Who should the Grizzlies have drafted?

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Behind every disastrous NBA draft selection there’s usually some solid logic at work. Detroit already had Tayshaun Prince at small forward, and were such a good team that a long-term prospect made more sense than a guy who would provide an immediate impact. When Atlanta drafted Marvin Williams over Chris Paul, plenty of reputable experts thought that Marvin had more potential than CP3. Portland had Clyde Drexler at shooting guard when they passed on Michael Jordan. 

The Grizzlies’ recent demotion of #2 overall pick Hasheem Thabeet to the D-League has led many to declare the pick a bust already. I think it’s a little too early to completely give up on Thabeet’s career, because he does have some serious size and athletic ability. However, with how ineffective Thabeet has been and how good some of his fellow rookies have been, now might be a good time to examine what some of Memphis’ other options may have been. 
James Harden:

This is a pick Memphis was almost certainly not going to make. Harden is a very talented young player. He’s been great off the bench for the upstart Thunder, and will only get better as he improves his ability to finish at the rim. However, two of Grizzlies’ best young players are O.J. Mayo and Rudy Gay. Mayo is a shooting guard and Gay is a small forward, which are Harden’s two natural positions. He’s perfect providing a rest for Kevin Durant and a change of pace from the offensively limited Thabo Sefolosha in Oklahoma City, but Memphis may have had trouble finding minutes for him.
Tyreke Evans: 

In my opinion, this pick would have been a home run for the Grizzlies. They may have been concerned about Evans’ ability to be a true point guard and play next to O.J. Mayo. Evans’ passing skills have been better than advertised in the NBA, and I’m a big fan of putting two combo guards next to each other. Mayo’s assist ratio isn’t great, but he has the ability to make plays from the shooting guard spot and could’ve complimented Evans’ scoring ability nicely. Also, Evans going into the paint and setting Mayo up with open looks could’ve made for an absolutely punishing backcourt tandem. 
Ricky Rubio:

Rubio is a pure point guard, a good defender, and would’ve had a Spanish teammate in Marc Gasol. However, there were some reports that Rubio would not have come to Memphis if the Grizzlies drafted him. Since he made good on his threats to the Timberwolves, it might be best to give the Grizzlies the benefit of the doubt for not drafting Rubio. Rubio could’ve been a good fit, but it may be a moot point. 
Jonny Flynn:

Flynn has been solid for the Timberwolves, but the Syracuse product has yet to blow the doors off the NBA. Mike Conley Jr. hasn’t been great so far in his NBA career. However, Greg Oden’s former running mate is still only 22 years old, and isn’t that far removed from being a #4 overall pick himself. The Grizzlies may have been hesitant to give up on Conley for anyone they weren’t in love with, especially after they traded Kyle Lowry at last year’s trade deadline. 
Stephen Curry:

Curry has show excellent playmaking and scoring skills in Golden State, and has been one of the few bright spots in Golden State’s miserable season. He has one of the NBA’s purest strokes, and shows an understanding of the game well beyond his years in the league. The Timberwolves may have been wary of pairing him with O.J. Mayo, another scoring guard who likes the ball in his hands. They apparently aren’t the only team with misgivings about pairing Mayo and Curry, as the Warriors apparently denied a trade that would have given them both O.J. Mayo and Thabeet for Monta Ellis. I’m not sure why teams think Curry couldn’t work next to Mayo (on a team, not a sandwich); if Curry can thrive next to the black hole that is Monta Ellis, he can play with anybody. 
High draft picks have been known to surprise fans after slow starts to their NBA career. But with how well some of the rookie guards have been playing, Memphis has to be seriously questioning whether going big was the right move on draft night. 

It’s a trend: Russell Westbrook posts video of him singing two more breakup songs

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 21:  Russell Westbrook #0 of the Oklahoma City Thunder and Kevin Durant #35 discuss play during the first half against the Los Angeles ClipperLos Angeles Kingsat Staples Center on December 21, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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At this point, there is zero chance Russell Westbrook‘s posts are a coincidence.

First. he posted a video of himself singing along to Lil Uzi Vert’s “Now I Do What I Want.”

Then came the shoe ad that was another little jab at now Warriors Kevin Durant.

Now comes Westbrook’s return to karaoke posts, this time singing Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Getting Back Together” and Katy Perry’s “Wide Awake.”

Apparently, Westbrook and Durant are having one rough teenage breakup.

Fun throwback video: Paul George vicious dunk on LeBron’s Heat

Indiana Pacers' Paul George goes up for a dunk during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets, Friday, Dec. 18, 2015, in Indianapolis. Indiana won 104-97. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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One of the great stories of last season was the return of Paul George to All-Star level form (then to watch him be crucial to the USA winning gold this summer).

It was a great story because vintage Paul George was so great. Watch this throwback video of him blowing by LeBron James and dunking over Chris Andersen from a few years back — this is vicious.

@ygtrece to the rack in the #NBAPlayoffs! #NBAvault

A video posted by NBA History (@nbahistory) on

By the way, if you’re not following NBA history on Twitter and Instagram, you’re doing it wrong.

Chris Bosh on if he’s working out: “Yes, I’m hooping. I’m a hooper.”

CHARLOTTE, NC - APRIL 25:  Chris Bosh #1 of the Miami Heat watches on from the bench against the Charlotte Hornets during game four of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals of the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Time Warner Cable Arena on April 25, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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Chris Bosh wants to play basketball this season. Of that, there is no doubt.

The question is will the Heat let him after he missed the end of the last two seasons due to potentially life-threatening blood clots? If so, will he have minutes or travel restrictions?

Bosh is working out to get ready for the season — he posted a video of it Monday on Snapchat, showing off his handles, and put it this way: Ues, he’s hooping.

The Heat and Bosh need to come to common ground on this before training camp opens. Bosh is on blood thinners for his condition, the team and he need to decide if he can come off them on game days or if there is another protocol that works for everyone.

The Heat would be a vastly better team with Bosh on the court this season, but that didn’t motivate them to bring him back during the playoffs last season (even though he wanted to). Whatever happens, Bosh wants to play.

Former Nuggets coach Bernie Bickerstaff talks when Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf sat for Anthem

15 Mar 1996: Point guard Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf of the Denver Nuggets stands in prayer during the singing of the National Anthem before the Nuggets game against the Chicago Bulls at the United Center in Chicago, Illinois. Abdul-Rauf came to an agreement with
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Twenty years before Colin Kaepernick made his stand by sitting for the national anthem during preseason games — something he has every right to do: if we are going to force compliance in our rituals of allegiance how are we different as a nation than the countries we rail against for forced indoctrination? — the NBA had Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf.

For those that don’t remember, Abdul-Rauf was a good NBA guard and a member of a Denver Nuggets in the mid-1990s. He had converted to being a Muslim during his playing career. As his faith and beliefs grew, he came to view the flag as a symbol of oppression. In the middle of the 1995-96 season, he told the NBA he would no longer stand for the anthem. Everything was kept quiet for a while, but when the PR storm hit it led to a few strange days — the league suspended him at one point — before was a compromise where he would stand for the anthem but pray into his hands during it.

Bernie Bickerstaff was the coach of the Nuggets at the time and went on SiriusXM NBA Radio Monday to talk about those days. His first reaction was that of virtually every coach who has heard or talked about Kaepernick.

“Distractions,” Bickerstaff said. “It caused a lot of distractions, and you know at that point the number of media members was not quite as resounding as it is today. But still, it was a distraction.”

Bickerstaff said he was blindsided byAbdul-Rauf’s decision, and he said they scrambled to deal with the fallout. He said he and the brain trust of the team eventually had a meeting with the guard and told him if he wanted to be on the team he had to stand for the anthem.

“We had him come in, to sit down and have a conversation, and the conversation was about, the one thing that we have in this life is freedom of choice, and with that choice comes consequences. And my conversation with him was simply that one of the guys I probably admired most at that time was Muhammad Ali, because not only did he make a decision not to step forward but it was the part of it, the things that he gave up, and our message basically to (Abdul-Rauf) was ‘Hey, that’s the guy I admire. If you really feel that way then you go home, and you give us a call and let us know you’re willing to walk away from that contract, and then I can really, really, respect that…

“When he got home, we got a call and he said ‘I think I want to be on the trip.’ And that’s our understanding, if you’re on the trip, then you’re standing.”

The NBA came in with a more fair compromise.

If this were to happen again with the NBA, it would be interesting to see how Adam Silver would handle this compared to the heavy-handed David Stern.