected to make $2.4 million next season.

That would leave the Jazz about $9 million to spend in deciding about re-signing free agents Boozer, Wesley Matthews, Kyle Korver and Kyrylo Fesenko without pushing their payroll into luxury-tax territory for the second consecutive season.

Let’s assume that Boozer has his bags packed and sits anxiously on the curb waiting for his taxi. As Siler noted, $9 million will be the magic number for the Jazz this off-season, and they’ll have to divide that salary up amongst Matthews, Korver, Fesenko, and any other free agents they’re targeting. That’s not much coin to fill Boozer’s void while retaining those players, who were all part of Utah’s rotation at various points in the season.

Fesenko may not be a stud, but he was decent for the Jazz in the playoffs and could provide a cheap insurance policy should Mehmet Okur’s recovery take longer than anticipated. Korver does have some value for Utah, though he definitely qualifies as a specialist and holds limited value aside from his shooting.

Where things should get particularly interesting is in where the Jazz end up in the draft lottery. Should Utah move up thanks to the favorable bounces of a few ping pong balls, that $9 million figure would actually decrease as the set price of their first round pick goes up. That lottery pick’s salary bump could ironically be the factor that pushes Matthews out of the mix. Utah has been trying to dodge the luxury tax like the plague, and should Wesley’s new contract not fit neatly into their salary space under the tax line, he may hit the open market.

The other factor is how confident the Jazz are in Paul Millsap’s ability to replace Carlos Boozer’s production. If Sloan and Kevin O’Connor don’t have complete faith in Millsap, they could look to replace some of Boozer’s scoring and rebounding with another big in free agency. That would leave even less available salary (or maybe none at all) for Korver, Fesenko, and Matthews.

There’s no doom and gloom here; someone is going to sign Wesley Matthews this summer, and maybe it will be Utah. The odds just seem slim that he’ll stay in SLC, and soon Matthews may join Eric Maynor and Ronnie Brewer as the Jazz turned ex-Jazz thanks to Greg Miller and the Miller family’s aversion to the luxury tax.

Jimmy Butler leaves game with apparently serious right knee injury

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The Basketball Gods have not been appeased, and apparently have dealt the NBA another serious injury to a star player.

Jimmy Butler — Minnesota’s leader, an All-Star, and a guy having a fringe of the MVP ballot NBA season — went down grabbing his knee on this play against the Rockets Friday night.

Butler reportedly said “it’s torn” while being helped off the court.

After the game, Tom Thibodeau said it was a right knee injury that would be re-evaluated with an MRI tomorrow.

This is a non-contact injury that has the appearance of an ACL tear (hope that is not the case). Butler had ripped an offensive rebound away from Nene and was making a move to go back up when he went to the ground grabbing his knee.

Butler leads the NBA in minutes played per game. He was selected an All-Star but chose to sit out that game because he said he needed rest for the rest of the season. His coach, Tom Thibodeau, has a reputation for running players into exhaustion with heavy use (ask Joakim Noah) and does not subscribe to the kind of rest we see in Golden State, San Antonio, and other elite programs trying to keep players fresh.

This is troubling for a Timberwolves team looking to end an 11-year playoff drought — Minnesota is -8.3 points per 100 possessions when Butler is not on the court this season. While tied for the three seed going into Friday night, Minnesota is just four games from falling out of the playoffs in a competitive West.

Jimmy Butler to Lou Williams on All-Star snub: put up $100K for 1-on-1 game

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Jimmy Butler earned his spot on the All-Star team — he’s had an All-NBA, bottom of the MVP ballot level season. He deserved the trip to Los Angeles.

But when he got there, Butler didn’t play in the All-Star Game itself, saying he needed to rest. That frustrated a few All-Star snubs, and Lou Williams called him out on it.

Butler fired back before the Timberwolves took on the Houston Rockets.

“My thing is this, to Lou or anyone else who thinks they’re an All-Star, with all due respect, LeBron and them got $100,000 for winning, so if you got $100k to put up, you guard me I guard you, I’ gonna show you why. All this talk, put $100,000 up and I’ll show you why and where I’m at.” (That may have been paraphrased)

Butler earned his spot, he deserved to be there. He can do as he sees fit.

But if you’re not going to roll out there for even five minutes (LaMarcus Aldridge played four and nobody is saying anything to him), then give the spot up to someone else. You don’t need the $100K that badly.

Kevin Durant no fan of one-and-done, says he would have come straight to NBA

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With the money funneled to future NBA players through agents in the spotlight thanks to a FBI investigation (one that doesn’t even get into the money from boosters and shoe companies), the one-and-done rule the NBA has for players sending them to college for a semester of cakewalk classes one year has come back in the spotlight.

The league and players’ union are discussing changing the rule — with some input from the NCAA. If they want Kevin Durant‘s advice, scrap the whole thing — he would have come straight to the NBA if he could have.

“You want these players to go out there and play on the biggest stage. The Final Four is one of the biggest sporting events in the world, in sports, and they don’t get a dime for it. I don’t think it’s right

“If they want to come out of high school, it should be on them. You know what I mean? You can’t control everything. So if they feel as though they’re ready, that’s on them. They want to make a decision on their life, that’s on them. If they don’t get drafted, it’s on them. You can try to control it, but you’re still not really doing anything.”

Would Durant have come out from high school rather than spend a season at Texas?

“Yeah, probably. I needed the money.”

The NBA is discussing changes, and they want to see the recommendations from Condoleezza Rice’s NCAA commission. But the league’s owners are not all on the same page.

“In terms of the NBA, we’re conflicted, to be honest…” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said All-Star weekend. “And from a league standpoint, on one hand, we think we have a better draft when we’ve had an opportunity to see these young players play an elite level before they come into the NBA.

“On the other hand, I think the question for the league is, in terms of their ultimate success, are we better off intersecting with them a little bit younger? Are we better off bringing them into the league when they’re 18 using our G League as it was designed to be as a Development League and getting them minutes on the court there? And there is also recognition that for some of these elite players, there is no question that they can perform in the NBA at 18 years old.”

There seems to be some momentum toward a “baseball rule” compromise — players can come to the NBA straight out of high school, but if they go to college they have to stay for at least two years. Unlike the last time high schoolers were rushing into the NBA, most teams are far better prepared to develop young players and be patient with them. There will still be busts — there are even with guys who spent years in college — but teams are in better positions to make it work.

The other thing I would want to see: If a player signs with an agent out of high school, does not get drafted, give him the chance to go to college still. Some young men are going to get terrible advice (from family, AAU coaches, friends, a whole lot of people) and they deserve a chance to choose a better path.

Report: Hawks near buyout with Ersan Ilyasova; Bucks, Raptors interested

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This is about as big a surprise as my wife crying during “This Is Us,” but it sounds like it’s about to go down.

The Hawks and Ersan Ilyasova are close to a buyout, reports Michael Cunningham at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Hawks and forward Ersan Ilyasova tentatively agreed to a buyout of the remainder of his contract, according to a person familiar with the negotiations. Once Ilyasova accepts a buyout and clears waivers, as expected, he will be free to sign with any other team for the rest of the season.

Ilyasova’s contract expires at the end of the season and he is eligible to become a free agent in the summer. Earlier this month, Ilyasova invoked his right to reject the trade offers the Hawks presented to him.

Where might he land on the buyout market?

A lot of teams could use a 6’10” guy who can space the floor as a shooter. Ilyasova signed a one-year, $6 million contract with the Hawks this season. He’s averaged 10.9 points per game, shooting 35.9 percent from three this season, and missed some time with a shoulder injury.

Ilyasova is solid as a spot-up guy but is more dangerous as a screen setter where he can pop out and space the floor, or roll and use his size inside. He’s also good at cutting and working off the ball, plus will get a team a few offensive rebounds. He’s not a game changer, but in certain matchups, he could help teams a lot.