NBA Playoffs Celtics Heat: Anatomy of a heart-breaker

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Dwyane Wade talked to his hand and destroyed the Celtics to get the Heat a game in Miami. But most people consider this series to have ended when Paul Pierce stuck the dagger in in Game 3. It was a maelstrom of both the Celtics’ excellence and the Heat’s failure to execute. The Heat watched as one of the best clutch performers in the game drove in an isolation set, having a foul to give, and a help-defenders in range. They then watched as Pierce drove to his favorite spot on the floor, the elbow, jab-stepped-back and drained the game winner. 3-0, Celtics.

If anyone can lead a team back from 0-3, it’s Dwyane Wade. But that shot was pretty devastating for the Heat and also showed that the Celtics can still execute in those big-time playoff situations. And that Paul Pierce is still the Truth. Here’s how it broke down.

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Overloading the near-side with Allen and Garnett is a risky but productive decision. While you’re compacting defenders, you’re also creating more space for Pierce to work. If he has to pass, they’ll need a quick shot anyway, so the cross court pass isn’t really feasible. Miami for its part is playing “standard” situational defense, looking to deny penetration while also sticking to shooters. The proximity they have to the shooters will slowly erode as this play goes on.

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To be fair to Beasley, he’s got to maintain position between the roll-man and the basket. It’s hindsight to say he should have denied the pass, but even a momentary hedge might have cost the Celtics another second. And “biggest C on the floor” is obviously sarcasm, as it’s Michael Finley out there, shedding Wright.

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It’s at this point everyone watching at home can see the car wreck before it happens and yet they are all helpless to stop it. You know where Pierce is going but you can’t stop him from going there. This is where the Celtics take a disadvantage in the overload into an advantage.

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Haslem now has to keep position in case they swing the ball to Allen and his man can’t clear the screen. He’s also got to maintain proximity to Garnett to prevent the mid-range jumper. And in trying to maintain these two responsibilities, man-help on Pierce becomes less and less feasible.

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And yet there’s hope. The Heat still have a foul to give, with 5.4 seconds left. Haslem is right there to provide help, but he’s still a little shallow. There’s good spacing all over. This is the last time things are going right for Miami on the final possession.

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With 1.5 left, Ray Allen’s not even ready to receive a pass. The rest of the Celtics know what’s coming. The Heat, somehow, do not. Haslem has backed off instead of pulling to the danger zone. Dorell Wright can just literally reach out, foul Pierce, and force a reset with a little over a second remaining. If Haslem flashes, Pierce has to adjust and dish to Garnett for an 18 footer. Still a pretty good shot, but not an in-rhythm ISO from the elbow for a big-time player at his favorite spot.Instead, Haslem’s concerned about the drive.

Pierce meanwhile engages in the mid-drive jab-step, feigning inside while dragging his right foot back for the pull-up. This game is over and the Heat don’t even know it.

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Wright can’t be blamed here. He kept good spacing at the top of the key, hung with him, dropped back to not pick up a blocking foul when Pierce feigned inside, and leaps to contest right as Pierce is pulling up. He’s literally milliseconds late. And that’s all Pierce needs.

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Look how close Wright is there. He’s jumping from further away, trying to extend, and it’s just not enough. It’s enough to make it a tough shot for Pierce, but that’s what Pierce thrives on. He’s in the outside corner of the danger zone, and that’s all she wrote.

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How do you like “The Process” now? Sixers eliminate Heat, advance to second round

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It felt inevitable.

Not “The Process” from the start. There were some severe downs before the ups.

Not this first playoff series against Miami from the start, because it felt even… until Game 3 when Joel Embiid returned in his mask and tipped the scales.

No, it was Game 5’s result felt inevitable as it unfolded. Not because Philadelphia won the previous game in Miami and could close it out at home. Not because the Sixers have the two biggest talents in the series in Ben Simmons and Embiid.

Rather, Game 5 felt inevitable because the Sixers got better looks all night long. They got them with ball movement, with player movement that created mismatches or clean jumpers. It was tied 46-46 at the half because Philadelphia just missing its good looks while the Heat were struggling with hands in their face all night. Philadelphia shot 38.1 percent in the first half overall and were 2-of-12 from three.

In the third quarter, it all changed.

Philadelphia went on an early 9-0 run, shot 50 percent as a team for the quarter, all while continuing to play defense and get stops. The Sixers won the third 34-20 and held on through Miami rallies in the fourth to take the game comfortably, 104-91.

With the win, Philadelphia wins the series 4-1 and advances to the second round, where they will face either Boston or Milwaukee (Boston leads the series 3-2).

They did it behind 27 from J.J. Redick, who knocked down five threes. Embiid had 19 points and 12 rebounds, Simmons had 14 points, 10 rebounds, and six assists. However, it was the defense that held the Miami to 38.6 percent shooting overall and 16-of-31 from three within eight feet of the basket that won the game for Philly.

This young Sixers team learned lessons in this first round, and maybe the biggest was how to adapt the physicality of the playoffs, and keeping your cool while things don’t go your way.

“I thought we withstood the physicality of the Heat,” Sixers coach Brett Brown said. “They’re a great organization. They came to mean it, we knew they wouldn’t go away easily, and we had to have that physical element to match.”

They matched that physicality, but what they had was talent that could step up.

They also savored the moment. Midway through the fourth, up comfortably and still knocking down shots, the young Sixers were reveling in the deafening crowd in the Wells Fargo Center. Philadelphia was reveling in success after years of struggling through the process — the players and fans wanted to start that party midway through the fourth.

However, Heat have no chill and no quit in them, they went on a 10-0 in the fourth quarter, not-so-coincidentally after Sixers fans started chanting, “We want Boston!”

But when it mattered the Heat couldn’t get stops — the Sixers talent showed through. Redick hit threes. Embiid owned the paint. Simmons did a little bit of everything.

It was a moment of revelry in Philadelphia. One years in the making — and maybe the first in many years of future celebrations on that court.

Sixers players douse Brett Brown, present him with bell after closing Heat (VIDEO)

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The Philadelphia 76ers are moving on. Let’s just try to process that for a moment.

After beating the Miami Heat on Tuesday night, 104-91, this iteration of the Sixers experienced their first playoff series win together. It was also the first series win for coach Brett Brown as the man in charge of an NBA team.

As such, players gathered in the locker room after the win to hear Brown speak about the win, and about how the team had more to give and to learn as they moved forward together in the playoffs.

When Brown concluded his speech, he tried to hand off the victory bell to JJ Redick. As soon as Redick received it, he bestowed the honor of the bell right back upon Brown.

That’s when teammates showered Brown with whatever they had nearby, and Brown rung the bell.

Man, what a moment.

Marcus Smart returns, helps Celtics win Game 5 over Bucks

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Marcus Smart returned to the Boston Celtics after suffering a thumb injury earlier in the year, and boy was it just in time.

The Celtics guard came off the bench, doing what he does best: attacking opposing guards, grabbing rebounds, and making hustle plays for his squad. Smart thoroughly annoyed the Milwaukee Bucks, and as Giannis Antetokounmpo failed to make a push in the second half (and as Khris Middleton‘s shooting slowly deteriorated) it was Boston who came out with a win in Game 5, 92-87.

Milwaukee’s offense failed to show up early. According to NBA TV, it was the second-lowest halftime total for the Bucks this season, and the away team scored just 37 points at the break. Milwaukee struggled mightily as a team, shooting just 21 percent from 3-point range. Despite the issues, both Antetokounmpo and Middleton had 11 points by half.

Boston’s attack was balanced, with nine players scoring in the first half but none reaching double figures. Smart was effective off the bench, playing 12 minutes in the first half. Smart’s presence was felt elsewhere on the floor as well; in those minutes he racked up two blocks, two rebounds, and two assists.

The Celtics stalled to start the third quarter, at times going several minutes between baskets. The intensity level was still high, particularly during one tussle with 9:33 left in the third. Eric Bledsoe and Terry Rozier got into a bumping match on the baseline away from the ball, resulting in one player getting pushed into an official. Bledsoe earned a Flagrant 1 for his efforts, and Rozier was assessed a technical.

Milwaukee began to battle back on surprising baskets by Shabazz Muhammad. The former Minnesota Timberwolves wing dropped two 3-pointers to help the Bucks make a run at the Celtics all the way into the fourth quarter.

The critical play of the game came with 80 seconds left. With the shot clock winding down, Al Horford was allowed by officials to shoot a long jumper. The refereeing crew didn’t blow the whistle, and Boston took a second possession after a backtip.

Then, with 28 seconds left as the Bucks were trying to steal or foul the Celtics, came the play Boston fans had been waiting for from Smart. At first it appeared Milwaukee had shot at a turnover as they hustled Smart to the floor on a trap. Thinking quickly, Smart leapt on the lost ball, flipped over, and sent a pass to a wide open Horford for the basket, all but sealing the game.

Milwaukee tried to play the foul game in the final minute or so, but weren’t able to come up with a win. Antetokounmpo finished with just 16 points and Middleton with 23. Horford led the Celtics with 22 points, 14 rebounds, and three assists.

Boston now leads the series, 3-2, as they head back to Milwaukee for Game 6 on Thursday.

Meek Mill gets out of jail, takes helicopter to 76ers-Heat, rings bell pregame

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Philadelphia 76ers big man Joel Embiid had been one of the most notable NBA players leading the charge for the #FreeMeekMill movement. The rapper Meek Mill, a Philadelphia native and Sixers fan, has been incarcerated for violating the terms of his probation multiple times.

At the heart of the movement to free Meek Mill is the idea of comparative justice, that he has been unfairly targeted because of his race as an absorber of punishment from the penal system despite it being a decade since he committed his crime. People from Embiid to New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft have made their voices heard on the subject.

Today, Meek Mill was released from prison and was sent a special gift: the opportunity to fly via helicopter, provided by 76ers minority owner Michael Rubin, to Game 5 between the Sixers and Miami Heat.

When he arrived at the game, the rapper rung the ceremonial bell before tip-off.

Not a couple of hours fresh out of the joint.