Wesley Matthews is going to get paid by somebody, but will it be the Jazz?

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Life’s not all that easy for undrafted players in the NBA, who typically have to fight and claw just to find a place on a roster. That wasn’t the case for Wesley Matthews, who was fortunate enough to be signed by the Jazz after spending four years playing for Marquette. It didn’t take a trip to the D-League or a tour through Europe for Matthews to stay NBA relevant after failing to be selected in the draft, and for that he should definitely be considered fortunate.

Then, injuries to several of Utah’s wing players opened up playing time and shot attempts for Matthews, who was able to average almost 25 minutes in 48 games. Plus, the cost-conscious Jazz shipped out Ronnie Brewer, who almost certainly would have stolen away Matthews’ minutes, to the Memphis Grizzlies for purely financial reasons. As far as undrafted rookies go, Matthews has received just about every break he could possibly ask for, and he’s made the most of the opportunities he’s been given.

Now the Jazz will have to pay for it.

The perk of being a second round pick or undrafted rookie is that the rookie scale doesn’t apply, meaning that if a player like Matthews can make a decent splash in a season or two, they can reach their first notable payday that much sooner. That should be the case with Wesley this summer, as he proved he’s a capable rotation player with the Jazz this season. There’s no star power here, just a competent defender and low-usage scorer. No one should have to break open the piggy bank to sign Matthews to a new deal, but he’s definitely due for a raise from his sub-$1 million salary this season.

The only question is whether or not he’ll stay with Utah. The system fits well with Matthews’ talents, and it’s clear that Jerry Sloan is a fan. That said, the Jazz will have a number of decisions to make this off-season regarding a number of free agents, both in-house and elsewhere. From Ross Siler of the Salt Lake Tribune:

The Jazz’s best chance for an impact addition might come with the first-round pick they own from New York. The draft lottery will be held May 18, but if the draft order holds, the Jazz would be left with the No. 9 pick.

…As for their current roster, the Jazz have seven players under contract to return next season in Williams, Okur, Paul Millsap, Andrei Kirilenko, C.J. Miles, Ronnie Price and Kosta Koufos. Those seven players are set to make $56.7 million for the 2010-11 season.

The NBA’s latest projections call for next season’s luxury-tax threshold to be set at $68 million. Assuming they end up with the No. 9 pick, the Jazz’s newest rookie would be expected to make $2.4 million next season.

That would leave the Jazz about $9 million to spend in deciding about re-signing free agents Boozer, Wesley Matthews, Kyle Korver and Kyrylo Fesenko without pushing their payroll into luxury-tax territory for the second consecutive season.

Let’s assume that Boozer has his bags packed and sits anxiously on the curb waiting for his taxi. As Siler noted, $9 million will be the magic number for the Jazz this off-season, and they’ll have to divide that salary up amongst Matthews, Korver, Fesenko, and any other free agents they’re targeting. That’s not much coin to fill Boozer’s void while retaining those players, who were all part of Utah’s rotation at various points in the season.

Fesenko may not be a stud, but he was decent for the Jazz in the playoffs and could provide a cheap insurance policy should Mehmet Okur’s recovery take longer than anticipated. Korver does have some value for Utah, though he definitely qualifies as a specialist and holds limited value aside from his shooting.

Where things should get particularly interesting is in where the Jazz end up in the draft lottery. Should Utah move up thanks to the favorable bounces of a few ping pong balls, that $9 million figure would actually decrease as the set price of their first round pick goes up. That lottery pick’s salary bump could ironically be the factor that pushes Matthews out of the mix. Utah has been trying to dodge the luxury tax like the plague, and should Wesley’s new contract not fit neatly into their salary space under the tax line, he may hit the open market.

The other factor is how confident the Jazz are in Paul Millsap’s ability to replace Carlos Boozer’s production. If Sloan and Kevin O’Connor don’t have complete faith in Millsap, they could look to replace some of Boozer’s scoring and rebounding with another big in free agency. That would leave even less available salary (or maybe none at all) for Korver, Fesenko, and Matthews.

There’s no doom and gloom here; someone is going to sign Wesley Matthews this summer, and maybe it will be Utah. The odds just seem slim that he’ll stay in SLC, and soon Matthews may join Eric Maynor and Ronnie Brewer as the Jazz turned ex-Jazz thanks to Greg Miller and the Miller family’s aversion to the luxury tax.

Cameraman runs onto court during play of Spurs-Mavericks (video)

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The Spurs’ 94-87 win over the Mavericks on Wednesday didn’t produce the Gregg Popovich fireworks that followed San Antonio’s last win over Dallas.

But Wednesday’s game still featured a very strange moment, when a cameraman ran onto the floor during play.

I’m not so bothered by the cameraman. He clearly thought a timeout had been called, potentially getting confused by the shot-clock buzzer sounding. It’s not ideal, but mistakes happen.

But why did the officials allow play to continue? That was absurd (though, thankfully, irrelevant).

(hat tip: reddit user Pontus_Pilates)

Nerlens Noel on prior criticism of 76ers: ‘I don’t think the roster’s changed’

CAMDEN, NJ - SEPTEMBER 26: Nerlens Noel #4 of the Philadelphia 76ers looks on during media day on September 26, 2016 in Camden, New Jersey. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
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Before the season, Nerlens Noel called the 76ers’ center situation – with himself, Joel Embiid and Jahlil Okafor – “silly.”

Philadelphia general manager Bryan Colangelo advised Noel to stay in his place. 76ers coach Brett Brown told Noel focusing on his strengths would yield a big payday. Noel has mostly been away from the team while rehabbing from surgery.

Has any of that changed Noel’s perspective?

Noel, via Jessica Camerato of CSN Philly:

“I don’t think the roster’s changed,” Noel said Thursday. “So, I don’t think the roster’s changed.”

Noel didn’t seem concerned that he wouldn’t fit back in with the team after being away for the start of the season. He envisions his role as simply “being Nerlens Noel.” What exactly that will entail will unfold this season.

“I put myself in a different place with all these things,” Noel said. “Do what you can control. That’s what I give power to, is what I can really control. I think right now I’m in a good place mentally, I think my body feels great and I just want to get back to playing basketball and let things take care of themselves.”

This sounds like someone who still wants out.

In fact, the 76ers have only gotten bigger, trading combo forward Jerami Grant to the Thunder for power forward Ersan Ilyasova. Ilyasova will limit Philadelphia’s opportunities to play two-center lineups – not that those appear fruitful. Plus, Embiid will get more minutes.

A defense-first interior player, Noel faces a tough fit. The 76ers just don’t have a roster that complements his skills after years of asset accumulation and tanking – which also likely grinds on him.

Noel said he’ll focus on what he can control, and I believe he’ll try. But it’s hard when the situation around him is so counter to his best interests.

Report: Age minimum still on table in Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 23:  The full draft board of the first 30 pics of the first round of the 2016 NBA Draft is seen at the Barclays Center on June 23, 2016 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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A new Collective Bargaining Agreement is expected to be finished soon, but with months until the current deal expires, both the owners and players can afford to take their time and get the details right.

Both sides reportedly agreed to keep the age minimum – which requires players to be 19 and one year removed from their high school class’ graduation – in place.

Or not?

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

Other issues, like the age limit for players entering the league, are still on the table. The league has long sought to increase the age limit from its current 19, and at least one year removed from one’s high school class, to at least 20 years of age. The union has talked about a “zero and two” setup, similar to that used by baseball — players can enter the Draft out of high school, but if they choose to go to college, they have to stay in college at least two years (in baseball, it’s three years) before declaring for the Draft.

The union wants to lower the age minimum. Adam Silver wants to raise it.

Most likely, the current one-and-done rule remains in place.

But a zero-or-two setup could be an interesting compromise. That would allow players certain they’re ready for the pros out of high school to declare for the NBA draft. In all other cases, Silver would get his wish.

Again, the status quo likely remains in tact. But it’s good both sides are discussing the issue to see whether there’s a better solution.

76ers increase Joel Embiid’s minute limit to 28

Philadelphia 76ers' Joel Embiid, left, tries to get around Cleveland Cavaliers' DeAndre Liggins, center, and Kevin Love during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
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Take comfort, chairs and staffers.

The 76ers have raised Joel Embiid‘s minute limit from 24 to 28.

Jessica Camerato of CSN Philly:

This was never a hard limit. Embiid played more than 24 minutes in five of his 12 games with a high of 27 in an overtime contest. Presumably, the new “limit” will also allow for Embiid to sometimes it.

Embiid’s numbers per 36 minutes are eye-popping: 28.6 points, 12.2 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 3.8 blocks and 6.4 turnovers. A small workload likely factors into his per-minute dominance, and he’s still a long way from typical starter minutes. But I’m interested to see how his production translates over a larger sample.

The 76ers, in their mission to be less bad this season, will also appreciate a few more minutes of Embiid. They defend like the NBA’s second-best defense with him on the floor and the league’s second-worst defense without him. They also score a little better with him. Overall, they get outscored by just 2.2 points per 100 possessions with him and a whopping 14.2 points per 100 possessions without him.

This could give Philadelphia a couple extra wins over the rest of the season. At minimum, it’ll make the 76ers more enjoyable to watch for a few more minutes each game.