NCAA finds more ways to make things hard on student athletes


I get it. I understand that there are more than 300,000 NCAA athletes and most of them will be going pro in some field other than their sport.

But this organization — in its quixotic quest to keep college athletics “pure” — just finds ways to make things harder on the students it is supposed to help. Especially that handful that might go pro. Take, for example, it’s new restrictions on players thinking about declaring for the NCAA Draft. We’ll let agent Arn Tellem explain from his Huffington Post column.

Before now, players had about a two-month window in which to withdraw from the draft, return to school and retain their NCAA eligibility. This year international players can bow out until June 14, the NBA deadline. But the NCAA has shortened the cut-off date for U.S. underclassmen to May 8. Since the deadline to declare for the draft is April 25, college players have less than two weeks to be evaluated by pro teams.

Make that a week and a half. The list of draft-eligible candidates is released April 29, the date on which underclassmen may start workouts with NBA teams. Effectively, this means that underclassmen have only 10 days to audition with teams and decide whether to stay in school or enter the NBA draft and forfeit their eligibility.

Ten days is a pretty short time to make what may be the most important decision of a student’s life. On top of that, the NCAA will not permit a student-athlete to skip class for a pro tryout. (The penalty: loss of eligibility). So, in the end, all these undergrads have is one weekend to map out their future. Does anyone seriously think that two days are sufficient? I’ve got a pretty good hunch that many players will declare for the draft in the belief that they’re first-round caliber, players who — had they be given more time to weigh their options — would have stayed in school.

So the NCAA is good with expanding the NCAA Tournament to 96 teams — meaning many more students will have to miss more classes for games that put money in the pockets of the NCAA and its member institutions — but the elite players can’t miss a class or two to see if they have a real NBA future? Hypocrisy doesn’t even cover it.

This is about college coaches — big name college coaches — who are finalizing recruiting classes and need to know if they have another hole to fill at point guard because someone is declaring for the draft. It’s not about the students. It almost never is with the NCAA. 

James Harden: “I am the best player in the league. I believe that.”

James Harden, Stephen Curry
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James Harden was the MVP last season — if you ask his fellow NBA players.

The traditional award (based on a media vote) went to Stephen Curry (in the closest vote in four years), and that was the right call (in my mind). But from the time it happened Harden did not buy it. And he still doesn’t buy it. In the least — and he’s using that as fuel for this season. That’s what he told Fran Blinebury over at

“I am the best player in the league. I believe that,” he said. “I thought I was last year, too.”

Well, it’s a more realistic claim than Paul George’s.

“But that award means most valuable to your team. We finished second in the West, which nobody thought we were going to do at the beginning of the year even when everybody was healthy. We were near the top in having the most injuries. We won our division in a division where every single team made the playoffs.

“There’s so many factors. I led the league in total points scored, minutes played. Like I said, I’m not taking anything away from Steph, but I felt I deserved the Most Valuable Player. That stays with me.”

That’s very Kobe Bryant of you to turn that into fuel. Defining the MVP Award is an annual discussion that nobody agrees on.

I could get into how Harden was the old-school, traditional stats MVP, how that ignores how Steve Kerr used Curry, and how that opened up the Warriors’ offense to championship levels. Curry put up numbers, but he was also the distraction, the bright star that Kerr used to open up looks for Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, and others. Curry’s strength was not just what he did with the ball in his hands, but his gravity to draw defenders even when he didn’t. Did the Warriors stay healthier than the Rockets? No doubt. Should Curry be penalized for that?

It’s simple for Harden — if he can put up those numbers again, if he can be the fulcrum of a top offense, he will be in the discussion for MVP again. And, if he can lead the Rockets beyond the conference finals, nobody will talk about that MVP snub anyway.