As per usual, strange things are afoot in the voting for the All-Defensive teams

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Award voting will never be a perfect process, if only because there are so many different perspectives involved. That said, selections to the All-Defense first and second teams provide particularly unique challenges, as voters are not only asked to weigh certain contributions (scoring, playmaking, etc.) against others (defense, leadership, etc.) as they are in MVP voting for example, but determine whether the contributions are worthy of such an honor at all. It’s tough to dispute things like points and shooting percentages, but there aren’t any simple ways to measure defense, and finding any reliable way to measure defense quantitatively is rather difficult.

It’s so difficult, in fact, that for the most part, head coaches needn’t be bothered by it. The electorate for the All-Defense teams are supposed to be the league’s 30 head coaches, but does anyone honestly believe that Phil Jackson or Gregg Popovich penned the ballots for their respective teams? Such assignments are often handed down the ladder to an assistant, and perhaps even further down from that assistant to someone else on staff.

Want proof? Even the worst coach in the league wouldn’t dare vote for some of the players that end up receiving votes in these things. Here are some of this year’s anomalies:

  •  Luis Scola received the same amount of points (2) as Portland wing stopper Nicolas Batum.
  • Dwight Howard only received 28 votes for the 1st team, when he should have received 29. Stan Van Gundy (or whoever is voting for SVG) can’t vote for Howard as a rule, but is there honestly a coach in this league that thinks there is a better defensive player, much less a better defensive center, than Dwight?
  • Andrew Bogut, who would have been a fine selection for Defensive Player of the Year had Howard not been otherworldly, was only the fourth highest vote-getter among centers. Bogut was second in the league this season in combined steals, blocks, and drawn charges.
  • Shawn Marion held opposing small forward to a 13.3 PER this season (15 qualifies as average) and a league-low .392 from the field (per ESPN Dallas’ Tim MacMahon), but couldn’t score a single vote. Forwards who did receive a vote? The aforementioned Scola, Ersan Ilyasova, and Caron Butler. Speaking of Caron Butler, how did a player get a vote for playing roughly a season of decent defense? Butler wasn’t bad defensively for Dallas after the trade deadline, but with Washington? Yeesh.
  • Nick Collison also couldn’t get a single vote, despite being one of the more effective defenders in the league. Thought Marion holding opposing small forwards to a 13.3 PER was impressive? How about Collison keeping his opponents at power forward to just an 8.7 PER?
  • Jason Kidd receive four first team votes despite his inability to defend his own position on a regular basis, Lamar Odom and Deron Williams each received a first team vote despite being merely competent on D, and George Hill received a first team vote on the strength of some unknown criteria that places him as an elite defender.
  • Finally, something that’s less of an anomaly and more of a general trend. Eight of the ten All-Defense selections were All-Stars. This isn’t because those playing in the All-Star game are selected for their defense necessarily, but that despite the purpose of the All-Defense teams, the voting coaches typically choose more complete players. Guys like Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, who for all of their defensive strengths are rather limited on the offensive end, are routinely left out in the cold. It’s not a coincidence that the first season Gerald Wallace was named an All-Star is also the first year he was selected for either All-Defense team, and it’s also not indicative of some substantial leap in his game.

LaVar Ball calls out John Wall, Wizards; Marcin Gortat doesn’t think that was smart

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“I told him after the game, due to all the riffraff his dad brings he’s going to get a lot of people coming at him. He’s got to be ready for that, and I let him know after the game… (I had to) welcome his little young a** to the NBA.”

That was the Clippers’ Patrick Beverley after he tormented Lonzo Ball on opening night, and he speaks for a number of other players I have heard from who said father LaVar wrote checks that Lonzo is going to have to cash, and guys were going to go at him. Not every night, but enough.

Since that rough opener the rookie has had a decent couple of games — averaging 18.5 points, 11 assists, and eight rebounds a night, not efficient but playing better — going against Eric Bledsoe (a capable defender who had checked out mentally in Phoenix) and Jrue Holiday and the Pelicans. Wednesday night John Wall and the Wizards come to town, and that’s another level of competition.

My least favorite thing about this Lakers season is the way the L.A. media sticks a microphone in front of LaVar Ball after every game. I don’t care about LaVar, in the same way I don’t care about the Kardashians.

But what he said has become a thing. After the Lakers loss to the Pelicans LaVar said, “[The Wizards] better beware cause Lonzo ain’t losing again. Not in the same week!”

Wizards’ center Marcin Gortat thought that was funny.

First off, Lonzo is going to lose twice in a week a lot this season — the Lakers are not a good team.

Second, Wall is a top-five NBA point guard by any standard, an All-NBA player who is far more than just quick (although he is that, too). He can shoot, he’s an aggressive defender, and he knows how to set up teammates. He’s going to be more than a handful for Ball. To put it kindly.

Whatever happens Wednesday night (most likely Wall smokes Lonzo) we know one thing for sure: LaVar will say something outlandish. And it will become a thing. The game is secondary for that marketing effort.

Lakers to break out powder blue Minneapolis throwback uniforms this season

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The Lakers have gone a few different directions with alternate uniforms in recent years, such as the black version, but when you have a classic brand you shouldn’t mess with it. Same with the Celtics, Bulls, Sixers, and other classic uniforms — if you’re going to go alternate then go older.

The Lakers are doing just that — going back to Minneapolis.

They are breaking out the George Mikan era jerseys, starting on Wednesday vs. Wizards and in four other games later in the season.

I like it.

Now if the Lakers could get George Mikan in the paint it would help.

PBT Podcast: All things Sixers with Jessica Camerato of NBC Sports Philadelphia

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The Sixers have started the season 0-3, Joel Embiid is frustrated about his lack of post touches, and Markelle Fultz‘s shot has gone funky…

Relax. The Sixers are going to be fine, and they still very well could be a playoff team in the East this season. It’s just three games (against teams expected to finish above the Sixers in the standings anyway).

Jessica Camerato of NBC Sports Philadelphia joins Kurt Helin on the Podcast today to talk all things Sixers. They discuss the things that have gone wrong, but also the culture Brett Brown has built, why the Sixers still have to be thought of as a playoff team, and why the future is bright. Also, there is a little discussion of the mess with the Phoenix Suns, their lack of a process, and how Eric Bledsoe could tilt things in the East.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, or listen and subscribe via iTunes (just click the button under the podcast), subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

Stephen Curry fined $50,000 for throwing mouthpiece

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Stephen Curry knew a fine was coming, the only question was how much? The NBA had established this precedent before: When Curry (or any player) threw his mouthpiece he got fined. That he’s done it before and threw it in the direction of an official this time meant the price could go up.

It did — Curry was slapped with a $50,000 fine for throwing his mouthpiece during the ejection from Saturday night’s Warriors loss to the Grizzlies. Curry felt he was fouled on a drive and didn’t get the call, and he lost his cool.

Andre Iguodala was also fined $15,000 for “verbally abusing a game official” during the same incident.

Some fans wanted a suspension for Curry, mostly because it’s trendy to hate on Curry and the Warriors in some circles. Reality is there is a precedent here, and the league office stuck with that. Now, if the mouthpiece had struck the official, Curry would have gotten a suspension. If you want to argue the intent was the same, call up the league. They make the distinction.