Jordan actually present this time around, and it's not a good thing

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Michael Jordan’s majority ownership of the Charlotte Bobcats was announced just over a week ago, but his approach is already drastically different. Namely, it seems like he actually cares. I’m not necessarily sold that he does, but for once, post-retirement Jordan is trying to sell us on himself the way he’s always tried to sell us on his shoes, on Hanes, and on Gatorade.

Head of basketball operations Jordan didn’t even bother to be in the city for home games, much less care what anyone had to say. Part-owner Jordan didn’t often go to watch his team in person, much less care what anyone had to say. And now, after the announcement that Jordan will be the official owner of the Charlotte Bobcats, he’s suddenly sitting right there at the end of the bench, posturing like all hell for the cameras, and still doesn’t much care what anyone has to say.

He still wants to be visible because he’s still Michael Jordan. And though he’s enjoyed his stint away from the constant bright lights, let’s not for a minute pretend that he doesn’t like the attention. Jordan’s afforded the opportunity to be callous because he knows that no matter what he does, the lights will find him. The cameras will find him. And before it may have taken a glance around the luxury boxes to see him glad-handing a potential sponsor, but now with his name in the headlines once again, Jordan is making himself completely visible yet again.

Take this quick hit from Ira Winderman in his recap of last night’s Heat-Bobcats game:

Michael Jordan, Charlotte’s impending majority owner, not only is
becoming more of a fixture at Bobcats games, but now sits at the end of
the team’s bench. Somehow, we couldn’t envision Pat Riley sharing fist
pumps with Yakhouba Diawara.

I know that’s Mark Cuban’s shtick, but here’s the difference: in all of Cuban’s years as Owner of the Dallas Mavericks, I’ve never once questioned his commitment or sincerity. He lives and dies with that team. It’s why he’s outspoken, it’s why he sends in tapes that showcase bad refereeing, it’s why David Stern takes a long sigh before answering a phone with Mark on the other end. The Mavs were his team long before they were his team, and for an owner of that mentality, sitting on the bench and being more involved makes sense.

But for Jordan? Grow up, man. We’ve seen you try to run the show before, and I don’t expect to see you jumping up and down after a Raymond Felton three-pointer. Hell, I didn’t even really expect for you to show up for the games at all. But here you are, gracing the Bobcats’ bench with your presence, and making everything considerably more difficult and awkward in the process.

As Kelly Dwyer notes in the link above, it doesn’t have to be this way. Michael doesn’t have to be part of the reason why Larry Brown will leave the Bobcats this summer, and he doesn’t have to be the reason why the players in Charlotte grow increasingly agitated with the act. It could all end here and MJ could do a fine job of not only running the team, but conducting himself in an appropriate manner that isn’t a complete betrayal of everything we’ve known about Jordan since his playings days came to a close.

If he wasn’t already a parody of himself before, Jordan certainly is now. I just wish he wouldn’t do it at the expense of a franchise that’s always been dangerously close to ruin, but has seen their first flash of hope in the team’s young history. 

Report: Dallas picks up option on Yogi Ferrell for next season. As expected.

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When teams sign a guy out of the D-League, or late second-round picks/undrafted guys as you see this summer, they are often announced as “a three-year deal.” The reality, this is a non-guaranteed contract (or at most a guaranteed contract for a short period of time) with team options for future years.

Why teams do that is guys like Yogi Ferrell.

Dallas snapped him up out of the D-League last season when they needed a point guard, and Ferrell proved to be a solid rotation-level player to bring off the bench. With that Dallas now has the option to bring him back at a good price next season, and they will do just that, reports Tim MacMahon of ESPN.

Sources say the Mavs have informed PG Yogi Ferrell that they are picking up his team option for next season, an easy decision after he proved himself capable of being a rotation player after his promotion from the D-League.

Ferrell will make $1.3 million next season, a steal for a rotation player. Dallas needs that, because the cost of keeping Nerlens Noel could push the Mavericks close to the luxury tax.

If Ferrell keeps playing like he did last season, and his big payday is coming in a couple of years.

What exactly was on the table for Bulls in Jimmy Butler trade?

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It’s been the cry since the Bulls’ front office traded Jimmy Butler for Zach LaVine (coming off an ACL surgery), Kris Dunn, and the No. 7 pick (Lauri Markkanen):

Why didn’t the Bulls get more?

I’m in the camp they didn’t get enough, starting with the question why did they give Minnesota the No. 16 pick in the deal? Even if the Bulls keep that pick, it doesn’t feel like they got enough for an All-NBA player, a top-flight wing defender who can also get buckets with the ball in his hands. The Bulls could have been patient and waited out a better offer, one of this quality would always have been on the table.

However, the deals for Butler may not have been as rich as fans assume. Here is part of what ESPN’s Zach Lowe wrote breaking down the trade.

It’s not as if Chicago didn’t canvas the league, either. The Bulls talked to Phoenix about a package centered around Eric Bledsoe and the No. 4 pick, but nothing came close, according to league sources. (Those talks may have been linked at one point to Cleveland’s pursuit of Butler, which apparently fizzled Thursday as Dan Gilbert, the Cavs’ owner, tried to hire a new president of basketball operations on the freaking day of the draft.)

They poked around with Denver, but the Nuggets drew a line at Jamal Murray, sources say. Those teams had to weigh the possibility of Butler bolting in 2019, which cooled the market a bit, sources say.

Boston has danced around Butler for almost a year now, and would not include the No. 3 pick in any package for him as the draft approached, sources say. Other reports suggest they refused to offer next year’s Nets pick, or the Lakers-Kings pick they snagged from Philly in the Markelle Fultz deal.

Boston’s Danny Ainge wanted a deal, a bit of a discount, and the Bulls were not going to give it. Those pick requests are reasonable for a Top 15 player, but Ainge knows he can be patient and the Celtics will still win more than 50 games next season and be a contender in a couple of years. Ainge knows he has a real shot at Gordon Hayward as a free agent this summer. He knows it’s not Butler or bust, so he didn’t go all in. He can afford to be patient right now, but eventually he will have to make a move.

The lack of a better market for Butler speaks to a couple of things. Phoenix, Denver, and other teams are correct to worry about overpaying for a player that could leave in a couple of years. Maybe they can win him over with their culture, maybe a team like Denver becomes very dangerous with Butler in the mix with Nikola Jokic, but is that enough. This is also where the looming shadow of Golden State, the Mount Everest looming over all things in the West, comes into play — how much do teams want to pay to try to contend right now?

Still, the Bulls could have done better. At least know a direction is set, the Bulls are rebuilding. Can Gar/Pax pull that off is another question entirely.

Klay Thompson goes up for 360 dunk in exhibition… and he’s not a dunker (VIDEO)

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Klay Thompson has an amazing skill set — one of the best pure shooters in the league, he can put the ball on the floor and create, and he’s a very good perimeter defender.

He’s not a dunker. Oh, he can dunk, but he’s not the guy you’re inviting to the Dunk Contest.

Case in point, this video out of China where Thompson was part of an exhibition and tried to show off his dunking skills.

Thompson’s shoe sponsor is China-based Anta, which explains why he’s there playing some exhibition ball. In case you missed it, Thompson had a Finals shoe released.

Those are about as good as the 360 dunk.

Sixers will talk contract extension for Joel Embiid this summer, want to lock him up

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Could Joel Embiid be Philadelphia’s Stephen Curry?

No, I don’t mean taking 30-foot bombs that demoralize opponents (although, no doubt Embiid is game for trying it). I mean in having a contract extension off his rookie deal for less than the max, a value contract that allows the Sixers the cap room to secure a title contender around him.

After three seasons in the NBA, Joel Embiid is eligible for a contract extension this summer (one that would be negotiated now but not kick in until the 2018-19 season). Teams lock up their stars at this point, and Embiid is that — he was dominant in the 31 games he played. But it’s 31 games in three seasons, how much do the Sixers want to pay here?

Sixers owner Joshua Harris said extending Embiid is a priority for the team this summer, speaking at a press conference, via the Courier Times.

“Look, I’d just say we want Joel to be on the team for a long time,” Harris said. “We want us all to grow old together. That’s the way I would put it.”

A max contract for Embiid would be five years at about $130 million, an average annual salary of $26 million. Because of his injury history, would he be willing to sign five years at $100 million, maybe with an opt-out after four? That extra cap space may not sound like a lot, it’s not a Curry-level savings, but it would help the Sixers’ team building.

If the two sides can’t reach a deal by Oct. 31 (the deadline), Embiid will play out this season then be a restricted free agent next season. If he stays healthy, he will get a max deal from another team that the Sixers would just match (the Sixers and Embiid could also reach a deal).

The Sixers are not about to let Embiid go, they have their young core they believe they can contend with in a few years. Plus he is a fan favorite. The only question left is cost.