NBA Playoffs: Lakers, Thunder game 5: It's all about the jump shot. And making one.

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durant_Gasol.jpgThere’s been a lot of focus about the Los Angeles Lakers inability to hit a jump shot in this series. With reason — the Lakers shot 26.1 percent (12 of 46) from beyond 10 feet in that game (thank you Hoopdata!). For the series, the Lakers are shooting an unimpressive 35 percent from beyond 10 feet from the basket.

But the Thunder are worse — 33.3 percent. They also are not a good jump shooting team, you just haven’t noticed it because in the two games in Oklahoma City they got 61 shots at the rim. They are running, they are driving, they were getting the easy buckets that fuel their offense. In their game two loss, the Thunder had 16 shots at the rim, in the game three win it was 31.

All that leads us to the pivotal game five tonight at Staples Center — the team that makes the other team a bunch of jump shooters from the outside is going to win this game. That, or someone is going to have to start hitting those shots.

Don’t bet on hitting the shots, because individuasl on both teams are struggling  — Jeff Green was to be somewhat respected from three in the regular season, but is at 23 percent in the playoffs. To borrow a line from the late, great Chick Hearn: Ron Artest couldn’t throw a pea in the ocean (13 percent from three this series).

For the Thunder, they just have to do what they have been doing at home. They have packed the paint and made it hard to get the ball to the Laker big men Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum. Their length has given LA some problems inside (but not that much, when they do shoot the percentage is pretty high). They have made the Lakers jumpshooters, and they blew them out.

But for the Lakers this is a team thing — they have to shut off the Oklahoma City fast break (make some shots, get back on defense). They have to shut off Russell Westbrook, who has been carving up the Lakers like roast beef at a Hilton Sunday brunch. That means better play from the Lakers guards guiding him to help, it means better rotations and help from the bigs. In today’s no-touch-on-the-perimeter NBA, defending quick guards is a team effort.

While it’s not set in stone, let’s be honest — winner of this game wins the series. The winner of this game will be the team that executes better on defense. They both have done it during the regular season (both top 10 defenses in the league), but we’ll see who can execute it under pressure. Before the series everyone assumed that would be the Lakers. Nobody smart assumes that now.

Tyronn Lue says ‘they said’ LeBron James has a body of a 19-year-old, but nobody else knows where Cavaliers coach got that

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LeBron James might be the greatest athlete in NBA history.

But even he has shown signs of decline at age 31.

He has gotten multiple back injections and even took a break during the season to rehabilitate in Miami. The forward has treated the last two regular-seasons as glorified warmups for the playoffs.

Just where does LeBron stand physically?

Cavaliers coach Tyronn Lue gave quite the answer.

Joe Vardon of

Lue said James, at 31, “had a chance to get tested this summer and they said he had a body of a 19-year old. Maybe he’s getting younger. Benjamin Button.”

It was a little perplexing because neither James, nor his personal trainer, Mike Mancias, nor general manager David Griffin had any real idea what test Lue was talking about.

This reminds me of Derrick Rose attributing the Knicks and Warriors being super teams to “They’re saying.” Who is they, and what are they smoking?

That LeBron, Mancias and Griffin won’t cop to knowing is quite revealing.

LeBron does not have the body of a 19-year-old. Years of other-worldly play and long playoff runs has taken a toll.

Because he’s declining from such a high peak, LeBron should remain elite for a while. His athleticism might even fluctuate as it trends downward overall.

But Father Time is undefeated, and LeBron didn’t just get a mid-career reset to his rookie physical form.

Draymond Green says technical foul won’t dissuade him from yelling after dunks

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Draymond Green has apologized again and again and again in the last year.

But the Warriors forward has also maintained he must remain true to himself.

So, after getting technical foul for yelling (presumably because it was toward LaMarcus Aldridge) following a dunk in Golden State’s loss to the Spurs last night, Green – under more intense scrutiny than ever – dug in.

Green, via Monte Poole of CSN Bay Area:

“Next time I dunk, I’m gonna yell again,” Draymond declared after the loss. “I mean, it’s kind of universal. I’m gonna continue to be me, and whatever happens, happens.”

Expect Green to keep getting technicals. Even if the one last night was relatively weak, Green nearly constantly toes the line. He had 12 technical fouls last season, and a league-high five in the playoffs (boosted by Golden State advancing all the way to Game 7 of the NBA Finals).

And if the Warriors are winning, that’s fine. His emotional energy does more to lift the team than hinder it.

But, as we’ve seen, there is a definite downside.

Report: Hawks signing Dennis Schroder to four-year, $70 million contract extension

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 26:  Dennis Schroder #17 of the Atlanta Hawks poses during media day on September 26, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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Update: Marc Stein of ESPN:

That’s an even better deal for the Hawks.


The Hawks traded a former All-Star in his prime (Jeff Teague). They waived two experienced backups (Jarrett Jack and Will Bynum), leaving only rookie Malcolm in Delaney in reserve.

Atlanta is putting all its point guard eggs in Dennis Schroder‘s basket – not just as the starter on a team that expects to make the playoffs, but a long-term building block.

Marc Stein of ESPN:

Paying Schroder $17.5 million per year seems fair, because he could wind up drastically underpaid or drastically overpaid.

Schroder drives into the lane with abandon and usually produces quality outcomes as a result. He possesses impressive tools and is already beginning to utilize them, including in several clutch situations.

But he must make better decisions with the ball, finish better at the rim and shoot better from outside for Atlanta’s bet to pay off. It’s also help if he becomes more than just an occasionally pesky defender.

Just 23, time is on his side.

If Schroder develops into a quality starting point guard, he’ll be a bargain. The Hawks will have done well to lock him up before he proved his ability, and their other moves indicate they believe in him making this step.

But if a larger role just exposes Schroder’s flaws, this could backfire. For all the justifiable reasons to have faith in Schroder’s ascension, it’s important to remember he’s not there yet.

This is a relative high-variance bet by Atlanta, which I like in principle. Teams are generally too conservative with rookie-scale contract extensions.

If Schroder doesn’t break out as they hope, the Hawks will have problems regardless of whether or not they extend him. It’s not as if handling him restricted free agency would be a walk in the park.

Now, if Schroder lives up to the hype in Atlanta, the Hawks’ return on investment will be even greater.

Steven Adams spent NBA opening night watching Anime

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK - MAY 28:  Steven Adams #12 of the Oklahoma City Thunder looks on during the first half against the Golden State Warriors in game six of the Western Conference Finals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 28, 2016 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Last night you were likely watching the Cavaliers destroy the Knicks, then flipping over to watch the Indians and Cubs. It was a great sports night (especially if you live in Cleveland).

That’s not what Steven Adams was doing, he was watching Anime. Which probably had a lot more drama than either of the NBA games last night. Via Fred Katz of the Norman Transcript.

You have to love Adams.

One Piece is… like I know. From Wikipedia:

One Piece follows the adventures of Monkey D. Luffy, a young man whose body gained the properties of rubber after unintentionally eating a Devil Fruit. With his diverse crew of pirates, named the Straw Hat Pirates, Luffy explores the Grand Line in search of the world’s ultimate treasure known as “One Piece” in order to become the next King of the Pirates.

Insert your own joke about that being better than watching the Knicks offense (or the Warriors’ defense) here.

Adams will be more focused on basketball Wednesday night when OKC opens the season in Philadelphia. Joel Embiid will keep his mind on the game.