The NBA's forgotten demographic

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The NBA makes all kinds of concerted efforts to account for and appeal to their target demographics. There are ticket packages designed for families with young children, dance teams that draw in the ogling masses, and sponsorships that often speak to very particular audiences. The league is even willing to fiddle with its uniforms for a few nights as a celebration of Hispanic and Spanish-speaking fans all across the globe.

There are efforts to reach out, to celebrate, to embrace, to give back, to draw in, and to flat-out earn. But there’s a startlingly large population of fans that seems to exist between the NBA’s target audiences: female fans. So much of the professional sporting experience is tailor-made for the heterosexual male, because after all, sports are manly, and sporting events are where manly men like to go.

Only the NBA audience consists of a dwindling percentage of manly men, and a growing percentage of basketball-driven women. It’s not threatening, and it’s not an invasion. Hell, it’s not even all that new. Female fans have been enjoying the NBA game for years, and the only real flaw in the NBA’s massive and comprehensive master plan to lure in and entertain their audience is that they’ve failed to cater to a good chunk of their fan base.

Sarah Tolcser framed the female fan experience — or at the very least, her female fan experience — splendidly in a guest post for Hardwood Paroxysm (which, if I may disclaim, is a site I’m a contributor for). It’s not filled with bile or rage, but a legitimate query into why no one has bothered to account for 40% of the NBA’s fans:

The NBA has been way ahead of the other major sports leagues in
pioneering some things, such as social media. It’s time they show they
can get with the program when it comes to their female fans. As a
Hornets season ticketholder, I’ve taken surveys as a member of many
different demographic classes- including ticketholder, event attender,
arena food and drink buyer, merchandise purchaser, web content
consumer, and New Orleans resident. You know what I realize they’ve
never once asked me? What more they could be doing for me as a female
fan.

And you know, NBA, I would really like to be asked that question.
Because I have some things to say that might surprise you, things like,
“The answer is not more pink jerseys.” Things like, as a member of a
growing class of unmarried women ages 25-44,”family friendly”
promotions and cute distractions on court during the game entice me no
more than they entice male fans. Things like, some of the advertising
spots from your own sponsors have sexist overtones that make me
uncomfortable. Things like, when I go to your official website and see
scantily-clad girls on the front page, I can’t help feeling that the
NBA is not meant to be “for me.”

I don’t see this evolving into a movement or a protest, but if it were to do so, there could probably be no better slogan than “The answer is not more pink jerseys.” We’re to the point where adding sequins to things really isn’t getting the job done, and all of the tiny little flashy discs in the world shouldn’t deflect our attention from the fact that a real, relevant, and influential group of NBA fans are being completely ignored.

  

Jaylen Brown’s #drivebydunkchallenge video is awesome

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I love the drive by dunk challenge (if you prefer, the #drivebydunkchallenge), it would be the best thing on NBA Twitter this summer, if it wasn’t for Kyrie Irving.

But the best one yet comes from Boston’s Jaylen Brown.

He steals the ball, and the best part is the guy who comes over like he’s going to stop Brown from throwing it down.

Nets’ Jeremy Lin: ‘We’re making the playoffs. I don’t care what anybody else says’

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The Nets went 20-62 then traded their best player (Brook Lopez) for a worse player (D'Angelo Russell). Brooklyn’s biggest free-agent signing this summer (Otto Porter) plays for the Wizards. Rondae Hollis-Jefferson and Caris LeVert are nice developmental pieces but hardly seem on the verge of breakthroughs.

Still, Nets guard Jeremy Lin expects big things next season.

He set expectations in an Instagram Live video (hat tip: AJ Neuharth-Keusch of USA Today):

We’re making the playoffs. I don’t care what anybody else says.

The Nets are on the right track given their asset constraints. Though worse than Lopez now, Russell – eight years younger and on a low-paying rookie-scale deal – is more valuable. Brooklyn made the favorable swap by absorbing Timofey Mozgov‘s awful contract, a wise use of assets considering the difficulty of attracting free agents. An aggressive offer sheet for Porter was a reasonable swing in that situation, as well.

But that’s all helpful in the long run. In the short term, the Nets are almost certainly stuck as lousy. Maybe they can sneak into the playoffs in a weak Eastern Conference, but even that is a huge longshot.

Not that Lin cares what I say.

Check out Top 10 blocks from Summer League (VIDEO)

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When you think of Summer League basketball, sharp defensive rotations is not the first thing that comes to mind. Defense, in general, tends to be an after thought.

But there were some great blocks.

Here are the top 10 blocks from the Las Vegas Summer League. Enjoy the flashes of defense from Vegas.

 

Memphis Grizzlies sign former Oregon forward Dillon Brooks

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) The Memphis Grizzlies have signed former Oregon forward Dillon Brooks, a second-round pick in last month’s NBA draft.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

Brooks was selected by the Houston Rockets with the 45th overall pick. The Grizzlies acquired him in exchange for a future second-round pick.

Brooks, 21, averaged 16.1 points, 3.2 rebounds and 2.7 assists as a junior at Oregon last season. He was named the Pac-12 player of the year and helped Oregon earn its first Final Four berth since 1939.