A possible hiccup in Greg Oden's recovery


Greg Oden’s rehabilitation isn’t exactly the most pressing thing on the Blazer agenda right now, but his value to the team long-term should be relatively unquestioned. He’ll likely always have the fact that he’s not Kevin Durant thrown in his face by fans ignorant to Oden’s successes, but Portland clearly values Greg not merely as an asset, but as an essential part of the team’s future.

The Greg Oden Tour wasn’t set to resume until next season anyway, but it’s still a bit worrisome to hear a report like this one from Ben Golliver of Blazers Edge:

Greg Oden’s comments during an interview on Tuesday regarding
his current status suggested that perhaps his rehab isn’t going totally
smoothly.  Oden, at home in Indiana, reported that he was mostly
staying off of his leg and icing it as much as possible when, as
recently as three weeks ago, Oden told Kerry Eggers of the Portland Tribune that he was riding bicycles and swimming in a pool.  In that same piece, Oden notes that running on an anti-gravity treadmill had caused soreness and swelling. 

“He’s doing fine. He’s doing fine,”
Nate McMillan told me after today’s practice. “The trainer is in
contact with him, making sure he’s doing what he needs to do. He’s
doing well.”  Asked directly if perhaps there had been some setback or
complication in recent weeks, McMillan shook his head no and said, “Our
trainer is up to speed with where he’s at. And he’s doing good.”

McMillan dismissed the idea, as he probably should. But should fans be worried if Oden’s rehab isn’t going as smoothly as planned?

On the one hand, it makes complete sense. Greg’s injury troubles in his young NBA career have already cost him two full seasons of action, and have rightfully put everyone on alert. He’s either injury-prone or terribly unlucky, and either way people are right to worry about Oden’s future.

Then again, this isn’t the first time that a rehab program hasn’t gone as planned and it certainly won’t be the last. What’s the use of fretting now, with half a year to go until Oden was supposed to make his grand return to the NBA? That’s more than enough time for Greg to get back on track, and to pay too much mind to his progress (or lack thereof) now seems foolish.

Still, we stay plugged into things like this because Greg Oden matters. Quite a bit, actually. Even if this supposed rehab setback is remarkably unremarkable and even though we really don’t have a firm understanding of Oden’s medical profile, we care about Greg not because he’s a convenient punchline, but because he’s still a remarkable talent capable of doing great things for the Blazer franchise.

I know that NBA teams and fans alike aren’t exactly oozing with patience, but that’s exactly what Oden needs.  

Gordon Hayward goes behind Jordan Clarkson’s back with dribble

Gordon Hayward, Nick Young
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Utah’s Gordon Hayward abused the Lakers’ Jordan Clarkson on this play.

First, Hayward reads and steals Clarkson’s poor feed into the post intended for Kobe Bryant, then going up the sideline he takes his dribble behind Clarkson’s back to keep going. It all ends in a Rudy Gobert dunk.

Three quick takeaways here:

1) Gordon Hayward is a lot better than many fans realize. He can lead this team.

2) It’s still all about the development with Clarkson, and that’s going to mean some hard lessons.

3) Hayward may have the best hair in the NBA, even if it’s going a bit Macklemore.

(Hat tip reddit)

Could Tristan Thompson’s holdout last months? Windhorst says yes.

2015 NBA Finals - Game Five

VIZZINI: “So, it is down to you. And it is down to me.”
MAN IN BLACK nods and comes nearer…
MAN IN BLACK: “Perhaps an arrangement can be reached.”
VIZZINI: “There will be no arrangement…”
MAN IN BLACK: “But if there can be no arrangement, then we are at an impasse.”

That farcical scene from The Princess Bride pretty much sums up where we are with the Tristan Thompson holdout with the Cleveland Cavaliers, minus the Iocane powder. (Although that scene was a battle of wits in the movie and this process seems to lack much wit.) The Cavaliers have put a five-year, $80 million offer on the table. Thompson wants a max deal (or at least a more than has been offered), but he also doesn’t want to play for the qualifying offer and didn’t sign it. LeBron James just wants the two sides just to get it done.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN thinks LeBron could be very disappointed.

Windhorst was on the Zach Lowe podcast at Grantland (which you should be listening to anyway) and had this to say about the Thompson holdout:

“I actually believe it will probably go months. This will go well into the regular season.”

Windhorst compared it to a similar situation back in 2007 with Anderson Varejao, which eventually only broke because the then Charlotte Bobcats signed Varejao to an offer sheet. Thompson is a restricted free agent, meaning the Cavaliers can match any offer, but only Portland and Philadelphia have the cap space right now to offer him a max contract. Neither team has shown any interest in doing so.

And so we wait. And we may be waiting a while.