Greg Oden is about as much of a Blazer as you are at this point

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Hey, remember when Greg Oden was the fun-loving, big-hearted savior of the Blazers who would push them over the top?

Yeah, those were fun days.

Blazers Edge posted an interview 95.5FM in Portland did with the young behemoth prior to Game 6 versus the Suns, and instead of the usual chipperness and easy to swallow answers, well…things were pretty weird.

For starters, Oden hasn’t been around the team. At all. He’s been at home, resting at his mom’s house.Okay, no big deal. Understandable, dude needs to concentrate on rehabbing and no place better to recuperate than Momma’s. Besides, they say that sitting on the bench is hard on his knee.

But he’s probably been on the phone, talking with the team, encouraging them, telling them what he sees, right? From BE:

“I haven’t really talked to anybody. But, you know, I can kind of guess.
 They’re trying to figure out what’s going on. We’re playing good one
day and play bad the next day. I just think they’re going to try to
worry about that and figure that out.”

Oooookay. Well, hey, he’s a young guy. And there are some new guys on the team. Well, one new guy. What’s he going to say, really? That’s understandable, I guess. The good news is, he’s at least been off long enough that he’s starting to feel the knee respond, right?

“I don’t have no discomfort or soreness, I don’t even see that much
swelling actually. So the big thing now is just worrying about
everything around it and getting me to trust my knee again. Sometimes I
still go up the stairs one-legged. I just gotta trust it and get the
other parts of my leg stronger and it will be feeling a lot better.”

So, you don’t trust the leg. That you walk on. That you need, to play basketball. In five months. Right. Dwight Jaynes mentions how odd all of this is on his blog. 

Blazer fans in the comments are predictably defensive of the big guy. He’s had a hard time, and really, they need, NEED him to pan out. Because while Oden is eating cheerios at his mom’s house, the guy they could have picked is pushing the Lakers as far as a young team like the Thunder can, and shouldering much of the load. The long-term is what you’ll hear the Blazers and their fans talk about with Oden. The only problem is we’re now three years into the Oden Era and he’s played 82 games. The long-term is rapidly approaching.

Let’s all hope all the reasons to doubt Oden end up being nothing more than scares and not foreboding signs.

Assistant coach: Kevin Durant ‘jealous’ of Kyle Lowry-DeMar DeRozan relationship

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 08: Kevin Durant #5, Kyle Lowry #7 and Demar DeRozan #9 of United States celebrate as Jhon Cox #6 of Venezuela  looks on during the Men's Priliminary Round between the United States and Venezuela on Day 3 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Carioca Arena 1 on August 8, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
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Anything positive Kevin Durant says about the Warriors is interpreted as an insult to Russell Westbrook and the Thunder.

So, Durant has gone out of his way to praise Oklahoma City lately.

But he can’t control the messaging of Rex Kalamian, a Raptors assistant coach who previously worked for the Thunder.

Kalamian relayed a text from Durant about his experience playing with Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan on Team USA in the Olympics.

Chris O’Leary of the Toronto Star:

“Your two guys are the best. I’m jealous of their relationship, the way they get along with each other and the way they play together. The way they enjoy each other, it’s great,” Kalamian said of that text on Monday, as the Raptors finished up their practice. Durant, all the way from the Olympics in Rio, was in awe of the friendship that Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan had on display with the U.S. men’s basketball team.

“I think it’s kind of what he wants,” Kalamian continued. “He wants that bond with someone . . . and I think he’s going to find that.

“Early on in OKC, we had that.”

“We had that (bond) really with James Harden. He was a connector of everyone. He brought Westbrook, Durant and (Serge) Ibaka and they all kind of connected, they all came together,” Kalamian said.

“James is a big reason and when he left I think Kevin said . . . that trade was the beginning of the end for him and now there wasn’t that connection as much.

“Kevin and Russell, they respect the heck out of each other, no question about it. They played well together, they work well together, they communicate, but I think the connection was lost a little bit for whatever reason.”

This will absolutely be interpreted as shot at Westbrook, and that’s not fair. Lowry and DeRozan share a quirky, trusting and sincere friendship. Even with deep bonds with their current coworkers, who wouldn’t be jealous of that?

Now, there are real signs of fray between Durant and Westbrook. Even if Durant’s text doesn’t necessarily implicitly refer to Westbrook, it might.

Maybe losing James Harden caused problems between Durant and Westbrook. Beyond his ability to – as Kalamian put it – connect, Harden also made the Thunder better. Winning cures all ills.

Durant will win plenty with the Warriors. That will smooth any rough edges in his friendships with Draymond Green, Stephen Curry, Andre Iguodala and everyone else.

But even if Durant has all his dreams come true in Golden State, he can remain jealous of Lowry and DeRozan. Their connection seems special.

Warriors embrace villainy in hilarious cartoon (video)

OAKLAND, CA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Kevin Durant #35 and Stephen Curry #30 of the Golden State Warriors joke around while they pose for NBA team photographer Noah Graham during the Golden State Warriors Media Day at the Warriors Practice Facility on September 26, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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I find most of these corny, but “Super Team: A Warriors Musical” is fantastic.

Obviously, Draymond Green‘s character provides plenty of comedy. But the entire roster – from Stephen Curry to Kevin Durant to even Ian Clark – is used in the gags.

The breakout stars: Klay Thompson and Rocco.

Well done, Bleacher Report:

D-League implements three experimental rules

CLEVELAND, OH - MAY 24:  Referees review a play prior to ejecting Al Horford #15 of the Atlanta Hawks from the game for a flagrant foul in the second quarter against the Cleveland Cavaliers during Game Three of the Eastern Conference Finals of the 2015 NBA Playoffs at Quicken Loans Arena on May 24, 2015 in Cleveland, Ohio. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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None of these are as dramatic as the international goaltending rule, but the NBA continues to wisely use the D-League for rule experimentation.

The new rules for this year:

  • Each team will be entitled to a “Reset Timeout” in the final two minutes of the fourth quarter and final two minutes of any overtime period.  “Reset Timeouts” do not allow teams to huddle, but otherwise mirror standard timeouts, allowing teams to advance the ball (when applicable) and make unlimited substitutions.  If either team huddles or prevents the ball from immediately being put back into play, it will result in a delay of game being issued to the offending team.  The “Reset Timeout” replaces the “Advance Rule” which had been used in the NBA D-League the past two seasons.


  • The 24-second clock will reset to 14 seconds after an offensive rebound or when the offensive team otherwise is the first team to retain possession after the ball contacts the rim.


  • A 75-second limit on the duration of instant replay reviews has been implemented, except in circumstances where the review is for a hostile act or altercation, could lead to an ejection, there is a technical equipment problem or other atypical circumstances.

Hornets coach Steve Clifford pitched the “Reset Timeout.” I like it.

I’m pretty ambivalent on a 14-second reset after an offensive rebound. But why 14 seconds? If eight seconds are allotted to bring the ball up court, shouldn’t it reset to 16 seconds? It seems this is a continuation of a rule created when teams had 10 seconds to bring the ball upcourt.

I dislike the hard replay time limit. Replays should generally be faster, but if it occasionally requires more time to get the right call, so what? Those first 75 seconds are a sunk cost.

Rumor: Kentavious Caldwell-Pope demanding more than $20 million annually to sign contract extension with Pistons

ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 27:  Kentavious Caldwell-Pope #5 of the Detroit Pistons reacts after a basket against the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena on October 27, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.  NOTE TO USER User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading andor using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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Pistons owner Tom Gores said he’d pay the luxury tax if a contract extension for Kentavious Caldwell-Pope put Detroit over next season.

Yet, Caldwell-Pope hasn’t signed an extension with the deadline six days away.

What will it take?

Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

There was gossip over the summer that it would take a deal worth north of $20 million per year to get Caldwell-Pope’s signature.

That’s not an unreasonable demand. It’s up to Caldwell-Pope whether he’d accept less in exchange for more security, but I think he’d get even more as a restricted free agent next summer – maybe even a max contract, which projects to start at more than $24 million.

Caldwell-Pope is a good shooting guard in a league with a dearth of quality wings and a greater need for them as teams go smaller. He’ll be just 24 next offseason, so his next deal should last through his prime.

His preseason didn’t foreshadow a breakout year. He remains a good defender and streaky 3-point shooter. But it’s possible Caldwell-Pope steadies his outside stroke and/or becomes an even more impactful defender. He could also improve his off-the-dribble skills, though his bread is buttered as a 3-and-D player.

Still, it won’t take massive improvements for Caldwell-Pope to hold value. To some degree, the Pistons could view every dollar under the max on a Caldwell-Pope extension as savings.

If his demands remain high, the Pistons could always take another year to evaluate the fourth-year guard. With matching rights, they can always re-sign him in the offseason.