Is Daequan Cook the worst All-Star Saturday participant ever?


Due to an interesting wrinkle in how NBA All-Star Saturday works, Daequan Cook was invited to All-Star weekend to defend his title as the champion of the three-point shootout. This means that  Cook gets to participate in All-Star weekend despite the fact he has had very little success at playing basketball this season. In 31 games for the Miami Heat this season, Cook is averaging 4.4 points and 0.8 assists per game while shooting an abysmal 28.8% from the field and 30% from beyond the arc. If Daequan Cook isn’t the worst player ever to ever participate in an All-Star Saturday event, he’s certainly close. 

Cook’s selection prompted me to think about other All-Star Saturday participants who weren’t very good players from recent years. Most of them were having more success than Cook when they participated, but All-Star Saturday has certainly seen its share of interesting characters in recent years. Here are a few that spring to mind for me:
Gerald Green, 2007 Dunk Contest Champion and 2008 Dunk Contest Participant

Green gave the dunk contest some of the best performances it has ever seen, throwing down massive windmills, smooth between-the-legs dunks, one of the few dunks ever done in socks, and the unforgettable “Birthday Cake” dunk, which also introduced Green and Rashard McCants as two players who absolutely should’ve had their own reality show. 
Blessed with otherworldly athleticism and a sweet three-point stroke, Green had all the talent required to be a superstar in the NBA, but he never came anywhere close to putting it together. He had no idea what to do if the ball wasn’t in his hands, and was a stunningly inept defender and passer. During his final NBA stint in Dallas, Green somehow managed to record only 15 assists in 38 games, which goes beyond selfishness and into performance art. 
Damon Jones, 2007 Three-Point Shootout Participant

Jones got into the contest by openly begging for an invite; the self-declared “Best Shooter in The Universe,” Jones’ main NBA goals were to win a three-point shootout and be part of a three-man booth while playing in a game. Jones was a valuable contributor to the Miami Heat once upon a time, but during his stint with the Cavs he was known for literally doing nothing but shoot catch-and-shoot threes. Although Jones was supposedly a point guard, he had a hard time just bringing the ball up the floor, and his defense was nonexistent. His shooting was never good enough to make up for his deficiencies as an overall player, but his All-Star invite is a testament to how anything is possible if you’re shameless enough. 
Desmond Mason, 2001 Dunk Contest Champion and 2002 Dunk Contest Participant

To be fair to Mason, he was a productive enough player when he was actually participating in the dunk contest. Since that time, however, Mason has become the poster child for what happens to one-dimensional athletes when they age without evolving their game. He’s been one of the worst rotation players in basketball for the last few years; last season, he somehow managed to record a PER of just over seven, which is less than half the league average of 15. 
Antoine Walker, 2003 Three-Point Shootout Participant

Again, out of fairness to Walker, he was a very good player when he was invited to the shootout. This choice stands out because it rewarded Walker’s penchant for three-point shooting, even though he was perhaps the most egregious chucker from beyond the arc in the history of the NBA. The year Walker was invited to the contest, he only shot 32.3% from beyond the arc, but was firing seven and a half threes a game. Antoine got a three-point contest invite when what he needed was a three-point intervention, and that’s why he makes the list. 

Report: Matt Barnes texted friend that he beat up Derek Fisher, spat in wife’s face

Derek Fisher, Matt Barnes, Russell Westbrook
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Grizzlies forward Matt Barnes reportedly attacked Knicks coach Derek Fisher for dating his estranged wife, Gloria Govan.

New details are emerging, and they cast Barnes in an even worse light.

Ian Mohr of the New York Post:

Sources told The Post that Barnes became incensed when his 6-year-old twin sons, Carter and Isaiah, called to tell him that Fisher was at the house.

Following the dust-up, Barnes, 35, texted a pal that he had not only assaulted Fisher, 41, but also took revenge on Govan, one source said.

“I kicked his ass from the back yard to the front room, and spit in her face,” the text read, according to the source.

If this becomes a criminal case, Barnes’ text could incriminate him.

In the court of public opinion, the presence of Barnes’ children and his spitting in his wife’s face make this even more disturbing.

Unfortunately, not everyone views it that way. Too many are laughing off the incident.

Albert Burneko of Deadspin had the best take I’ve seen on this situation:

When an accused domestic abuser shows up uninvited at a family party to—as a source put it to the New York Post—“beat the shit” out of someone for the offense of dating his ex, that is not a wacky character up to zany shenanigans. It is not reality TV melodrama or a cartoon or celebrities being silly. It is the behavior of a dangerous misogynist lunatic. It is an act of violent aggression. It is a man forcefully asserting personal property rights over a woman’s home, body, and life. It differs from what Ray Rice did in that elevator by degree, not by kind, and not by all that much.

I suggest reading it in full.