NBA Playoffs: Nene's injury should be the final straw for Denver

Leave a comment

The irony of Nene’s potentially season-ending knee injury is unmistakable: Carmelo Anthony asked for help from his teammates, and fate responded by taking one away. It’s pretty horrible news for a Denver team just now starting to pull things together offensively (and for a talented player like Nene who has been around this block once or twice), especially considering the team’s rotation alternatives. The Nuggets will be forced to rely on Chris Andersen and Johan Petro to hold down the middle on defense and provide some scoring, neither of which seems a particularly likely result.

Then again, stranger things have happened in this series. After the Jazz lost Mehmet Okur for the season (and much more) due to a ruptured Achilles tendon, they appeared to be paper-thin in the middle. The unpolished Kyrylo Fesenko was deemed Okur’s replacement in the starting lineup, and it was assumed that Utah’s season was well on its way toward an unfortunate conclusion. The Jazz had already survived an injury to Andrei Kirilenko to keep things competitive early in the series, and the loss of the one proven center on the roster looked to be too big of a setback for Utah to overcome.

That obviously hasn’t been the case. The Jazz didn’t miss a beat with Okur sidelined, and Fesenko turned out to be far more competent than anyone imagined. He’s not contributing a ton in the box score, but Fes is giving Utah quality minutes in a jam, which is well more than most expected of him.

The same result is technically a possibility for the Nuggets, and hell, maybe Petro will have a game to remember on Friday. It’s just not very likely. Denver still hasn’t figured out how to stop Utah’s offense, and replacing a capable defender — at least in theory — like Nene with a block-chaser like Chris Andersen and a Johan Petro like Johan Petro doesn’t bode well for the Nuggets’ ability to stop anyone.

It’s not that Fesenko is in any way a superior player to Andersen or even Petro, for that matter. Denver just doesn’t have any time or possessions to spare. Every second of basketball the Nuggets play in this series will be laced with the threat of elimination. A few more missteps and that’s all for Denver, which puts the Nuggets’ bigs in a particularly tough situation.

Last night’s win does offer some hope for the Nuggets, if only because productive scoring nights from Chauncey Billups (21 points), Kenyon Martin (18), J.R. Smith (17), and Arron Afflalo (12) proved that if nothing else, Denver can still outscore Utah on some nights. Chris Andersen even played a fine game (10 points, seven rebounds)  in Nene’s absence. But the series precedent tells us that those are exceptions to the standard. Those are notable performances because of each of those players has struggled (relatively) in this series, and it took all of them clicking offensively to secure a must-win affair.

To expect the same over the final game(s) of the series is to ignore the significance of the first four contests, which showcased the brilliance of Deron Williams and Utah’s ability to execute above all else. Combine those series-long trends with Nene’s unfortunate injury, and and Game 5 seems to be a brief respite from Denver’s turmoil rather than the beginning of their salvation. 

Report: John Wall contract extension Wizards’ top priority, but he’s unsure about committing

Daniel Shirey/Getty Images
1 Comment

Wizards guard John Wall can sign a contract extension this year, sign an extension next year or become an unrestricted free agent in 2019. No matter when he signs – because he’s still under contract for two more seasons – the new terms would take effect in 2019-20.

When will he lock in?

By making the All-NBA third team, Wall became eligible to sign a designated-veteran-player contract extension with Washington this summer. But because he has two years left on his current deal ($18,063,850 in 2017-18 and $19,169,800 in 2018-19), an extension could add just four years to his contract.

This is the only time Wall is guaranteed be eligible for a designated-veteran-player salary, though. He could add five years at the designated-veteran-player rate by making All-NBA in 2017-18 or 2018-19, but that’s obviously no guarantee.

Does Wall want to sign now, even for fewer years, while he’s designated-veteran-player eligible? Do the Wizards want to give him that higher max in order to secure his services for just four additional years?

J. Michael of CSN Mid-Atlantic:

An extension with Wall will be the top priority of the offseason in which Otto Porter is also a restricted free agent, league sources tell CSNmidatlantic.com.

From league sources close to the situation, Wall wants to see a bigger picture plan on where the franchise is headed before committing for longer.

Wall has never advanced past the second round, and he sounded disappointed in his supporting cast after the Wizards lost to the Celtics in this year’s second round. He has also expressed unhappiness about his lack of popularity in Washington.

But that’s a lot of money to turn down. Wall can’t simply pencil himself onto another All-NBA team is this guard-dominant league.

A designated-veteran-player projects to be worth $217 million over five years. If Wall plays out his contract without making an All-NBA team the next two years, his projected max – even if he re-signs with the Wizards – projects be worth $186 million over five years. That’s a $31 million difference!*

*Using Albert Nahmad’s $107 million salary-cap projection for 2019-20

Would Wall take such a large financial risk?

He must weigh his priorities (security vs. flexibility, staying in Washington vs. leaving) and his chances of making another All-NBA team in a league with Stephen Curry, James Harden, Russell Westbrook, Isaiah Thomas, DeMar DeRozan, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Jimmy Butler, Chris Paul, Kyrie Irving, Damian Lillard, Kyle Lowry, Klay Thompson and Kemba Walker.

Here’s a flowchart showing Wall’s possible outcomes and what his max contract projects to be in each scenario:

John Wall extension (4)

Report: Paul Millsap opts out of Hawks contract

Rob Carr/Getty Images
2 Comments

Even after the Hawks’ season ended, Paul Millsap wouldn’t confirm he’d opt out of the final year of his contract.

But the All-Star finally made the inevitable official.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

Atlanta Hawks All-Star forward Paul Millsap has opted out of his $21.4 million contract for next season to become a free agent, league sources told The Vertical.

The 32-year-old Millsap would have earned $21,472,407 if he opted in. It’s a virtual certainty he’ll earn more than that next season – and gain long-term security in a multi-year contract.

He might even get a max starting salary, which projects to be worth more than $35 million. Over a five-year contract with Atlanta, his max projects to be worth $205 million ($41 million annually). If he leaves, his projected max is $152 million over four years ($38 million annually).

The Hawks don’t yet have a general manager, but Millsap will reportedly negotiate directly with owner Tony Ressler, who said they’d make “every effort imaginable” to re-sign Millsap.

With that commitment and certain interest from other teams, how could Millsap do anything but opt out?

This isn’t a tell about his future with Atlanta. It’s an obvious financial decision.

Called out by LeBron James, reporter Kenny Roda defends himself

2 Comments

LeBron James reacted to the Cavaliers’ Game 3 loss to the Celtics by jawing with a fan and saying he was glad Cleveland lost.

The peculiarities didn’t end there.

LeBron called out Kenny Roda of WHBC for asking a question.

For full context, the earlier times LeBron addressed his individual performance and both of Roda’s questions are included in the above video. So is the funny look LeBron shot someone (Roda?) after the press conference. Here’s the noteworthy exchange:

  • Roda: “For you, you said it was just your game. Couldn’t get into a rhythm tonight, is that what it was? Based on their defense or just not feeling it or or what?”
  • LeBron: “Nah, I was just pretty poor. I mean, what do you want me to say? It sees like you only ask questions when we lose. It’s a weird thing with you, Kenny. You always come around when we lose, I swear. Yeah, OK.”

Roda:

“You cover us only when we lose” is a too-common complaint in high school sports. It’s odd to see LeBron employ it, though saying Roda asks questions only when the Cavs lose is a wrinkle that adds plausibility to LeBron’s claim. Still, it’s tough to believe.

Even if LeBron is right that Roda asks questions only when Cleveland loses, so what? Asking a question isn’t a sign Roda is happy the team lost or is trying to rub it in. Players tend to be testier after losses (case in point), and asking question then can be more difficult. If Roda puts himself out there after only losses, kudos to him.

LeBron’s struggles were the dominant storyline in Game 3. Getting him to expand on what went wrong was a worthy goal. Roda’s question probably wasn’t distinctive enough to get more out of LeBron after his first two responses about his performance, but the inquiry was on the right path. Asking a vague question on a topic already covered vaguely is only a minor offense.

LeBron understands the media better than most. This was a weird time to pick a public battle, which makes me think this was more frustration than ploy.

Stephen Curry: Dewayne Dedmon’s screen was ‘dirty play’ (video)

4 Comments

Late in the Warriors’ Game 3 win over the Spurs on Saturday, San Antonio center Dewayne Dedmon appeared to initiate knee-to-knee contact on a screen of Stephen Curry.

Curry, via Chris Haynes of ESPN:

“I know he’s not a dirty player. I’m not going to try to mess up his reputation, but I feel like that was a dirty play,” Curry responded to ESPN. “Luckily no one was hurt.”

Golden State is clearly trying to gain equal footing in the dirty debate after Zaza Pachulia injured Kawhi Leonard – and gain the moral high ground by not calling a player dirty and bringing the consequences that invites.

But this isn’t the same as Pachulia’s double-slide closeout under a fading shooter.

It’s much easier to assign intent when watching in slow motion. Innocuous actions tend to look deliberate when viewed at partial speed, because we subconsciously believe players process their movements at the same rate we process their movements – but slow motion gives us an advantage.

Dedmon’s screen was probably illegal, but dirty? I’m not sure. I don’t know his intent, but executing that move intending to injure Curry would require incredible precision. Maybe Dedmon tries that often, usually misses and just happened to strike here. But I don’t see enough to assume this was a dirty play