Who has the best mid-range game in the NBA?


Yes, the midrange game is dying. This much is known. However, there’s also a reason why the midrange game is dying. As players get more athletic and comfortable with the three-point shot, the midrange game becomes a worse and worse option. According to Hoopdata.com, shots taken from 10-23 feet are easily the least efficient shots in the league. If players are capable of getting to the rim or getting a good look from deep, there’s not a great reason to settle for a jumper that’s only worth two points. 

However, there are some guys who are still fun to watch go to work from midrange, and can definitely hurt an opposing team with a steady diet of 15-20 footers over the course of a game. Here’s my list of the best midrange shooters currently in the NBA, in no particular order:
1. Steve Nash:

One of the best pure shooters ever to play the game, even though it’s never flashy. Nash has a picture-perfect stroke with almost no moving parts, and will put it straight through the net if he’s given room to set his feet. What sets Nash apart from most great shooters is how good Nash is at setting himself up using his dribble. On the perimeter, Nash uses the screen, waits for the defender to go under, and pulls up from the open spot to knock it down. Closer to the basket, Nash has that goofy array of step-backs, runners, fadeaways, and one-footed jumpers, all of which give him a great look at the basket. The result is that Nash hits 47% of his jumpers from 16-23 feet, and a freakishly high 59% of his shots from the 10-15 foot range. 
2. Kobe Bryant

Nobody is better at getting a decent look at the basket anywhere, at any time. He can be falling into the third row, and Bryant will still manage to get his shoulders squared and his elbow tucked in perfectly. Bryant isn’t as methodical about setting up his midrange shot as some of the other guys on this list because he doesn’t need to be — he can rise up from seemingly any spot on the floor, against any coverage, and fire a shot with a good chance of going in. Defenses have to stick to him on every curl, catch, and jab-step, and sometimes that doesn’t even do much good. And of course, there’s nobody you’d rather have shooting a midrange jumper with the game on the line. Kobe makes half of his shots from 10-15 feet, and nobody in the NBA makes more shots per game from that range. 
3. Dirk Nowitzki

Dirk is perhaps best known as a 7-footer who can stroke threes, but in games he’s most comfortable using his size and shooting ability in tandem to stroke deep jumpers over opponents to small to contest them. Dirk’s got a herky-jerky set of moves and jab steps from the high post and a bit of an unorthodox stroke, but really he doesn’t need much space to fire his signature fadeaway, which he makes quite often. Dirk makes a league-leading four shots from 16-23 feet a game, and is a 47% shooter from that range.
4. Ray Allen

Best known as one of the most prolific three-point snipers in NBA history, Allen has remained productive despite shooting a career-low 35% from deep because of the improvements in his midrange game. Allen has become much better in the pull-up game, taking one or two hard dribbles on a drive and then using his gorgeous, gorgeous stroke to knock in a slightly off-balance shot. Allen makes a respectable 45% of his shots from 16-23 feet, but is shooting a Nash-like 58.3% from the 10-15 foot range, up from 47.0% last season and 31.0% the season before. One of the best pure shooters in league history just keeps learning new tricks. 
5. Derrick Rose

If Chris Paul were healthy, it would probably be his name on this list. Instead, it’s Rose, who like Paul uses his blistering speed to set himself up with room for the pull-up jumper. Rose makes nearly half of his jumpers from the 10-15 foot range, where defenders have to back up more than they’d like to because of Rose’s ability to take it to the rack. Rose also makes 3 shots from the 16-23 foot range per game, but that’s a product of Rose taking a whole lot of them; only Nowitzki takes more shots from that range. 
Well, that’s my list. Apologies to Carmelo Anthony, Luol Deng, and Rip Hamilton, who are talented scorers and clearly comfortable shooting from mid-range, but don’t make those shots at a particularly high percentage. Kevin Durant came within an inch of the list, but his 36% shooting from 16-23 feet kept him off. He’s a beast from 10-15 feet, though. Well, let me know what you think. 

Report: Matt Barnes attacked Derek Fisher, who’s dating Barnes’ estranged wife

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook

Matt Barnes is an instigator. He has been arrested for domestic violence. He also had a weird thing where he implied he was dating Rihanna only for her to claim they’d never never met.

Which is to say this is believable – that the Grizzlies forward attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources said Fisher was at the LA home of Gloria Govan — Barnes’ estranged wife​,​ who stars on “Basketball Wives LA” — on Saturday. Fisher and Govan have been dating for “a few months,” a source said, after Fisher filed to divorce his wife of 10 years, Candace, in March.

But when Barnes learned that Fisher was at his former home with Gloria, he drove 95 miles to LA to “beat the s–t” out of Fisher, sources said.

“Derek was in Gloria’s back yard with about 10 people having a bonfire on ​​Saturday,” said a source. “Derek’s separated from his wife and there’s a relationship with [Gloria].”

The source added, “Barnes was in Santa Barbara [at Memphis Grizzlies training camp] and heard that Fisher was in his house. He went crazy. He got in his car and went to the house and went after Fisher.”

​A source close to Fisher ​confirmed the fight but said, “Matt came after Derek but he only had a few scratches … Derek’s not going to press charges, he’s going to let it go.”

Even if Fisher – who missed practice Monday for what the Knicks called “personal reasons” – isn’t pressing charges, the NBA is investigating.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports:

This is a weird jurisdictional issue, especially if no criminal charges are filed. But I wouldn’t be surprised if the league punishes Barnes – a former Lakers teammate of Fisher – if it finds evidence to support the Post’s description of events.

Caron Butler details Gilbert Arenas-Javaris Crittenton gun incident

Caron Butler

Caron Butler wrote an autobiography, a recently published excerpt details his accounting of the Gilbert Arenas-Javaris Crittenton gun incident when they were with the Wizards.

An excerpt of the excerpt in The Washington Post:

When I entered the locker room, I thought I had somehow been transported back to my days on the streets of Racine. Gilbert was standing in front of his two locker stalls, the ones previously used by Michael Jordan, with four guns on display. Javaris was standing in front of his own stall, his back to Gilbert.

“Hey, MF, come pick one,” Gilbert told Javaris while pointing to the weapons. “I’m going to shoot your [expletive] with one of these.”

“Oh no, you don’t need to shoot me with one of those,” said Javaris, turning around slowly like a gunslinger in the Old West. “I’ve got one right here.”

He pulled out his own gun, already loaded, cocked it, and pointed it at Gilbert.

Other players who had been casually arriving, laughing and joking with each other, came to a sudden halt, their eyes bugging out. It took them only a few seconds to realize this was for real, a shootaround of a whole different nature. They all looked at each other and then they ran, the last man out locking the door behind him.

Somebody outside the locker room called 911. Flip Saunders was the coach back then, but he was too scared to even come into the locker room.

Click through to read the entire excerpt. It’s captivating.

Arenas is essentially retired and still spouting off silly takes.

Crittenton is currently serving a 23-year sentence for voluntary manslaughter.

Butler plays for the Kings.